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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi Again


I am using the Porter Cable power drywall sander from HD for the bulk of the sanding, a Sand-n-Clean dustless sander (the thing with the water bucket) for most of the hand sanding, and drwall sponges for the corners and tight areas. Even with the Porter Cable and the Sand-n-clean, I am creating a lot of dust.


So, what do you do after you are done sanding? Is it best to sweep up the dust in piles and vaccuum it up, or should I grab my wife's vaccuum and just vaccuum the floor? Sweeping does not seem to really work as it kicks up a lot of dust and also the broom leaves a lot behind.


How do you clean you walls. If I run my hands over a sanded seam, it is very dusty. Do I need to remove this before priming? If so, what is the best way? A giant lint remover would be perfect. :)


Regards,

- Hal
 

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I'm using a hand sander attached to my shopvac which picks up ~98% of the dust. The rest (which is minimal) will be swept or vacuumed up with the same shopvac.


A word of warning about using your wife's vacuum to vacum up the dust. I've read that you shouldn't use a regular vacuuum clean large amounts of drywall dust as the dust can get inside the motor bearings ade ruin your vacuum.


I just finished priming the Theater Room in which the joints were sanded. I didn't do any cleaning, but I did use the hand vac and my primer went on fine.
 

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I used my shopvac with a special drywall dust bag on it, and it worked

like a charm. One tip is to create a humid environment when you are

sanding, the dust will fall to the floor quicker. For me, since I did it

in the sauna we call August in Virginia, I just had to open the garage

and basement doors... for others that would mean a humidifier!


--

Tom
 

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We usually cover the entire floor with red rosin paper before mudding then after the sanding we just roll up the whole thing and bag it. A shop vac is best for end cleanup. You will have to shake out the filter once or twice during the process. Remove most of the wall dust with a floor tool on the shop vac. Be careful not to gouge the patched areas. You can also blow off the walls with an air compressor or leaf blower but only if you have a sealed room as it will go everywhere. A minor amount of dust will not effect the painting. A good latex primer coat will take care of it.
 

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No. Give the wall a LIGHT wipe down and paint it with Kilz. They make a laytex product now. It will lock all that stuff down. Trust me on this. Did my whole house with the product. My seams all felt like yours before I used it.
 

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Having been in the paint business for years (retail/manufacturing) I can tell you that a light coating of dust will not effect the finish coat. The best way to cleanup is with a slightly damp sponge, then prime the walls with a PVA drywall primer, it must say "PVA" somewhere on the can or you run the risk of re-activating the drywall mud and having it fall. Normal latex primers (Kilz Latex, Kilz II, Zinsser 1-2-3) will not stop the drywall mud from being reactivated by your paint. PVA stands for Poly Vinyl Acrylic, basically Elmers Glue. It is very cheap and easy to put on. 5 gallons is $30.00 and it covers 400sqf per gallon.
 

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Really r8ingbull?


I have found that using any amount of water and pressure on already dried mud will reactivate it and in some cases even cause it to fail and valley. I have always used Kilz (oil based before the Kilz II latex came out) and never had a problem with the bud being reactivated. But perhaps then again the “TYPE†of paint matters as well. I there is much to be said about the extra 10 to 15 bucks per gallon of GOOD quality paint. It DOES make a HUGE difference the end result. Just my 2 cents.


Follow this link:
http://www.masterchem.com/pages/default.aspx?NavID=28


You have me wondering so I was doing research on PVA and this is all I found that made any sense. Do you have a better link? This is where I was looking: http://www.tileafrika.co.za/paint/co...crylic_pva.htm


Also r8ingbull please do no think I'm flameing you on this because I'm now. I'm sure you have been looking at this fourm for a long time like I have and everyone is only helpfull here. Just trying to see if I have been doing it wrong for 15 years. :(
 

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Sorry for the thread hijack, maybe we should start a new thread.


The links are OK, I don't have any better right now. I think the Paint Africa thing is a paint and not a primer. Something else I forgot is that PVA primers hold colorant better then most. This is important for HT use because of the dark colors. A very dark red can be achieved in just one coat if the primer is tinted properly. Same with black

Quote:
water and pressure on already dried mud will reactivate it and in some cases even cause it to fail and valley
You are right on. When I said a slightly damp sponge I should have been more clear. What I meant was a sponge with every bit of water you can taken out. If the sponge is wet enough to leave a visible trail on the wall it is too wet.



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the extra 10 to 15 bucks per gallon of GOOD quality paint. It DOES make a HUGE difference the end result. Just my 2 cents
Right again, The price of paint is made up of three basic factors. Almost all paints are priced this way

1. Advertising

2. Titanium Dioxide (this is the binding agent and the white color, also supplies the ability to cover other colors)

3. Markup during distribution.


I always recommend that paint be bought from a facility that also owns the distribution and manufacturing facility, Some of these that I kow of are Ben Moore, True Value, Ace Hardware. Here is an example of how this works:


Home Depot wants to sell a gallon of paint for $21.99 and make $9.00 on it. They pay Manufacture "x" 13.99. Manufacture needs $6.00 profit so they take and use $8.99 worth of materials (mainly Titanium Dioxide)


Wholely owned company:

Wants to sell for $21.99 and make $7.00 profit. Pays manufacture $14.99, since manufacturing facility does not need to turn a profit, just cover losses, they use $14.99 worth of supplies.


These numbers are almost the exact figures from the industry. The difference between $8 profit at HD and $7 other places is advertising. In some areas it is much, much higher. Then add in payments to Martha Stewart and Ralph Lauren and it goes even higher.


Quote:
I have always used Kilz (oil based before the Kilz II latex came out) and never had a problem
Kilz is kind of a Jack Of All Trades, it does everything well (just don't get the oil based, that stuff is aweful) but does nothing great. It is a good primer if you are only getting one primer to do lots of stuff with, but other products specially made for individual jobs usually work better.


Quote:
Also r8ingbull please do no think I'm flameing you on this because I'm now. I'm sure you have been looking at this fourm for a long time like I have and everyone is only helpfull here.
Not taken as a flame, I have been reading this forum for awhile now. I finally found a question I could answer or help with. I just finished the framing on my HT last night. I am going to begin electrical tonight. Pictures to follow soon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the great replies. I don't mind my thread being hijacked, as long as it goes somewhere I want to go. :) Priming will be next.


Here is a funny story. I am creating lots of dust, even when using the Porter Cable sander. There is a filter that you have to clean every so ofter by snapping then handle that is outside the vac. So, I have been doing that and still cursing the amount of dust that is created. So, finally, I opened the vac and looked at the filter. There was no filter, just a plastic frame for one. When I turn on the vac, dust just spews out the back of the vac. Also, I am not using a bag, because the HD guy said I didn't need to. Grrrrr.....Grrr....Grrr.... Well, at least it sands nice, but it is like working in a cloud. I will call HD tomorrow.


Regards,

- Hal
 

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Having put up a lot of art exhibitions (similar construction and requirements for cleanliness and finish), I have always found that I needed to get rid of construction dust before painting. Otherwise it would add texture to the paint put on the walls, which would get progressively worse as the paint in the tray and the rollers got more contaminated.


Brush down the walls with a soft broom or cheap feather duster, sweep all the dust on the floor into one big pile and shovel it into a bag to dispose of, then go to lunch. When you come back an hour or so later, the dust in the air will have also settled on the floor (as well as everything else in the room), and you can then use a vacuum cleaner to get rid of the remainder.


Being thorough about cleaning up makes it easier to paint. It can also be a moral boost because it marks the point at which the messy construction is finished.
 

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Thanks very much for your insight r8ingbull. You seem to know what your doing. Your response was very well written and I learned something new.


Sorry nobail for doing this again but seeing as we all have r8ingbulls attention on this tread I need to ask one more question. Directed at him. You might all find this discovery very helpful and very exciting.


I was at my parents last night and talking to my dad about how much I wanted to have a cool looking tin ceiling in our basement home theater. He told me about a product called anaglypta and that his company had actually done a few ceiling with it before with absolutely amazing results. The website of the product is http://morrisstuff.com/supadurable.htm . Have you used this? Do you know about it?
 

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Anaglypta is basically paintable wallpaper. It tends to be very expensive because it is a cotton/paper blend, similar to money. Also try looking for "Lincrusta" it is a similar product.


If you want a cheaper solution just go to a wallpaper store and buy a few rolls of paintable wallpaper ($13 for 56 square feet). It has a raised texture and is perfect for hiding problems on a wall. The only problem I see with a look alike tin ceiling is getting a paint that matches the shine and mettalic effect of real tin. Try Rust-Oleum Hammered finish. It is available in sprays and quarts. I used it on my door hinges, it was a fairly good match for brushed aluminum. I am sure they have other colors also. It leaves a cool texture that might look good.
 

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I have seen some of the pintable wallpaper at the HD. I really did not like it all that much. It felt kinda mushy if you know what I mean. I was afraid that if you pushed up against it- the finish would lose its texture.


How do you attach that paper to the ceiling? I hear that some actually staple it. I think I would rather attach it with a decent wallpaper paste. What do you think? Cool call on the hammered paint. I will check that out.
 

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Personally I hate installing wallpaper and would hire it done,


Here are the instructions off a roll of Brewster brand wall covering:


Over non-painted or low sheen surface:

1. Clean walls

2. Prime with PVA latex primer

3. Prime with Shieldz by Zinsser (use white only)

4. Apply wallpaper using appropriate wallpaper paste, sizing should not be necasary (sp?)


Over painted or high sheen surface

1. Apply wallpaper using appropriate paste, sizing may be needed


After you apply the paper I would finish it with paint ASAP because is absorbes odors and stains very quickly. I think most textured/paintable wallcovering have to be primed with oil based primer and top coated with latex paint.


By the way your link doesn't work for me. These textured papers seem to be very popular in the UK. That is the only place I have ever seen an entire wall done. I usually see it here as borders, dados, or frescos. If you do use it on your ceiling let us know how it turns out.
 

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Try that link again. I think it's fixed now. How that hammerd metal paint would be really cool looking on that paper. Does the quart stuff look as good as the spray?
 
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