AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
im thinking about lasik, I HATE wearing glasses. Can anyone tell me how the procedure affects movie viewing in a dark room?


right now, I am kinda fed up with all the glare that comes with wearing glasses.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,227 Posts
Well sharp vision would certainly lead to more perceived screen door effect http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/biggrin.gif ...


I am being a little facetious as in truth the better your eyes the better you can perceive the image... As to the implications of eye surgery I am unaware of drawbacks of surgery...


I have a very very slight shortsightedness... and it means I can run a larger screen on my SVGA DLP before I see the screen door / pixellation that others can !!!


------------------

[email protected]
HTPC without using windows... GUI Front Ends for Home Theater
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
I've had Lasik for nearly 3 years now. I don't have any distortion or viewing issues related to the surgery. Certainly nothing like the old horror stories of the Karotonomy slits they used to cut. I wouldn't think twice about it - from my chair here, everything's clear as a bell!


ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,066 Posts
I had Eximer eye surgery 6 years ago, and it never healed properly. From time to time, the scar re-opens, it hurts like hell, and my vision is blurry for a few hours or sometimes a full day.

Lasik is supposed to be more secure than Eximer, but if I had to do it again, I would keep the glasses.


------------------

Robert
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
59 Posts
I too am considering this procedure. My brother had it done in Atlanta and has had great results. His vision is actually better, I think he told me 20/16. I do wonder if he would be able to see more of the pixilization effects.


I'll probably have mine done in july some time. I hate wearing glasses/contacts. Not being able to see in the morning, having to be careful in the water, etc.


Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
457 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by Phat Phreddy:


...

I have a very very slight shortsightedness...

I may have extreme near-sightedness, but I can correct that with contact lenses. However, only my wife has ever accused me of short-sightedness http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


Sorry Phat, I couldn't resist!




------------------

DVI/HDCP makes your HDTV not ready
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,679 Posts
First of all: LASIK is not magic!


As with any surgery there are risks, and drawbacks. While it is relatively low risk compared to some other surgery there's still risk. Before you submit yourself and your eyes to the care of a surgeon I suggest you visit www.surgicaleyes.org . I especially recommend you have a look at the image center at that site. I'm not saying you shouldn't have the procedure done - I only recommend you educate yourself first.


For HT use there are a couple of points you should be aware of first. The most important one is pupil size. If you have relatively large pupils then you risk living with permanent ghosting, halos, starry vision, and glare. This is especially evident in low light situations such as in a home theater. What's happening is that the laser has only a limited focal area (which varies from laser to laser - some clinics use lasers with a much wider beam) - and thus you get a border between treated, and untreated areas of the cornea. In normal light this is not usually a problem, but in low light the pupil dilates to a point where you get serious refraction errors in the border area leading to the above mentioned problems. If you're unlucky you might have what's called irregular astigmatism and you'll have those problems even in daylight. Make sure your doctor/surgeon checks for this before performing the procedure. Also make sure they measure your dilated pupil size. Ask what it was if necessary. Higher myopes are more at risk as the laser beam needs to be more focused - thus what's not a large pupil for a normal person might be too large for a satisfactory surgery. There's a pupil calculator somewhere at www.lasikprk.com you can use to determine somewhat what it might look like after lasik in low light situations.


Some people also have trouble with dry eyes (which can be painful) after the operation. One theory tries to explain this by saying that the procedure slices some nerves for the tear ducts and you get reduced tear production. People with low tear production should not undergo the procedure. If you can't wear contacts for some reason - you shouldn't undergo the procedure either.


You should also be aware that there are no guarantees on how well your vision will become. People with high astigmatism and myopia have a limited ability to get "perfect vision", while hyperopes must have even lower numbers. There's also the personal part - how good is good enough. Can you live with slightly imperfect vision, or must it be perfect?


Make sure you absolutely trust your doctor/surgeon. Ask them how they'll handle complications. Ask them what the risk numbers are. Ask them how many procedures they've done. Ask them how many of those were termed unsuccessful. If the answer to that is: no risk, no complications, less than 300 operations - any of those answers should tell you to turn around and walk out that door.


Whatever they may tell you eye surgery is a complicated issue that should not be jumped into lightly.


That's the general comments I have for now - there's plenty more, however this should serve as a beginning. Do read those links I sent you - they give you no-******** factual information. If anyone has any specific questions don't hesitate to mail me.


Now my personal history with LASIK so far:


I started doing research on this procedure a little over a year ago. I read everything I could find on the net - personal accounts of good results, and bad results. I also read some of the support forums for people who had suffered bad results. I especially took care to read the accounts of the bad results - sort of a shock treatment, learn all the stuff that might go wrong. Well informed with the pros and cons I decided to undergo the procedure for my left eye only. When the left eye had sufficiently healed I would do the right eye.


The procedure itself was painless due to anestesia - discomfort when they added suction to the eye to slice the flap necessary to have access for the laser, but that was about it. Half an hour after the operation the anesthetics started to wear off. My eye felt like I had sand in it. Itched a lot. They put a plastic eyeshield over my eye so I wouldn't scratch. Slept most of the day, tired after the operation. Then came a couple of weeks of various eyedrops. Eye itched from time to time. My vision gradually improved, but unfortunately not to a point where I could see decently. After a couple of weeks the doc came to the conclusion that I was undercorrected. I was measured to -1.25 with no astigmatism compared to -5.5 with 0.75 in astigmatism before. I decided to undergo a second procedure to correct what was left. This second procedure could not be performed until 3 months since the first procedure due to the eye's need to heal enough.


The next three months was a real bugger. I couldn't use a contact lense on my operated eye, nor could I use glasses because the difference in the myopia of my eyes would mean I'd get a size issue with everything I saw. So I ended up with using a contact lens on my right eye and nothing in the left. Don't get me started on the tension headaches I got from my left eye trying to focus when there was no possible way for it to get focussed. During this three month period I also got a small bacterial infection in the eye. Hurt a lot, go to doctor - get new eyedrops, fixed.


The next procedure went pretty much as the first one did - except no keratome as they could just use the flap already cut from the last operation. Then home, sleep, eyedrops for a couple of weeks. The real problem was that in my checkups they measured no refractive error anymore - I was 0.0 with no astigmatism - but I had real trouble seeing with the eye. Everything was foggy - even the large letters. After a little while I got the surgeon to have a relook at it and they diagnosed is as the body having a delayed reaction from the infection I had earlier. They explained it in laymans terms as the cells actually attacking cells in my eye. When they looked at it in those instruments of theirs it appeared as if my eye had a milky white film all over.They put me on a heavy steroid drop regime for two weeks - it actually helped. It helped clear up the worst of the white parts, but it was still possible to see small white spots here and there. Because you can't go on steroid drops for a long time without upsetting the pressure in the eye they stopped that treatment. Instead they told me to give it time to heal.


And here I am - almost one year later. My eye has healed considerably but I still have slightly blurred vision. I expect it to get better though. I still haven't had the procedure done on my right eye - waiting a while more. I'm glad I only did one eye at a time as it has allowed me to function (though at a reduced capacity) during the worst healing periods when I could see very little. Healing from LASIK can take time - for some like me it takes a long time, while for others it's only a short period. YMMV even here. Different people heal and react differently to the procedure. I will have the right eye done too - just not yet. I do not regret doing it in the first place as I feel that I've educated myself first and made a conscious informed choice. My only real problem with HT viewing is that if there's a dark scene with white text - I get a halo around the text. I'm thinking of getting a bias lamp though to compensate.


This personal account in no way mentions the psychological stress I was under during the worst periods. Would my eye get well? Did a do something wrong when I accidentally tried to scratch the itch I was having? Was my eye damaged beyond repair? It was extremely scary - and if you're not prepared to undergo that kind of stress, then don't have surgery. That was also the reason I read so much beforehand - understand what's happening and it's easier to deal with.


Should you undergo Lasik surgery? That's up to you to decide. I urge you to read up on everything though so you can make an informed consent - and not go into it blindly and get an ugly surprise if something goes wrong.


------------------

/frode
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
I had Lasik eye surgery back in OCT/95 in Toronto(both eyes done at the same time). I have since had 20/20 vision with no regression. I had night vision problems for about 2 years after the procedure( Not bad but noticeable). Today the night vision problems are very minor and only bother me when I have severe allergy problems. Once in a while when watching movies I may see some halos with high contrast images.(Like the letters in the end credits). When I purchased the Da-lite high power screen it virtually went away. The added brightness made my pupils close over more so I was no longer looking thought the laser surgery scar tissue around the eyes. (That's what causes the night vision problems)

Overall I am happy with the Lasik surgery and I would do it again.


Avery


------------------

My HT Pics http://members.aol.com/thxavery/


[This message has been edited by thxave (edited 06-12-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I had LASIK surgery in January of 2000, and I remember the first thing I saw after taking the post-operative nap was the 65 inch screen in my living room. Though my eyes were a little itchy, it was remarkably clear. Within 2 days, I had no noticable problems other than a slight sensitivity to light. Since then, my vision has settled at around 20/20, and I only notice a slight halo effect (a little glare at night) that is no worse than it was with my contacts and occasional dryness in my eyes. I am amazed at the 3D appearance of material on my television now.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
402 Posts
I had Lasik 18 months ago, corrected 20/200 left and 20/75 right to about 20/40 left and 20/30 right. not quite perfect, but I have no need for glasses now, and with both eyes compensating for one another, I get really close to 20/20 in the real world.

I haven't had any (noticeable) reduction in my night vision (it's always been above average), nor did I ever see starbursts, halos (I used to get those with contacts though), or extra glare. My eyes are a little drier than they used to be though - a regular regimen of drops would likely help me see a little clearer.

The only huge problem I've noticed is increased difficulty re-focusing after staring at my laptop screen (14.1" active matrix - abot as easy on the eyes as you can get) to long distances. For example, if I'm reading the forum in my room for an hour, then look up at the TV (27" at 14 feet) I can't read the TiVo descriptions until I blink a few times and give it 20 seconds or so. Then again, this probably has to do with the dryness too...

At any rate, it is without a doubt, the single best thing I've ever treated myself to - everyone around me thought I was on drugs for weeks after the surgery because I was so happy about the results! I can't really explain the satisfaction of waking up and being able to read the clock on my Bose wave from across the room... It's almost magical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
354 Posts
When I had my last eye exam (May), I discussed LASIK with my ophthalmologist out of curiosity. He is a professional colleague I've known for over thirty years, and I completely trust his information. He gave me a four page document he wrote describing refractive surgery "warts and all". One statement in the paper says, "If you are a perfectionist, do NOT have this operation." He told me he strongly discourages people who are dependent on 20/20 vision from having a LASIK procedure, as 1 in 75 will lose "two lines on the chart"...enough to put a pilot, for example, out of work.


He hands out this information to anyone interested, and noted that the response after reading it depends completely on the amount of risk that person is willing to take. Some say, "Sign me up!" and ask no more questions. He said to me, "I know you are not a risk-taker, and I would be amazed if you decided to have a LASIK procedure after reading this." He was right. I'm 63, and retired. I don't like my glasses any better than anyone else, but I elect to take zero risk where my eyes are concerned.


------------------
Bill Bunker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
423 Posts
Oh, well, I guess I had to wade in on this one. Here's what I tell my patients:


LASIK (Laser In Situ Keratomileusis) can be a miraculous procedure for some people, dramatically, nearly instantly changing their entire lives, by allowing them to function without glasses. The great majority of patients are happy with their outcome.


It is, however, not right for everyone.


While it can correct distance vision, it is unable to correct presbyopia, the age related decline in near focusing ability that afflicts us all, usually beginning in our mid forties.


Many myopic (nearsighted) people can continue to read and see up close without glasses for their entire lives, because their eyes are relaxed up close, and do not have to actively focus. When they have LASIK, they become just like the rest of the 'normal' people, and gradually lose their near focusing ability.


As we age, the ability to see clearly up close becomes more and more important, especially as our activities become more limited. The superior near vision of the nearsighted person can offset the effects of eye disease, and allow good near function as old age and more limited activity set in. If you have LASIK, you lose this advantage.


So there's a trade off, diminished near vision for improved distance vision, and it's hard to understand how it feels to be unable to focus up close until it happens to you.


Whether that trade off is right for you depends on a number of factors, among them how nearsighted you are, what kind of activities are most important to you, and how old you are.


If, like Piggy in "Lord of the Flies" you are young and so dependant on your glasses that if they broke you'd starve to death because you couldn't find your food, LASIK could well save your life.


If, at the other extreme, you are old, forgetful, and couldn't see to eat if you misplaced your reading glasses, you might be better off being nearsighted. At least you can see your food.


Most of us fall somewhere between these extremes, and the decision must be individualized.


I, myself, am in my early 50's, mild to moderately nearsighted (-1.50, both eyes).


When I was in my 20's and 30's, I resented wearing glasses or contacts.


When I hit my mid 40's, I became less able to see up close with my glasses on, fine without them.


Today, I still see fine up close, while most of my friends need reading glasses. I've got no glasses on while I'm typing this.


Moreover, my distance vision is not really as bad as I once thought. I can function, if I have to, and get around without my glasses on. As a single guy (again), I can see a woman across the table from me in a restaurant just fine, and don't have to whip out a pair of specs to read the menu. I don't have a pair of "readers" dangling from my neck.


If one of my colleagues said to me "Poof, you're no longer nearsighted", with no surgery, no chance of complications, instant results, I'd say "No, thanks". I'm functioning better than I would be if my distance vision were perfect, both for work, and most of my play. I can get it for free from the best LASIK surgeons around. I haven't. Not because I'm afraid of it, but because I think I'm better off this way.


Personally, I think it might be worth it if you're beyond a -4.00 or so, the point at which you're in trouble without your glasses, and have to hold things really close to read without them, so you're wearing reading glasses anyway. LASIK really can change your life.


Your age enters into it as well. If you're 25, you'll have 20 good years before you need reading glasses. Maybe worth it. If you're 38, you'll have only 6 or 7 good years, maybe you should keep your glasses. Depends on just how thick they are. Get it?


For many people the trade off comes at a lower number, for many, a higher number. Just remember, it's not a panacea, and you have to understand the whole picture when you make the decision whether or not to have LASIK.


All of the above assumes no complications. Generally the procedure is safe and effective, and the large majority of patients are happy with their result. There are, however, a small percentage of patients who will be forever miserable, even in the hands of the best surgeon. Put that into your equation, too. You pays your money and you takes your chances. Good luck.


To sum it all up, yes, LASIK can change your life. Just not right for everyone. Be informed.



Richard E. Charney, M.D.

New York, New York




[This message has been edited by drmyeyes (edited 06-12-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,840 Posts
I ended up with 20/15 with my lasik and I have less vision distortion and haze than my contacts used to produce. for my own persoanl results, I can only report complete satifaction.


ken
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,286 Posts
My wife had it done, and she's very happy. Her vision is much improved. She says she does have worse night vision, though - I think that's a common complaint. That would probably help with HT viewing, though! Just make sure you use the best surgeon you can find.


For more than you'd ever want to know about it, check out EyeKnowWhy . Warning - it's mostly negative.


- Dave
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
109 Posts
Digitalhorde I had the Lasik treatment 2 years ago and would recommend it to anybody with glasses. See you local Lasik surgery and they can give you an idea of what they can/or can't do for you. Check out a few web pages a lot of info from people who go through it is out there. The results are immediate but settling can last for up to two years or more and fine adjustments can still be made for extream cases. As to your question the effects on viewing in a dark room is no different except everything is in focus now which is much nicer.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
385 Posts
DigitalHorde, I had LASIK done two years ago. Went from 20/200 to 20/15 which is better than normal. I keep reminding myself that lasik was the best video upgrade I have done, not to mention the awesome everyday eyesight I get!


I really do think that one must practice staring at a particular spot on the ceiling in anticipation of the lazer. Two days before I had my procedure, I would stare at a small point in the ceiling trying not to have any eye movement-Difficult but definately possible and infact a learned behavior. I feel this was what gave me my current eyesight what it is. Remember, the lazer does not make mistakes, only the operator and the patient are the variables.


There is a new type of LASIK that moves as ones eyes move. I think this is a great idea. See if one is near you.


However.....do expect about 3-6 months of some ghosting, exaggerated starburst image from oncomming traffic at night. It is said the cornea heals in about a year.


Jaime
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
350 Posts
30 years old. Before surgery: Left eye -4.25, Right eye -4.50. After first surgery: Left eye 20/40, Right eye 20/25. After second surgery: Left eye 20/20, Right eye 20/20. Got LASIK surgery Feb this year.


It's the BEST tweak, upgrade one can get. I've never used contact lenses only eye glasses. Oh, the feeling of being able to get up in the morning and turn on the TV without fumbling for your eyeglasses first and then the remote. The feeling of being able to have a haircut and be able to read newspaper. Simple things we take for granted.


Make sure the machine is the latest, it's the excimer laser with eye tracker. It uses guided missile technology used by NASA. The laser can track your eye in case you move it so it's not necessary to clamp your eye (yuck) and your head. You won't have the desire to blink or twitch your eye since the apply anesthesia eyedrops.


Surgery takes 10 minutes per eye, laser is fired less than 60 seconds per eye in most cases. Rest for 30 minutes then go home and sleep for 6 hours. After 6 hours vision is already clear. After 24 hours you go can resume normal activities.


A month after surgery my left eye had astigmatism of -1.50. Doctor said it was a rare case (I was the third patient of 600 who had re-surgery.) and said re-surgery was possible. First time you inquire about it, they'll tell you there's minimal risk, and when you say you opt for re-surgery, they tell you about risks (maybe because it's still under 1 year warranty and free). Second surgery was last May and now have 20/20 vision on both eyes, last check-up was 2 weeks ago.


Been wanting to have LASIK as early as three years ago but I read about the laser tracker technology (3rd generation) in TIME or NEWSWEEK magazine and decided to wait for a couple more years. The wait is definitely worth it.


Technology has significantly improved now so the horror stories you heard 2-3 years ago are much more unlikely to occur. There were some who had LASIK using the 2nd generation lasers (latest is 3rd gen) and after surgery, their eyes and faces look like someone beat them.


My GrayHawk screen has arrived and deciding which projector to purchase. Like I said, it's the BEST system upgrade.


------------------

Walter
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
380 Posts
It would partly depend on how large your pupils are and how much they dilate in a darkened room. If the pupil diameter at night or in a darkened room is larger than the optical zone of the laser there could be some edge glare since the light rays entering the pupil outside the laser optical zone would be refracted differently. Ask your ophthalmologist since they can measure that as part of the preoperative workup.


Also for the person who said it will be either lasik or bifocals please remember that the laser cannot correct for presbyopia (aging eyesight). If you are presbyopic the laser can correct the refractive error only i.e. nearsightedness or astigmatism. So if you elect to have good distance vision you would still need glasses for reading. You could elect monovision i.e. one eye corrected for distance vision and the other corrected for near vision, but that would result if some loss of depth perception. Personally I would not want monovision because I would want both eyes focused razor sharp on that HDTV image.

Larry
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
473 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I am near sighted, I can read my computer screen just fine, but after about 3.5 feet out, stuff starts to blur. It is very hard to read like a road sign any further than about 50 yards. I don't know my vision number (like 20/200) or whatever, but my glasses are -1.5 in both eyes, and that is a 3 year old prescription, and I probably need a little more now.


I had perfect vision until I was 20 years old, and I just don't think I'll ever adjust to wearing glasses fully, and don't want to try contacts.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top