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I can't wait till all TV is in HD, but how long you before it happen's?


When filming move's & all types of show's do they shoot with a diff camera than reg ones? Or do they have to buy whole camera's for HD?
 

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I think thats about the soonest you're gonna see everything in HD. It might even be 2015 in all honesty. Just think about how much talk there is about "bandwidth" on this board everyday. Now imagine all these dish and cable companies trying to push dozens of HD channels out right now. Thats a long way from becoming reality. However, the decreasing costs of HD cameras is a very good sign that many networks are gonna start going that way soon.
 

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Then we will all be asking how long before all tv is in 3D:


Project aims to create 3D television by 2020 Fri Aug 19, 7:45 AM ET




TOKYO (Reuters) - Imagine watching a football match on a TV that not only shows the players in three dimensions but also lets you experience the smells of the stadium and maybe even pat a goalscorer on the back.


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Japan plans to make this futuristic television a commercial reality by 2020 as part of a broad national project that will bring together researchers from the government, technology companies and academia.


The targeted "virtual reality" television would allow people to view high-definition images in 3D from any angle, in addition to being able to touch and smell the objects being projected upwards from a screen parallel to the floor.


"Can you imagine hovering over your TV to watch Japan versus Brazil in the finals of the World Cup as if you are really there?" asked Yoshiaki Takeuchi, director of research and development at Japan's Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications.


While companies, universities and research institutes around the world have made some progress on reproducing 3D images suitable for TV, developing the technologies to create the sensations of touch and smell could prove the most challenging, Takeuchi said in an interview with Reuters.


Researchers are looking into ultrasound, electric stimulation and wind pressure as potential technologies for touch.


Such a TV would have a wide range of potential uses.


It could be used in home-shopping programs, allowing viewers to "feel" a handbag before placing their order, or in the medical industry, enabling doctors to view or even perform simulated surgery on 3D images of someone's heart.


The future TV is part of a larger national project under which Japan aims to promote "universal communication," a concept whereby information is shared smoothly and intelligently regardless of location or language.


Takeuchi said an open forum covering a broad range of technologies related to universal communication, such as language translation and advanced Web search techniques, could be established by the end of this year.


Researchers from several top firms including Matsushita Electric Industrial Co. Ltd. and Sony Corp (NYSE:SNE - news). are members of a committee that published an interim report on the project last month.


The ministry plans to request a budget of more than 1 billion yen to help fund the project in the next fiscal year starting in April 2006.
 

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I know it is fashionable to complain about the lack of HD programming, but right now things are pretty good in network HD.


For the upcoming 2005-2006 network season, there is at least one HD program on the six networks in every time slot.


Looking at just the Big 4 (ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC) there are at least three HD choices in 16 of the 22 nours of network prime time.


There is only one hour (Sunday 7 PM ET/6PM CT) when there are no Big 4 HD programs.


Of the 208 half hours on the six network schedules, 152 of them are presented in HD.


In my eyes, that is pretty remarkable, given what was available just a couple of seasons ago, and considering that under 15 per cent of the nation's home are equipped to watch HD programming.
 

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How long before everything is high-definition? Our grandkids will be asking the same question.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z
How long before everything is high-definition? Our grandkids will be asking the same question.
Agreed. This is not something that will happen in our lifetimes. It will be nice to see everything switch to digital.
 

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Does anyone know when the reruns of "Petticoat Junction" will be in HD? I think there were some hot babes in that show.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Josh Z
How long before everything is high-definition? Our grandkids will be asking the same question.
Correct. But what people need to focus on now is actually getting real HD delivered from their provider not HDlite. The amount will increase steadily but I doubt everything will ever be HD in my liftetime.
 

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Either you guys are old farts or you're crazy, because there is no doubt in my mind that everything is gonna be in HD before my lifetime is over. I'm 29 years old and i'm hoping I have at least 50 years to go. How could you think that everything we watch won't be in HD in the next 50 years?!?



By then they'll have moved on to even better resolutions and HDTV will be a thing of the past.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot
Either you guys are old farts or you're crazy, because there is no doubt in my mind that everything is gonna be in HD before my lifetime is over. I'm 29 years old and i'm hoping I have at least 50 years to go. How could you think that everything we watch won't be in HD in the next 50 years?!?



By then they'll have moved on to even better resolutions and HDTV will be a thing of the past.
In a perfect world that would happen, but people will still provide an audience for shows created before HD. A lot of that stuff is available only on SD videotape. Even some of that programming that was shot on film was master on tape meaning it will never be seen in HD.


A better question would be "when will all NEW programming be HD?" The answer? Right about the time the last of the SD remote trucks can no longer be kept running with chewing gum, rubber bands and duct tape and stringer videographers upgrade their equipment. At that point, there won't be anything but HD out there since SD equipment manufacturing is dwindling down as time goes on. In many cases, it's all about waiting for stuff to break to replace it. However, if the wrong things break in the wrong order, they may get replaced by new SD stuff, which could set things back a decade or more from where they would have been (gotta get full use out of everything).


The greatest hurdle? News operations and sports like racing where a lot of tiny wireless cameras are used. The wireless issue will soon be conquered and there are already some very small broadcast quality HD cameras out there. As far as news, they seem to be working backwards, taking advantage of web cams for remote broadcasts for cost savings. However, broadband speeds are increasing, and HD over ISPs can't be far away.
 

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I would bet that as more widescreen tv's penatrate america we may not see all stations go to Hd, but I bet there will be a lot of the lesser cable stations that will go to 480 widescreen as it will be cheaper and easier to do. I bet for the near distant future only the bigger channels will use actual HD.
 

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i agree with FredFa. I think all the networks should be commended for catoring to us early adopters by making at least 50% of each of their schedules available in HD. It seems the only things that arent HD are reality shows on networks besides FOX. FOX gets the most credit, i'd say for putting these lame soon to be over fad shows in HD.
 

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When the HD trucks cost the same (or, less than :) ) SD trucks, then HD will stand a chance. Of course, the backhaul costs will have to come down drastically, too.


Right now, it costs as much as 10 times the money to rent an HD truck. And, it takes most of a sat transponder to backhaul it.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tigerriot
Either you guys are old farts or you're crazy, because there is no doubt in my mind that everything is gonna be in HD before my lifetime is over. I'm 29 years old and i'm hoping I have at least 50 years to go. How could you think that everything we watch won't be in HD in the next 50 years?!?



By then they'll have moved on to even better resolutions and HDTV will be a thing of the past.
If you think that your local Sunday morning preachers broadcasting from their garages are ever going to be HD you are fooling yourself. As NetworkTV stated, not till all of the SD equipment fails and the HD equipment is the same price. But even then the small outfits are running on subchannels usually. So I sand by the NEVER opinion.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Davv
I can't wait till all TV is in HD, but how long you before it happen's?


When filming move's & all types of show's do they shoot with a diff camera than reg ones? Or do they have to buy whole camera's for HD?
Davv,


Think back to gradeschool. To make a word plural, add an s - no apostrophe.
 

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".... everything in HD....."


Never.


1. There is no legal mandate- no law, no FCC reg- requiring HD. Only DTV is required. Only market forces will drive any move toward increased HD programming.


2. "I Love Lucy" & other shows from the 50s & 60s still run, and may run for another 50 years. 4:3 B&W, but people still want them- they just syndicate to smaller stations. No doubt the same will be true for stuff from the 90s, selling 50 years from now. Never can be made HD- just upconverted.


3. HD will always be more expensive to produce than SD, although the difference is decreasing.. Some shows simply will not support the added costs.


4. Multi-casting. This is a valid business model, and despite what we like and want, multi-casting is here to stay. Broadcasting 4 to 6 SD programs to smaller audiences, especially during certain times of the day, may bring in more revenue than a single HD program. Foreign films, foreign language programming, certain religious programs, hobby programs, etc etc etc, might draw enough of an audience to rate a multi-casting slot, but no more.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by navychop
".... everything in HD....."

2. "I Love Lucy" & other shows from the 50s & 60s still run, and may run for another 50 years. 4:3 B&W, but people still want them- they just syndicate to smaller stations. No doubt the same will be true for stuff from the 90s, selling 50 years from now. Never can be made HD- just upconverted.
I Love Lucy can be downconverted from film to HD easily.
 

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I don't know that HD will always be more expensive then SD. That is like saying that color is always more expensive then black and white. When most facilities are set up to use HD and most cameras available are HD and editing and such is set up to handle HD, SD will then become more expensive becuase if economies of scale.
 

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"everything in HD" is not the right question. It will certainly happen, but that's not the right question. What

you are looking for is the "inversion". What the inversion is is the point where HD technology for production

has enough volume that it will be cheaper to buy new production equipment, cameras recording equipment,

etc., in HDTV than SDTV. This won't instantly mean all HDTV, all the time. There will be a period after that

time when HDTV cameras and equipment will be used to produce SDTV shows (which is already happening).


Its a very tall order. You are talking about when all the current equipment is old enough to need

replacement, and the used equipment market for SDTV has dried up.


The good news is that once the inversion point is reached, the obsolescence of SDTV technology will

occur quite rapidly. Networks and stations don't want to have two different broadcast technologies,

so there will be considerable incentive to get rid of "obsolete" SDTV equipment.


I would say that 2015 is more realistic for such a tipping point. The analog phase-out isn't going to happen

until 2008-2009 at the earliest, and SDTV can live on quite a while as a digital format. Remember, all

HDTVs can present an SDTV picture.
 
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