AVS Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,819 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This recent post:
Quote:
Originally Posted by hansiz /forum/post/16982575


This is a (chuckle) business opportunity?! LOL



...The guys that do 8mm to dv conversion make the big bucks too. -sarcasm

in this recent thread: VHS to DVD business opportunity


...reminded me once again that besides the 100's of VHS tapes that I may or may not ever get around to converting to digital, I *ALSO* have a few dozen 8mm (and a couple Super 8mm) 50' reels of "Home Movies".


IIRC, the last time I looked (~10+ years ago), the 'most inexpensive' device I found was a 'box with mirrors' for ~$50. Point the 8mm projector in one end and point the 'digital camera' into the other (at a 90 degree angle).


IMHO, the question of 'VHS-to-DVD' has pretty much been 'asked-and-answered' (to death) but I don't recall seeing too much about '8mm Film-to-Digital'. (A major problem I had when GOOGLEing for '8mm-to-Digital' was the re-use of the 8mm 'nomenclature' for digital camcorders.
)


If you've done this:
  • HOW did you do it?
  • Would you do it differently today?
  • How much did it cost (for any 'special' equipment)?
  • Suggestions / comments / etc...

Thanks!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,530 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by ClearToLand /forum/post/16984931


...reminded me once again that besides the 100's of VHS tapes that I may or may not ever get around to converting to digital, I *ALSO* have a few dozen 8mm (and a couple Super 8mm) 50' reels of "Home Movies".


IIRC, the last time I looked (~10+ years ago), the 'most inexpensive' device I found was a 'box with mirrors' for ~$50. Point the 8mm projector in one end and point the 'digital camera' into the other (at a 90 degree angle) . . .


Suggestions / comments / etc...

I've never dealt with film so I have no suggestions.


The "most inexpensive" device (you mentioned) sounds like a variation upon the kinescope process used to preserve live TV shows back in the early 1950s.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
35 Posts
You can just project it on a screen and shoot it with a HD camera, like those camcorder shot in the theatre movies to buy on the street. The next is to pay about $10 to $15 per 50 foot reel xfer to dvd, by the dozens of outfits that come up on a google. The best is to find the fanatic guy that does the xfer to miniDV. DVD is a bit too lossey for 8mm. The technique to transfer 8mm to DV is the trick. It'll have a higher bit rate being in DV than MPEG2. VHS to DVD doesn't 'suffer' as much. Maybe 8mm to blu-ray will be around the corner next year.

Good luck, and if your film starts to smell like vinegar, hurry, its starting to go.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,265 Posts
As mentioned above, I've heard transferring to miniDV is the way to go because of the higher bit rate. Then use this as a master to burn a DVD disc, or a Blu-ray.


That being said, my friend recently transferred some 8mm film to DVD-R. He said he tried using one of those 'box with mirrors', but said the bulb made a bright spot in the middle of the picture. So he projected the film onto a flat surface & recorded the home movie with his Sony digital 8 video camera & then edited on his PC. I saw the finished product on a LCD flat panel TV, which was about 25" to 30" in size. I thought it turned out pretty good. He even added fades and background music.


If you have a digital video camera, all it would cost to try this approach is to buy a piece of flat white foam board from your local craft store. Output the camera video to a large screen HDTV and see how it looks. If you like the results then you would have to get some editing software & somehow get the video into a computer. I can get more details if you want.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,653 Posts
I agree with the flat white foam board trick. I tried one of those box with mirrors many years ago when converting 8mm to VHS and I also got the "hot" spot in the middle.

The downside of the foam board method is your room must be basically dark, with the mirror device it doesn't need to be dark in the room.

While the DV idea may be more loss less than direct to DVD, to me most of my 8mm tapes weren't the best quality so I'd actually prefer it to be filtered a bit by the DVD. I suppose 16mm film might have the resolution that would benefit from DV but personally I don't think 8mm would justify it, but that's your call.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top