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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I would like to snap a couple of screen shots , how are these done? I am thinking about buying a 640x480 digital camera for this or is this a bad idea or does it depend on the camera?

Some of you guys have taken really beautiful screen shots.


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James' DIY Speakers
 

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I would imagine that you would want a camera that has at least the resolution of the projector. You can pick up 2Megapixel cameras pretty cheap now.


I think 640x480 would be a waste of time.


My proj has a freeze mode. I am going to take a few using that and see how it comes out (I have a 2.1 mp camera)


-maynard
 

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Taking projector photos rule of thumb:

1) Darkened room.

2) Set your ISO to the highest your camera can do (400 or higher is best) to let in more light.

3) Use tripod if you can get one as image tend to blur if your hands are shaky with higher ISO.

4) No flash as it'll just wash out your picture.

5) Pause image of DVD movie otherwise moving image will blur.

6) Use LCD view screen of camera as it's more accurate than the viewfinder (generally).

7) If your camera has delayed shutter release (timer--the kind that let you run from the tripod to get in the picture), use it if you're using a tripod to minimize shaking of camera.

8) List screen size/type/gain (96"X54", DIY blackout material, 1.1 gain), distance from screen that photo is taken from, light condition (darkened room, readable light, etc.), projector specs (XGA, LCD, 550 lumens), source (STB Toshiba interlaced or progressive DVD player, HTPC, DVDo, Quadscan, etc.), input type (via VGA, Svideo, component, composite), type and resolution of camera (2 megapixels, Nikon Coolpix 800, resolution set on standard, medium, or high quality, on tripod, ISO settings, etc.), and photo size (JPG at 20k) to warn downloader of time of download and compression artifacts.

9) Explanation of photos (your impressions) as picture is only a taste of what the true picture is like.


I think if you were to get into digital photography, don't waste your money on VGA as it's not adequate. You should get a least a 1 megapixel ($200) or higher. Good luck :)


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Any hints as to how to do it with the old-fashioned "film" camera. I've tried with no flash, and I still get an extremely washed-out picture.


Is it just useless without a digital camera?



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DVI/HDCP makes your HDTV not ready
 

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 http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/a7a09...4vD77AADP67cJu

http://us.f1.yahoofs.com/users/a7a09...4vD77Ab3rvDpP.


there were taken with a Sony XGA digicam ( don't know the ref, a friend brought it with him), with a tripod and no room light. he did not use any flash but lengthen the exposure time a bit to absorb enough light from the screen.

The image is from my lcd (479x455.... don't laugh) through an rgb external decoder. the screen is a 120" wide Dalite 1.2 screen.


in case photos don't show up, here's my link: http://photos.yahoo.com/huntforprofit


[This message has been edited by David600 (edited 09-09-2001).]
 

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should go without saying, but..


make sure you select and pause a scene where there is NO movement from either the film camera (panning / zooming) or the subject matter


also, be aware that some digital cameras produce a lot of digital 'noise' and/or stuck pixels when set to higher ISO and used for long exposures. in that xase, try ISO 80 or 100 as well.
 
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