AVS Forum banner

1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I usually use EAC to create WAV files from CD. But then I have to fill in all the metadata info in iTunes manually. However if I use iTunes to create WAV files from CD, iTunes will gather the metadata automatically (yipee). My question is, how many people would trust the quality of a WAV file created with iTunes over EAC? Quality is of the utmost importance.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,329 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by htpc'd /forum/post/12935108


I usually use EAC to create WAV files from CD. But then I have to fill in all the metadata info in iTunes manually. However if I use iTunes to create WAV files from CD, iTunes will gather the metadata automatically (yipee). My question is, how many people would trust the quality of a WAV file created with iTunes over EAC? Quality is of the utmost importance.

I would be willing to bet (not a lot of money ...) that WAV files imported with iTunes would be exact copies of what's on a CD. I mean, it's pretty much copying the file over to the HDD. What's there to get wrong.


If quality is the most important thing, then WAV files would be best. However, WAV files are huge and you can use lossless compression to reduce the size without compromising quality. Apple Lossless would be good for you as well.


ft
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
I use Apple Lossless and just re-converted my 1000+ cd collection to the format. (with another copy in 192kbs MP3 for portability). I used iTunes to do so with error correction turned on.


Anyway, to MY EARS on my moderate Rotel/B&W HiFi setup I can't hear a difference between this (played via MacMini TOSLINK to Rotel unit) and a CD player input over Digital or Analog to the Rotel preamp.


Now maybe I don't have "golden ears" and my HiFi setup is in the moderate price range. You may have different standards. Also, my CDs are in excellent condition. This is one area where EAC may have an advantage, if you have CDs in bad shape.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thx for the input. Fortunately I'm not short on disk space. I've got 8tb running on a Solaris server that I built. My big thing is to archive music in as close to perfect a format as possible. Goal is to build a repository that could be formatted and transformed into any other format in the future. So more than what I may hear today, isn't as important as what would be possible in the future. I had a huge record collection at one time, but once you play vinyl that first time, the media is never perfect again. I'd like to keep my music collection this time pristine.


If anyones interested, the ZFS file system that's available through Solaris is great! You can do software raid directly in ZFS or do a software raid system on top of a hardware raid card configuration. And best thing, NO VOLUMES, no formatting etc. You can add disks in a JBOD fashion also at anytime. And ALL FREE!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
ZFS is solid. There were rumors that Apple OSX 10.5 would support it as default. Apple has a developer preview for this, so I can assume it is coming in the future. Maybe 10.6.


Obviously WAV is just the Raw data off the CD, but the down side there is tagging. That's the main reason I chose Apple Lossless. Keep in mind lossless codecs are lossless, and can be converted to any future format you wish. You can do some google searches for debates on the topic. Also, keep in mind a Mac uses AIFF, which is still the "raw" data, just like WAV. Think of AIFF as Apple's WAV.


One could argue it's "still digital" and it's not the pure signal, but I don't want to get into that whole analog/digital debate. CD's ARE only sampled at 44.1khz :)


You COULD always just play those records, ONCE, on a high end transport, through a super-high end DAC....


Have fun
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Top