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I am finally getting ready to upgrade my AV receiver to one that supports Dolby Atmos. I have been on the fence for quite some time.

I've kinda decided that I want both 4K and 8k passthrough or upscaling so this AVR lasts me a while. Any other features I should look at for relevance 6 years from now?

But to my question... how important is a difference of watts? 95 v 105? the price is a few hundred bucks and I'm wondering if it's worth it (I need to buy new Atmos speakers, after all).

This will be for 100% movies in a 7.1.2 set up. I do tend to watch at fairly high sound levels.

Speakers are all in the Klipsch Premiere Reference series (high sensitivity).

Thank you in advance.

p.
 

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It takes a doubling of watts to increase output by 3db. So if you have a 100 watt amp that produces 95db, you would need 200 watts to produce 98db.

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I am finally getting ready to upgrade my AV receiver to one that supports Dolby Atmos. I have been on the fence for quite some time.

I've kinda decided that I want both 4K and 8k passthrough or upscaling so this AVR lasts me a while. Any other features I should look at for relevance 6 years from now?

But to my question... how important is a difference of watts? 95 v 105? the price is a few hundred bucks and I'm wondering if it's worth it (I need to buy new Atmos speakers, after all).

This will be for 100% movies in a 7.1.2 set up. I do tend to watch at fairly high sound levels.

Speakers are all in the Klipsch Premiere Reference series (high sensitivity).

Thank you in advance.

p.
95 vs 105w doesnt really matter but the bigger powersupply might, especially if you like loud. A possible better solution would be an external amp for the front 2 or 3 channels to lessen the workload on the AVR a lot but you will need pre-outputs for that.(denon 3700 and up has that)
Speakers set to small with an appropriate crossover will also help by letting the sub do a lot of the heavy lifting.


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I just read this thread and found it very helpful. It might answer your question.

 
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This will help you understand how much wattage you need to power your speakers to your desired volume. Cumulative exposure to around 90 or more Db will cause permanent hearing loss.
Peak SPL Calculator. Good stuff to understand, hope it helps.
 

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OP - nope, the amount of watts you mentioned doesn't matter. You may even get by with 80watt amplification AVR. Several factors: your go to listening levels, your room dynamics, usage of a baffle wall
If you have well trained ears, you may notice a change in the sound from different brands of AVRs as they use different programing (if using it) and different components from whichever manufacturers they use (good luck finding out who the true manufacturers are of all the components).
If you want an 8k AVR now, any will probably do as they will be top of the line for the Denon, Marantz, Onkyo, Yamaha or whatever. It will come with all the latest bells and whistles.
 

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The difference between 95 watts and 105 watts is about 1/2 dB.

Other specs may matter though.
 
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... Any other features I should look at for relevance 6 years from now?
You can confidently forget about that criteria! AVR manufacturers engage in a strategy of "planned obsolescence" to ensure you cannot predict what you'll need in the future. They've already worked out next year's "must have" features to ensure this year's models will already be obsolete.

But to my question... how important is a difference of watts? 95 v 105?
The difference between 95W and 105W equates to a 0.4dBSPL increase in output. This is well below the accepted JND (just noticeable difference) of 1dBSPL. The difference is really only relevant if your listening habits and speaker/room situation mean that your output requirements fall within the 0.4dB envelope that routinely clips the 95W rated amps but does not clip the 105W rated amps. A pretty unlikely scenario. A more likely scenario is that if you blow through the limits of the 95W rated amps, you'll also routinely clip the 105W rated amps.

This will be for 100% movies in a 7.1.2 set up. I do tend to watch at fairly high sound levels.
The often linked myhometheatre.homestead calculator has a few basic faults built in. A better calculator can be downloaded here: Amplifier power / SPL calculator for home theater THX reference level - Acoustic Frontiers.

Speakers are all in the Klipsch Premiere Reference series (high sensitivity).
When using that calculator, be aware that Klipsch routinely exaggerates their sensitivity specs. In independent testing, their consumer speaker lines "miss" their claimed sensitivity specs by an average of 6dB/1W/m and up to 8dB/1W/1m.
 

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I am finally getting ready to upgrade my AV receiver to one that supports Dolby Atmos. I have been on the fence for quite some time.

I've kinda decided that I want both 4K and 8k passthrough or upscaling so this AVR lasts me a while. Any other features I should look at for relevance 6 years from now?

But to my question... how important is a difference of watts? 95 v 105? the price is a few hundred bucks and I'm wondering if it's worth it (I need to buy new Atmos speakers, after all).

This will be for 100% movies in a 7.1.2 set up. I do tend to watch at fairly high sound levels.

Speakers are all in the Klipsch Premiere Reference series (high sensitivity).

Thank you in advance.

p.
Not an answer to your question,but first thing that stood out to me is your plan to use 7.1.2 I would strongly suggest going 5.1.4 or getting a 11 channel processing capable receiver and use external amplification for 7.1.4. The four overhead make for a far more noticeable immersive sound experience than the two behind you. You will get much better panning/moving sound. As an example if you can find the Helicopter Demo in Atmos, when I had 5.1.2 it sounded like I was in a dome and the helicopter was bouncing up and down over me trying to penetrate the dome. When I went to 5.1.4 that same demo clip the sound remains above me. It sound like the local police helicopter when it surveys the neighborhood, just tighter like I might be the suspect and keeping an eye on me until groud crew shows up. That point four just defines the sound so much more. I have since added two rear surrounds but don't notice as much difference as I did when I went Atmos and then to four overheads. The rear ones are so subtle and I could easily live without.

Now to actually answer your question, no the difference between receivers 95-110 watts or whatever won't make a difference. As mentioned earlier that the larger power supply will help with quality of sound and dynamics. My first time ever going to external amps was the two channel to power my towers and let my receiver power the other 9 for 7.1.4. On paper the 140-watt 2-channel driven amp wasn't much more than my receivers 110-watt 2-channel driven rating. In movie viewing I didn't notice any difference. In stereo direct mode I had better bass response. I recently got a used 9 channel amp rated at 150-watt 2-channel driven. The power supply is rated 11.7 amps,so while I am not listening any louder, I am noticing a distinct clarity and dynamics in my surround and Atmos/DTSX effects. Now that I have experienced it, quality power is a priority for anything I do in the future.
 

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Thanks for the replies, everyone.

Joshua - Unfortunately, I cannot have 4 overhead speakers because of my room's limitations (it is a small room with an HVAC "drop down") running where I would install the two rear overhead speakers.


Not an answer to your question,but first thing that stood out to me is your plan to use 7.1.2 I would strongly suggest going 5.1.4 or getting a 11 channel processing capable receiver and use external amplification for 7.1.4. The four overhead make for a far more noticeable immersive sound experience than the two behind you. You will get much better panning/moving sound. As an example if you can find the Helicopter Demo in Atmos, when I had 5.1.2 it sounded like I was in a dome and the helicopter was bouncing up and down over me trying to penetrate the dome. When I went to 5.1.4 that same demo clip the sound remains above me. It sound like the local police helicopter when it surveys the neighborhood, just tighter like I might be the suspect and keeping an eye on me until groud crew shows up. That point four just defines the sound so much more. I have since added two rear surrounds but don't notice as much difference as I did when I went Atmos and then to four overheads. The rear ones are so subtle and I could easily live without.

Now to actually answer your question, no the difference between receivers 95-110 watts or whatever won't make a difference. As mentioned earlier that the larger power supply will help with quality of sound and dynamics. My first time ever going to external amps was the two channel to power my towers and let my receiver power the other 9 for 7.1.4. On paper the 140-watt 2-channel driven amp wasn't much more than my receivers 110-watt 2-channel driven rating. In movie viewing I didn't notice any difference. In stereo direct mode I had better bass response. I recently got a used 9 channel amp rated at 150-watt 2-channel driven. The power supply is rated 11.7 amps,so while I am not listening any louder, I am noticing a distinct clarity and dynamics in my surround and Atmos/DTSX effects. Now that I have experienced it, quality power is a priority for anything I do in the future.

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Thanks for the replies, everyone.

Joshua - Unfortunately, I cannot have 4 overhead speakers because of my room's limitations (it is a small room with an HVAC "drop down") running where I would install the two rear overhead speakers.





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They don't have to be in ceiling speakers. They can be bookshelfs on wall mounts mounted high by the ceiling angle/aimed towards listening position. That will actually sound better than a speaker pointing down at the floor. After that it aesthetic preferences.
 
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