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Discussion Starter #1
Here is a link to the speakers I have.
http://www.jbl.com/home/products/pro...at=BAL&ser=BAL

I have JBL Balboa 30s all around.


I'm running a 5.1 setup in my room. I got my speakers but I need to buy a receiver to complete my surround sound set up.


What type of receiver do I need to run 4 of these guys? I was thinking of the Onkyo 605 series or the Harman/Kardon avr-247. Any suggestions would be great.


What is the minimum requirement per channel that I need to look into to run these speakers?


The specs for the speakers are listed below:


Maximum Recommended Amplifier Power 150W

Power Handling (Continuous/Peak) 80W/320W

Nominal Impedance 8 Ohms

Sensitivity (2.83V/1m) 90dB

Frequency Response (-3dB) 47Hz - 20kHz

Crossover Frequency(ies) 600Hz, 3500Hz

High-Frequency Transducer 3/4" (19mm) Titanium-laminate dome, shielded

Midrange Transducer 100mm (4") Pure-cellulose-fiber cone, shielded

Low-Frequency Transducer 170mm (6") Pure-cellulose-fiber cone, shielded

Baffle Low diffraction, IsoPower

Port FreeFlow flared

Network Straight-Line Signal Path (SSP)

Terminals Gold-plated, 5-way binding posts, bi-wirable

Dimensions (H x W x D) 889mm x 229mm x 321mm

Weight per Speaker 14,5kg
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by killingfield1975 /forum/post/12850614


I was thinking of the Onkyo 605 series or the Harman/Kardon avr-247.

Add the Denon 1708? (IIRC) to that list and you will be fine with any of the three. Don't get too hung up on wattage ratings of AVR's as it can be difficult to find ratings that can be compared on an apples to apples basis. The specs of the speakers you posted show a decent sensitivity rating and should easily be driven by any of these three AVR's mentioned.
 

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Sweet at least i'm on the right track then. Now that I know any of those 3 receivers will work I would like to ask another questions.


If all receivers have the different wattage how will this effect how I hear my content from the speakers? I want the rich and full warming sound that I hear from music and movies. Will these receiver play a different role or will it sound pretty much the same?


oh and 1 mroe question... DTS, True HD, Digital Dobly etc. which is the best decoder in your opinion?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by killingfield1975 /forum/post/12850999


Sweet at least i'm on the right track then. Now that I know any of those 3 receivers will work I would like to ask another questions.


If all receivers have the different wattage how will this effect how I hear my content from the speakers? I want the rich and full warming sound that I hear from music and movies. Will these receiver play a different role or will it sound pretty much the same?


oh and 1 mroe question... DTS, True HD, Digital Dobly etc. which is the best decoder in your opinion?

Sound quality coming from a set of speakers will have very little to do with the wattage of the receiver.


The only thing I would recommend is that if you tend to drive your speakers hard, then get an receiver/amplifier that is rated at a higher wattage than the speakers can handle. Cranking an underpowered amp can cause clipping, which can damage speakers much worse than overpowering them.


Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD MA, and lossless LPCM are bit-identical to the studio master track, so those are the best codecs to use. Dolby Digital and DTS are lossy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by interpol /forum/post/12851287


Sound quality coming from a set of speakers will have very little to do with the wattage of the receiver.


The only thing I would recommend is that if you tend to drive your speakers hard, then get an receiver/amplifier that is rated at a higher wattage than the speakers can handle. Cranking an underpowered amp can cause clipping, which can damage speakers much worse than overpowering them.


Dolby TrueHD, DTS-HD MA, and lossless LPCM are bit-identical to the studio master track, so those are the best codecs to use. Dolby Digital and DTS are lossy.


well what exactly is that? My speakers are rated (Continuous/Peak) 80W/320W. so what exaclty does this mean? Does it mean that I need an amp that needs to push at least 80W per channel in order to drive these speakers?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by killingfield1975 /forum/post/12851987


well what exactly is that? My speakers are rated (Continuous/Peak) 80W/320W. so what exaclty does this mean? Does it mean that I need an amp that needs to push at least 80W per channel in order to drive these speakers?

It appears that the speakers will handle peaks well above 80 watts. I would look for a high current amp in the 100+ watt range. If current capability is not stated then look for dynamic headroom of at least 2 db with 3 db being better.


Wattage ratings of amps vary a lot. I can tell you that a high current amp of lower wattage rating will outperform a higher rated wattage amp without high current capability every time. Music and sound tracks are not constant, there are quiet and loud passages, mixes of frequencies etc. A good amp can follow these and produce the dynamic range you should be looking for. Do you have any friends that would be willing to lend you thier amp or receiver? Could you take your speakers to thier house and try some different equipment to see what works for you? Perhaps a local audio shop would let you bring in your speakers to audition some amps or receivers.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HT Nut /forum/post/12852104


It appears that the speakers will handle peaks well above 80 watts. I would look for a high current amp in the 100+ watt range. If current capability is not stated then look for dynamic headroom of at least 2 db with 3 db being better.


Wattage ratings of amps vary a lot. I can tell you that a high current amp of lower wattage rating will outperform a higher rated wattage amp without high current capability every time. Music and sound tracks are not constant, there are quiet and loud passages, mixes of frequencies etc. A good amp can follow these and produce the dynamic range you should be looking for. Do you have any friends that would be willing to lend you thier amp or receiver? Could you take your speakers to thier house and try some different equipment to see what works for you? Perhaps a local audio shop would let you bring in your speakers to audition some amps or receivers.

when you say amp do you mean amplifier or amperage? i have no clue what you are talking about here.


betwen the onkyo 605 and the harmon kardon avr-247 which has a higher amp?
 

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High current is a marketing term. Some amps can double power each time impendence drops by 1/2 up to some point. For example, a 100 watt amp into and 8ohm may be able to double the power to 200 watts into a 4ohm speaker.


Why should you care about this? One reason is that 8ohm speakers don't have a constant 8ohm impedence. So called "high current" amps deal better with the variable impedence of speakers.


So some people will tell you that some Harmon Kardon amp with 30 watts of output can beat some cheap JVC with 100 watts of output. I take some of these claims with a grain of salt, but I also take power ratings with a grain of salt as they don't seem to be useful for comparison purposes.


I am not saying high current amps don't have an advantage over amps which don't perform well as the impedence drops, but I think the advantage is overstated.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
ok another thing that i dont get is the specifications that i stated in my first post says that the maximum recommended amplifier should be 150watts


is that 150 watts per channel or 150 total watts from the receiver.
 

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I thought I'd revive this dormant thread. I also am a little fuzzy on wattage.


I just recently took advantage of a smokin' newegg deal where I got 5 speakers and a subwoofer and now I need to reconfigure my home theater setup. Basically I am going to replace my current receiver in my living room and need help getting one. I am all about bang for my buck. I had seen some positive talk on the Denon 1610 but it has 75 watts and I think that may be too low for the speakers I will be using in there. I currently have a nice Marantz 100 watts, but it is not a home theater receiver and geared toward music. I already have 4 Klipsch tower speakers and will be adding an Energy 5 Center Channel and a Polk Subwoofer to the mix so I am guessing 5.1 support is what I will need, although depending on the deals out there I can always go for a receiver that supports more.


Here are the speakers the receiver will need to support and their specifications:


My front 2

http://www.klipsch.com/na-en/product...pecifications/




My back 2

http://www.klipsch.com/na-en/product...pecifications/




(ONLY the Center Speaker from these)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-004-_-Product




and the subwoofer

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...-034-_-Product



My current receiver which will go in the bedroom and be used for the 4 satellites that come with the energy take 5 deal I found at newegg -

http://reviews.cnet.com/amplifiers-p...7.html#manDesc
 
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