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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am currently in the process of constructing a HT in my basement. There will be no exterior windows, the bedrooms are on the second floor, and the kids are gone to college so sound isolation shouldn't be a big issue... EXCEPT for the rumble of my oil-fired hot water furnace (which is located in the adjacent room in the basement). From what I've been reading, low frequency sounds are extremely hard to abate. I've read about things like staggered stud construction, acoustical mat, resilient channel, fiberglass insulation, bass traps, etc. and my question is - Will any of these techniques be more effective than others at mitigating low frequency noise, or am I fighting a lost cause?. I really don't want to spend the time and money on all these room techniques only to find out that it really didn't make much of a difference.


Should I focus instead on absorbent material directly around the furnace itself? As I mentioned earlier, the heat transfer medium is hot water, so ventilation duct noise is not an issue.
 

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First thing to consider before you do anything to/around the boiler is where does it draw it's combustion air from? Be careful what you do around the boiler itself, because you don't want to create a carbon monoxide problem.
 

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I have the exact same situation in my own home. In addition to the furnace I have a well pump that when it kick on is like a jet airplane. I have just completed room in room construction and it made a world of difference I still can hear the pump but is is very tolerable. I have done nothing inside of the utilities room aside from The homosote that was on that wall to begin with. So pick which ever side is easiest and do a complete double wall with double drywall on the furnace room preferably.
 

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YOu could always piggy back another well tank onto the system or replace with a much larger tank so as to increase drawdown. This way the pump will at least kick on less often. You can also build a large insulated box with a breather to enclose the pump. As long as you can get air flow to it, there won't be any problem of overheating.
 

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Pump Hush box...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Actually,


I was thinking of trying to build a "furnace hush box "(with air intakes, of course). I was thinking of using sheet metal with non-flammable egg crate foam. My concern is that there will need to be several holes in order to accommodate all of the inlet and outlet piping (2 heating zones, expansion tank, oil feed, plus domestic hot water, etc.). In addition, it needs to be easily removable for annual maintenance. Has anyone tried this? Am I wasting my time on this approach?


My concern with the double wall is that I will be loosing some precious space in an area where I really can't afford it. Also, what about the door? Seems to me that the door will be the weakest link in the chain, and adding a staggered wall won't do a thing to improve the doors abatement efficacy.
 

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I really think the "hush box" would be alot of work. Dont forget you will have to treat the ductwork in and out as well. Do you have room in the furnace room to treat the adjacent wall? You can change the Door to an exterior if it will not effect your air supply to the room.
 
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