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I know my room is acoustically horrible... It has eccoes and open odd shaped walls and solid odd shaped walls and everything in between but I want to figure out where the problems lie so I can maybe get an external EQ (specifically for my subwoofers and fronts if that is possible) so That I can run Audessey then SPL and EQ the results till they are flat.


PLEASE UNDERSTAND - this is 100% new to me.


1. What do I need to start? Do you use a computer program with a microphone attached?


2. Do external EQ's for speakers exist? How do you wire them? Are they just put in between the receiver and the speaker/sunwoofer?


3. Once results are generated do you just reduce or increase the nobs depending on the results at various frequencies?


4. Where can I get this type of stuff for a reasonable price?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by goonstopher /forum/post/15439961


I know my room is acoustically horrible... It has eccoes and open odd shaped walls and solid odd shaped walls and everything in between but I want to figure out where the problems lie so I can maybe get an external EQ (specifically for my subwoofers and fronts if that is possible) so That I can run Audessey then SPL and EQ the results till they are flat.

The may be a good thing. Odd shaped and non-parallel surfaces break up standing waves



It would help us to let us know what you have in your system so far


I'm just going to answer what I know best and let the pros handle the rest...


Quote:
2. Do external EQ's for speakers exist? How do you wire them? Are they just put in between the receiver and the speaker/sunwoofer?

An external EQ (not one built into the receiver or pre-pro) will go between the receiver and the amplifier. To do this, your receiver must have pre-outs so you can externally amplify your speakers. Equalizers must work at the signal level, before amplification.

Quote:
3. Once results are generated do you just reduce or increase the nobs depending on the results at various frequencies?

...pretty much. If it is a graphic EQ then there will be sliders to set frequencies. Not the most effective. A parametric EQ will be better. This will allow you to set the gain, width (Q), and frequency for each channel of EQ.
 

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Quote:
The may be a good thing. Odd shaped and non-parallel surfaces break up standing waves

Not really. non-parallel walls will tend to create modal frequencies based upon the average distance between the two surfaces. Modal response in "odd" shaped rooms will create different responses based upon the distance between the surfaces at the point of measurement. You don't get rid of modal response, simply the modal frequencies will be different in different seating areas making the whole process of calibration a bigger challenge.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by goonstopher /forum/post/15439961


I know my room is acoustically horrible... It has eccoes and open odd shaped walls and solid odd shaped walls and everything in between but I want to figure out where the problems lie so I can maybe get an external EQ (specifically for my subwoofers and fronts if that is possible) so That I can run Audessey then SPL and EQ the results till they are flat.


PLEASE UNDERSTAND - this is 100% new to me.


1. What do I need to start? Do you use a computer program with a microphone attached?


2. Do external EQ's for speakers exist? How do you wire them? Are they just put in between the receiver and the speaker/sunwoofer?


3. Once results are generated do you just reduce or increase the nobs depending on the results at various frequencies?


4. Where can I get this type of stuff for a reasonable price?

a relatively simple approach could be to get an spl meter, which you can get at radio shack for about $50 or so.


then find a source for test tones. some cd's have test tones. some free programs can generate them. they can also be downloaded from various websites.


play the test tones and measure the reading on the meter. do this in the range with which you are concerned, perhaps 20hz-125hz. take a reading every 5hz.


then, you will use equalization to beat down the peaks. filling in the nulls is not recommended because nulls are acoustical black holes. you can pour a ton of amplification into trying to raise them.


you will want to use "parametric eq". you can look that up.


there are typically just a couple very bad offenders, so just a couple of eq's should improve the sound dramatically.


good luck.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by goonstopher /forum/post/15439961


I know my room is acoustically horrible... It has eccoes and open odd shaped walls and solid odd shaped walls and everything in between but I want to figure out where the problems lie so I can maybe get an external EQ (specifically for my subwoofers and fronts if that is possible) so That I can run Audessey then SPL and EQ the results till they are flat.


PLEASE UNDERSTAND - this is 100% new to me.


1. What do I need to start? Do you use a computer program with a microphone attached?


2. Do external EQ's for speakers exist? How do you wire them? Are they just put in between the receiver and the speaker/sunwoofer?


3. Once results are generated do you just reduce or increase the nobs depending on the results at various frequencies?


4. Where can I get this type of stuff for a reasonable price?

Just run Audyssey and, if you possibly can, install some good acoustical treatment to the room. There are threads about both.
 
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