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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What the rule of thumb on how far back to sit from a 16x9 inch screen? I.e., if the screen is 10' wide, what's the optimal sitting point? What's too close? What's too far? Is it linear (i.e., if the screen is 5' wide do all the answers change by 1/2)?


Thanks.
 

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Given a projection system without artifacts, I think about 2.9 heights is ideal. This means 1.23 widths for 2.35:1 movies, 1.56 widths for 1.85:1 sources, 1.63 widths for 1.77:1 sources, and 2.18 widths for most 4:3 sources.


1.5-1.6 screen widths is the compromise adopted by most people with 16:9 screens.


That would be 7.5' from a 5' wide screen and 15' from a 10' wide screen.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Drew Eckhardt
Given a projection system without artifacts, I think about 2.9 heights is ideal. This means 1.23 widths for 2.35:1 movies, 1.56 widths for 1.85:1 sources, 1.63 widths for 1.77:1 sources, and 2.18 widths for most 4:3 sources.


1.5-1.6 screen widths is the compromise adopted by most people with 16:9 screens.


That would be 7.5' from a 5' wide screen and 15' from a 10' wide screen.
Thanks, very helpful. One more question. How far back would that be from a 12' screen? :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by unclejr
1.5 * 12' = 18'


Take your screen size and multiply by 1.5 to determine optimal seeting (using this rule of thumb).


Does it work for odd numbers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Jamnett
He's joking
Correct. I was not joking about being thankful for the help (I really did want to know the ratios), only about the multiple examples of multiplying by 1.5!!


Having said that, erring on the side of assuming I'm clueless is not a bad strategy.
 

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grating, I checked your profile and noticed you had watt puppies so you do care alot about audio quality too, so you can't sit too close to your back wall when figuring your seating position or reflections will smear the detail of your puppies.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Originally posted by tpigeon2003
grating, I checked your profile and noticed you had watt puppies so you do care alot about audio quality too, so you can't sit too close to your back wall when figuring your seating position or reflections will smear the detail of your puppies.
Thanks, your posts have been incredibly helpful. Lots to think about!
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by thegratingone
Does it work for odd numbers?
New technology - "real" numbers, a significant advance over old "integer" technology!!!:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
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Originally posted by Morbius
New technology - "real" numbers, a significant advance over old "integer" technology!!!:)
Sorry, you're old news, I'm buying a Sony unit soon that does transcendental numbers...
 

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But you need to make your own choice. The rule of thumb is s starting point.


Mark
 

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So for 16:9 you don't use the diagonal measurement, you use the screen width?
 

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Quote:
So for 16:9 you don't use the diagonal measurement, you use the screen width?
This is an on-going debate, but the convention here seems to be screen width. The bottom line is this, for a 92" wide 16:9 AR screen, using the diagonal instead of the width amounts to about 1.5' further back and at that point, room permitting, you are going to tweak the seating distance anyway.
 

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So a 92" wide screen would have the dimensions of 92" x 51.75" with a 105.56" diagonal, and you should sit at least 11.5 feet away to resolve the screen door issue on a LCD projector?
 

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The rules of thumb are still just rules of thumb and personal preference will always win out. If you have a high quality projector and or low tolerance to screen door you can sit much closer. I have a Marantz VP12s2 and am highly susceptible to screen door and I sit 10 feet away from a 123 diagonal screen. I don't see any screendoor. The best thing to do is see the projector in person, get close enough so that you can definately see the screendoor, back away from the screen until the screendoor goes away; that becomes your minimum seating distance for that screen, that projector and that screen size. Now you have a starting point and any further going back will still not see any screendoor.
 

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I have no abilty to sit close regardless of quality or screen door. I just don't feel comfortable up close; it makes me dizzy.
 

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See, that's why is all a matter of preference. You have to see the projector in action and then see how close YOU are comfortable sitting. The rules of thumb are just there to give you a starting point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by jeffxjet
See, that's why is all a matter of preference. You have to see the projector in action and then see how close YOU are comfortable sitting. The rules of thumb are just there to give you a starting point.
Yeah, I know, that would be great, but it's not so easy to find places to demo all the combinations I want to see... Figured I'd start with opinions, build my theater, then pay a ton to redo it :)
 

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I'm brand new to front projectors and screens. Can someone please explain "screen door" for me? Thanks! I am planning my pre-wiring for speakers and video cables for my projector and am trying to get a rough idea of where my seating will be and approx where my projector will be based on screen size (and other unknown factors since I'm not even thinking about which brand/model to buy).
 
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