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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am considering purchasing an upconverting dvd recorder from either samsung or possibly sony. My question is, being that these are single disc recorders, how would i go about burning a copy of a dvd I already own for my own personal back-up copy? Is there any way to sync a second dvd player with the recorder to accomplish this? I have an old (no idea how old) hitachi progressive scan player. It does have component outputs, not sure about component inputs however. Is there any way to accomplish this using these two players? If not, what would be the best technology to purchase to accomplish this?
 

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All you have to do is feed the "OUTPUTS" of ANY BRAND OF DVD PLAYER to the "INPUTS" of the DVD Recorder & this can be done using ANY BRAND OF DVD RECORDER because they ALL have some type of Inputs on them.


If your thinking of copying "Store Bought" DVDs that contain the Macrovision Copyguard System then you will need to also purchase a "Video Filter" to get rid of the Copyguard.


Do a search here for "Video Filters" or "Sima" a brand of Video Filter & you should get a bunch of info on the filters.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joe_M /forum/post/0


Use a PC.

A little more detail. If your computer has a DVD burner, find and install DVDecrypter, DVDShrink, or DVD Fab Decrypter. Any will make bit-for-bit copies and remove copy protection. This is legal if you are making one copy for your personal collection of movies that you bought legally. (This is my understanding - the laws may have changed).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart /forum/post/0


Not in the United States or any other country with DMCA-like laws.


Defeating encryption to copy such material was made illegal by the DMCA despite the Fair Use Act. Just FYI.

I agree with this. Defeating copy protection in the USA has been deemed a violation. By this I mean using computer programs that circumvent this protection.


Also many of the "filters" sold that defeat copy protection are sold off shore now. I think the maker of the "Sima" device recently lost a court decision. And they are not as widely available as a result. Best Buy for example.


But what about a consumer level DVD recorder that may ignore copy protection as the result of a design flaw. If a consumer presses record and the process begins and then actually completes the recording without the "CP alert" is this a violation? A willful circumvention. I'm guessing probably yes but how does the consumer know? There is the famous warning on DVD's. But there is also the famous warning from the NFL about usage rights without the "express written concent" warning.


But. Finally my point. Finally. This could become more of a concern with "copy once" and "copy never" flags from cable or satellite sources that may be ignored with certain DVD recorders. How is a consumer to know? Especially if the consumer is not proactively placing a "filter" device between the source and the recorder.


It is confusing but I believe if you keep things under your own roof you will be fine.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart /forum/post/0


Once in the analog domain, the DMCA no longer applies. Copyright laws still apply of course, but so does the Fair Use Act.

So...would I be okay to copy my legally purchsed VHS tapes to DVD as long as I use analog (RCA) cables? Even if I use a filter?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobkart /forum/post/0


Once in the analog domain, the DMCA no longer applies. Copyright laws still apply of course, but so does the Fair Use Act.

So I gues this would fall under the domain of copying an owned DVD either through component, S-Video, or composite since these are all analog connections?


With a Sima/Grex unit in between a DVD player and a DVD recorderconnected via one of the above connections?
 

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Only digital copies are covered by the DMCA (hence the D). Copying a DVD by playing it back through analog A/V cables to a recorder isn't a digital copy. So "yes" to the preceding questions by crabboy and STEELERSRULE.


Disclaimer: I feel individuals should be able to legally make copies of material (CD/VHS/DVD for example) that they have purchased or otherwise legally obtained, for whatever reason, be it backup, convenience, change of medium, a copy to play in the car and keep the original more safe, a copy for the kids to destroy, etc. As long as the intent of the Copyright is not violated, that would be giving away or selling copies to others, for example. Evey so often when I point out the DMCA here at AVS Forums, someone tries to equate pointing out the law with agreeing with it. Hence this Disclaimer.
 

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I'm not saying Sima's position is defensible. I'm saying the DMCA doesn't apply to it. There could be something else that Sima is doing wrong.


This is my understanding, if someone knows better then by all means speak up.


The full text of the DMCA would help with these questions, if someone has a link . . . ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by crabboy /forum/post/0


A little more detail. If your computer has a DVD burner, find and install DVDecrypter, DVDShrink, or DVD Fab Decrypter. Any will make bit-for-bit copies and remove copy protection. This is legal if you are making one copy for your personal collection of movies that you bought legally. (This is my understanding - the laws may have changed).

Thanks for the info crabboy. This looks like it may be the easiest route to go. I may just get a decent standalone upconvert dvd player and then buy a dvd burner for my computer and use one of those programs. from the very brief overview of the programs i have done, it looks like dvd fab encrypter might be the easiest to use.


I just cant stand to let myself ruin another dvd from overuse or stupid things like dropping it or scratching it while loading or unloading only to be left with no back-up copy and be forced to unload another $20-25.


I've wised up a little in my college years and rarely even download music for free anymore, I simply believe if you truly want to support an artist, label, actor, etc. you should pay for that product. Once its yours, make as many copies as you want, as long as your not giving them away or selling them. Thats just my personal belief.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by DLSDO /forum/post/0


Yes.




The purpose of the forum is to exchange ideas and share knowledge. If everyone knew all the answers to all the questions we would not have a forum I suppose


Very true. If anyone needs and tips on nutrition or fitness I'm your answer guy. Electronics, not so much. But in any case i appreciate your help.
 

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Hope you guys don't mind another question from a newbie :)


I have a Cyberhome DVD player and I recently got the Panasonic DMR-EH75VS as a present. If I want to make back-up copies of my copyprotected DVDs by hooking up the Cyberhome to the Panasonic, do I need one of those video filter devices, or can I just program the Cyberhome to ignore the Macrovision (there are codes out there for that, or so I've been told)? Or will the Panasonic still be able to detect the copyprotection even if I "hack" my Cyberhome? Thanks!
 
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