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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Seeing as we have so many Blu-rays where the master was created from the OCN, you would think Blu-ray has an advantage over theatrical prints.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by emgesp /forum/post/18223026


you would think Blu-ray has an advantage over theatrical prints.

In many respects, you are correct. The BDs for most modern films will come directly from the DI (digital intermediate) which is generationally closer to the OCN than the print you see in the cinema.
 

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Also, most 35mm release prints fall somewhere in the neighbourhood of 720p-1080p, and you have gate weave on top of that. So unless you're seeing a film in 2K or 4K digital, the theatrical presentation typically has less detail than blu-ray, and it's being projected onto a much larger screen.


Of course, film has other advantages - greater dynamic range, colour depth, no compression etc. But strictly in terms of detail, blu-ray usually wins out.


This is from the cinematographer of Jennifer's Body:

http://www.cinematography.com/index.php?showtopic=43683

This isn't accurate or even provable, but my mental checklist is that 35mm negative is 4K at best (3K on average) whether or not you want to argue for even higher scanning resolutions, and that 35mm answer print resolution is 2K at best, and a 35mm release print from an IP/IN is less than that, let's say 1K.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That is why I'm in love with the Muvico close by.


4k digital projectors are the way to go. Though, I know so many love 35mm film projectors, but in my opinion the only film projection worth viewing is IMAX.
 

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When I saw the new Star Trek for the second time in theaters (first time was opening day in Paris, saw it before most of the rest of the world!), it was on film about a week after it opened here in NoVA. There was a noticeable line down the right side of the print towards the end (think of those handful of shots during the final action sequence when big blue earth is filling up most if not all of the frame). For new hollywood movies like this that are going through at least 2k DI anyway, it really would've been better to be watching it in digital projection because I wouldn't be at the mercy of whether I see a print before it gets damaged or after.


That's where blu-ray does have some kind of advantage. Yes, it's compressed, but it's digital. For new release movies, you couldn't possible have a more "stabilized" presentation without going to see it in digital projection.
 

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Just a note, a line on the projected film is 99% of the time caused by a sloppy projectionist.

I, as a projectionist, can say with confidence that normal wear and tear on a copy isn't obnoxious for many weeks if the film is well handled in the projection booth, and long scratch lines only happen when the projectionists don't clean the equipment or when the film is not threaded correctly thru the projector.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by worth /forum/post/18235492

Also, most 35mm release prints fall somewhere in the neighbourhood of 720p-1080p, and you have gate weave on top of that. So unless you're seeing a film in 2K or 4K digital, the theatrical presentation typically has less detail than blu-ray, and it's being projected onto a much larger screen.


Of course, film has other advantages - greater dynamic range, colour depth, no compression etc. But strictly in terms of detail, blu-ray usually wins out.


This is from the cinematographer of Jennifer's Body:

http://www.cinematography.com/index.php?showtopic=43683

This isn't accurate or even provable, but my mental checklist is that 35mm negative is 4K at best (3K on average) whether or not you want to argue for even higher scanning resolutions, and that 35mm answer print resolution is 2K at best, and a 35mm release print from an IP/IN is less than that, let's say 1K.
Not according to this:

http://www.etconsult.com/papers/Tech...Resolution.pdf
 

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Ken, doesnt page 8 say what worth bolded?

I read it to mean resolution projected onto the screen which viewers watch, and not off the film stock.

Even thought the issue is "clouded in politics".
 
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