AVS Forum banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just like the topic states. Im drawing a blank as to how to finish this wall off. The problem is that the stairs go right up to the foundation wall. On the other side is Pine T&G boards. In not to crazy about the pine, but the other problem is that that wall is a load bearing, and the stairs go right to that also.


Putting up drywall would be ideal, but there is no screwing surface. Not only that the drywall would have to be notched for each stair. The stringers for the stairs are glued right up the the foundation. Im thinking the pine is about my only option, but this too would require notching each piece.


Any Ideas?







 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts
Just get a thirty dollar powder nailer from HD - nail up some strapping, put some rigid insulation in the cavities and drywall away. Easy as pie.


As far as notching for the stairs...you're going to have to do it either way, unless you want to make a side stringer out of wood. I've seen people do it with a solid piece with all the notches measured and cut, but I've also seen people who had cut individual triangles.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
What I have done in these situations is drylock the wall if needed, then run a 1x3 or bigger down the wall so it lays on top of the tread running down and attach it to the concrete. Liquid nail the drywall right to the concrete-butting it up to the drywall at the top of the stairs and then down to the 1x3. You can fill in the area between the tread and 1x3 or prime and paint everything to match. Hope that helps.


You could repeat this on the pine side to match things up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
471 Posts
I was planning on posting this exact same questions. I have the same problem on my stairs. I'm curious what others did.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
that's definitely not a load bearing wall by the way... if it was load bearing it would be much more substantial than single 2x4's, and would probably need a footing under it. Also you can see that the floor joists are doubled up at the bottom of the staircase to tie into this section...


For the staircase, I would rebuild it and start by adding a stringer spaced out to accept drywall and framing on the sides.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
4,606 Posts
In my old build, in MA, they treated the concrete wall with some chemical then they attached plaster direct to the wall. Up in MA everything is done in a veneer plaster with blueboard (as opposed to drywall), so attaching the plaster direct to the wall made it match the rest of the house. The wall was slightly cooler to the touch.
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,173 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by 06bluez /forum/post/17032021


that's definitely not a load bearing wall by the way...

Excuse me, what is holding up the ends of the floor joists? It looks like it IS a load bearing wall. Unless there is a beam above the wall top plate that is held up by something out of the view of the pictures. Behind the photographer in this case.


 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
I think we need more pics of that pine wall. Zoom out so we can see what you have. From what I can see it looks like a load bearing wall though I agree it's not supported like you would normally see. Maybe it was modified at some point in the past?
 

·
RETIRED theater builder
Joined
·
36,173 Posts
The cross bracing is a clue. Also studying the pics some more I don't see an emergency egress window or a single piece of insulation on the concrete above the frost line. That lack of insulation in Wisconsin is surprising unless the pics are post demo and it has been stripped bare.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
Another option would be to just (carefully) pull up the treads and risers, store them off to the side, cover the foundation with drywall (I'd probably powdergun furring strips then screw drywall myself) lastly, cut the treads and risers down to fit and reinstall.


It might be a little more difficult to get them off without damage if they installed with twist or ringshank nails though. Might have to just pull them and replace them with new if you can't get them up without damaging them.


Lastly, you should take a quick check to see what your final tread width will be and see what your local code says you need as a minimum width for stairs. This may necessitate one method over another (IE. If you're currently at 37 wide and your local code requires minimum 36 width treads, you won't have space to put a 1 furring strip and drywall and keep it to code.)


-Suntan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,572 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGmouthinDC /forum/post/17032392


That lack of insulation in Wisconsion is surprising unless the pics are post demo and it has been stripped bare.

They could have had insulation blown and sealed to the outside of the foundation before backfilling. My (Minnesota) home has the foundation insulated on the outside like this.


-Suntan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
280 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Suntan /forum/post/17032462


They could have had insulation blown and sealed to the outside of the foundation before backfilling. My (Minnesota) home has the foundation insulated on the outside like this.


-Suntan

They've started doing that in my area as well. It doesn't take away the need for insulation on the interior, though. Of course I'm in Canada - could be different for you folks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Johnsteph10 /forum/post/17031928


Agreed with above.


Seal the concrete with DryLok.


Directly attach moisture-resistant drywall (green board! very important) to the concrete using adhesive (liquid nails, PL, etc.).

I didn't think you could use green board anymore? I thought it had to be the water proof cement board stuff?


I could be wrong but I thought someone had told me that greenboard isn't code anymore...or maybe it was just for the bathroom behind the shower wall that we were discussing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
216 Posts
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Hey everyone, thanks for the replies.


The wall is infact a load bearing wall. The wall along the stairs supports the one end of the floor joists that being supported by the I-beam on the other end of the floor joists.. if that makes sense.


My first thought was to use a jamb saw to cut the treads and risers along the foundation wall to create small gap for drywall to fit in, but how to secure the drywall to concrete? Adhesive and tapcon screws came to mind, but thats kind of ghetto. Then theres the problem of the stair stringer being mounted directly to the foundation wall. If I use the jam saw, I have the potential of only having 1" of tread on the stringer as opposed to the whole 1.5"... possible safety issue.


So far the idea about the 1x3 on top of the steps running at an angle is sounding like the best, but then I have the problem of filling in.


One idea that I had was to grind the high spots down on the foundation and just fill in with joint compound. Although the mess would be huge, it could be contained. Every time Ive spilled joint compund on the floor its been a PITA to get off. It seems like this would work, but my OCD with things being symetrical would take over from there on the pine side.


So if it were a perfect world, I think rebuilding the stairs would be key. I would like to carpet the stairs anyway, so even if the treads and risers got damaged, I wouldn't have to replace them with finished ones like the ones that are on there now.


As for the insulation, it is infact on the outside. Although this does nothing for keeping the basement warm, it is there. Insulation on the inside is up to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,572 Posts
If your going to carpet the stairs anyway, I'd pull them up, put drywall up on the foundation, either with furring strips or directly to the concrete. Then chop the treads to size (or slightly shorter, leaving 1/4" or less between the drywall and tread (the carpet will cover this.)


As for catching the stringer with the treads, you can always cut 2x4s a little shorter than the tread and screw them into the side of the stringer, then screw the treads into the 2x4s.


-Suntan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
893 Posts
Check my thread, I had the same scenario... I sealed the concrete, I then had treated plywood ripped to strips, used a hammer drill and screwed the strips to the concrete, put insulation foam in, caulked it all up, then applied drywall.


It looks totally seamless after the drywall was completed. If I look really hard, I can barely tell on 1 corner because the concrete was not straight and it produced a 1/8" difference between the existing and new 1/2" drywall.


I took a ton of pics and gave a pictoral play by play if you are interested.


I planned ahead and mounted a board where the handrail will go, so I do not take a chance of the handrail pulling through the drywall if I tried to mount it over drywall/foam board. (You can see it in the pics)


Also, if you go my route, buy a small box of 1" drywall screws. In my scenario, the existing drywall stuck out 1" past the concrete, this meant 1.25" screws would do me no good. If yours is a bigger gap, you can go with thicker drywall or strips to compensate for the gap. Try and get the 2 surfaces within 1/8" and your mud guy can float it to look seamless.
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top