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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
For any one that paid a Hometheater guy to install a outlet and run hdmi cable on top of the wall to the receiver.

How much did it cost you for the home theater installation guy to install it?

I would do it myself, but I'm not that good.

I can mount the projector on the ceiling and the screen by myself, but the power cable and hdmi cable will be dangling down from the projector.

I called one local installer in my area and he said $250. Is that a good price to do that?

I attached a picture of how I want to do it, clean no wires hanging down.
 

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Don't know never hired anyone from Middle Earth. Here in New England that would be a bargain for a licensed electrician to pay a visit.
 

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Seems good, figure $100 just to come to your house, and $100 an hour to be there. If you think he will rip through drywall, run wires, patch, sand, and paint for $250, you might want to do it yourself. If you are in an unfinished area $250 is about right.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
For the people who paid to get it done.I would still need input on how much you guys paid for it to be done.


Does any body have any other idea if hiring a Hometheater guy to install won't work out (Let's say he will charge too much to install).


Does any body have a guide on how to do this kind project?


If not here are some idea I thought of:

1) Set the projector on a coffee table in back of the room. (Instead of ceiling mounting)

2) Buy the wireless Hdmi version of the projector (epson 3600e, epson 5030e) or a Third party Wireless HDMI kit. ( That way I don't need to run the hdmi cable through the attic)

3) Run a white cable cover kit from amazon, to cover the hdmi cable and power cable.

4) be a man and crawl threw the attic to run the hdmi cable. (Never done that before, kinda nervous)
 

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For the people who paid to get it done.I would still need input on how much you guys paid for it to be done.


Does any body have any other idea if hiring a Hometheater guy to install won't work out (Let's say he will charge too much to install).


Does any body have a guide on how to do this kind project?


If not here are some idea I thought of:

1) Set the projector on a coffee table in back of the room. (Instead of ceiling mounting)

2) Buy the wireless Hdmi version of the projector (epson 3600e, epson 5030e) or a Third party Wireless HDMI kit. ( That way I don't need to run the hdmi cable through the attic)

3) Run a white cable cover kit from amazon, to cover the hdmi cable and power cable.

4) be a man and crawl threw the attic to run the hdmi cable. (Never done that before, kinda nervous)

Ok, so you have attic access. Pay the guy $250 and he will have it look great. Or do it yourself if confident. With attic access it should be relatively easy, but I understand paying someone to do it. If your going to do it(pay someone), run 2 HDMI's to a double box out at the projector, leave one covered, if you have problems with one down the road, switch to the other, never hurts to double up for the cost of an HDMI cable when going into walls(especially when you don't want to pay $100 to have a guy come run a second in 3 years)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ok, so you have attic access. Pay the guy $250 and he will have it look great. Or do it yourself if confident. With attic access it should be relatively easy, but I understand paying someone to do it. If your going to do it(pay someone), run 2 HDMI's to a double box out at the projector, leave one covered, if you have problems with one down the road, switch to the other, never hurts to double up for the cost of an HDMI cable when going into walls(especially when you don't want to pay $100 to have a guy come run a second in 3 years)
Thats a good idea.
 

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For the people who paid to get it done.I would still need input on how much you guys paid for it to be done.


Does any body have any other idea if hiring a Hometheater guy to install won't work out (Let's say he will charge too much to install).


Does any body have a guide on how to do this kind project?


If not here are some idea I thought of:

1) Set the projector on a coffee table in back of the room. (Instead of ceiling mounting)

2) Buy the wireless Hdmi version of the projector (epson 3600e, epson 5030e) or a Third party Wireless HDMI kit. ( That way I don't need to run the hdmi cable through the attic)

3) Run a white cable cover kit from amazon, to cover the hdmi cable and power cable.

4) be a man and crawl threw the attic to run the hdmi cable. (Never done that before, kinda nervous)
If you have an attic, it should b relatively easy. But just because you have an attic doesn't mean there is actually enough space to crawl back where you need to be. $250 is probably well worth it if you are unsure how to proceed. Just be careful that include drywall patching. It probably will NOT include painting as that requires color matching. If you know which way the ceiling joists run and they are perpendicular to the screen wall, you can be fairly confident a professional will leave no mess and make no unnecessary holes. If they run parallel to the screen wall, I'd be surprised if a pro would do it for that amount.

BTW, when did they take the other "T" out of Huntington Beach ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If you have an attic, it should b relatively easy. But just because you have an attic doesn't mean there is actually enough space to crawl back where you need to be. $250 is probably well worth it if you are unsure how to proceed. Just be careful that include drywall patching. It probably will NOT include painting as that requires color matching. If you know which way the ceiling joists run and they are perpendicular to the screen wall, you can be fairly confident a professional will leave no mess and make no unnecessary holes. If they run parallel to the screen wall, I'd be surprised if a pro would do it for that amount.

BTW, when did they take the other "T" out of Huntington Beach ?
Opps that was typo mistake. I see, so 250 would be too cheap. I should expect them to charge a few hundred more then.
 

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Opps that was typo mistake. I see, so 250 would be too cheap. I should expect them to charge a few hundred more then.
Depends on what they'll do. Just punch holes wherever needed and run cable and an outlet, leaving you to patch things up ? Sure, $250 in and out. Or easily accessible attic space ? Sure, $250 in and out. If they quoted you $250 without knowing anything about the job, I can see them adding charges when they get there if it is not a simple run. My brother is a drywall contractor here in SoCal and he wouldn't take a job sight unseen for $250 even if it was just patching a few holes in drywall (after someone else ran cable for electric and low voltage HDMI) and certainly not coming back later to match paint color and/or drywall texture. It is trip time, prep time, a lot of steps, and drying time between each.

None of which is all that difficult to do yourself if you have some patience and that attic is accessible all the way from where the projector will be to where there is already power on the wall where the source equipment will go. It will still take you a couple of hours, plus waiting time, plus multiple trips to Home Depot for the things you forgot and $50 for tools you don't have, but you can do it.
 

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While they are at it make the projector outlet connect to an IEC inlet near your AVR instead of just wiring it as a regular outlet. That eliminates most ground loop issues and allows you to plug into a quality surege protector or power center and is a superior install.

Midlite makes a nice IEC inlet that I use in my setup. The IEC computer cords that plug into it are cheap and readily available up to 14ga.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
While they are at it make the projector outlet connect to an IEC inlet near your AVR instead of just wiring it as a regular outlet. That eliminates most ground loop issues and allows you to plug into a quality surege protector or power center and is a superior install.
What is a IEC inlet? I will get that on list as soon as I understand what it is. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Depends on what they'll do. Just punch holes wherever needed and run cable and an outlet, leaving you to patch things up ? Sure, $250 in and out. Or easily accessible attic space ? Sure, $250 in and out. If they quoted you $250 without knowing anything about the job, I can see them adding charges when they get there if it is not a simple run. My brother is a drywall contractor here in SoCal and he wouldn't take a job sight unseen for $250 even if it was just patching a few holes in drywall (after someone else ran cable for electric and low voltage HDMI) and certainly not coming back later to match paint color and/or drywall texture. It is trip time, prep time, a lot of steps, and drying time between each.

None of which is all that difficult to do yourself if you have some patience and that attic is accessible all the way from where the projector will be to where there is already power on the wall where the source equipment will go. It will still take you a couple of hours, plus waiting time, plus multiple trips to Home Depot for the things you forgot and $50 for tools you don't have, but you can do it.

Dreamer I would like to do it myself, but is there a attic 101 I should learn first before going in there?
 

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So I would plug the AVR in the inlet right?
My recommendation is that the inlet is placed next to your AVR and surge protector. It allows you to get the projector power source on the same circuit to avoid ground loops and also allows a much better surge protector than you can get with a surge protected outlet or small surge protector directly on the ceiling outlet.

The other advantage here is that you don't have to connect the projector to a new circuit.


The IEC inlet (opposite of an inlet) will provide the power TO your projector outlet. I recommend using 12ga wire on the inlet to keep the ground wire resistance to a minimum. The price difference between 14ga and 12ga electrical wire really isn't that big.

Effectively this IEC inlet to outlet scheme makes an approved in-wall extension cord. Without this many people have ground loop issues over their HDMI cables or may have issues after adding new equipment like power amplifiers (myself included before I figured out this solution). The extent of the ground loop depends on how far the circuits are apart (how much ground wire between them) but there are no guarantees unless you pay close attention or do something like the IEC solution.

Connection wise, you plug a PC power cord into the IEC inlet and plug that cord into your surge protector (or even into an outlet without a surge protector).

Midlite IEC-46W Power Inlet


The IEC inlet then connects through inwall wiring to the projector oulet.

The projector then plugs into that outlet. Really this means you are basically plugging your projector into the surge protector just like a regular TV (just via the inlet/outlet in this case).

The inlets can be found at various places for $15-$25.

I use one on the projector in my main theater room to avoid ground loops.

I also use one in the living room where all of my audio equipment for that room is in a remote closet to keep the main TV area clean and the wife happy. I also use a current sensing surge protector in the living room with the TV connected through the inlet/outlet circuit so my AVR is turned on and off by the TV. That prevents my wife from always leaving the AVR on all the time like she sometimes did before! :)

There are regular extension cord inlets aswell but I think the IEC versions are cleaner and PC power cords are free from my work or with new computers/printers/etc. If you don't have a similar source or collection of IEC cords already then they are almost free at goodwill (as are various switching power supplies, phone chargers, etc). :)

-Rich
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
My recommendation is that the inlet is placed next to your AVR and surge protector. It allows you to get the projector power source on the same circuit to avoid ground loops and also allows a much better surge protector than you can get with a surge protected outlet or small surge protector directly on the ceiling outlet.

The other advantage here is that you don't have to connect the projector to a new circuit.


The IEC inlet (opposite of an inlet) will provide the power TO your projector outlet. I recommend using 12ga wire on the inlet to keep the ground wire resistance to a minimum. The price difference between 14ga and 12ga electrical wire really isn't that big.

Effectively this IEC inlet to outlet scheme makes an approved in-wall extension cord. Without this many people have ground loop issues over their HDMI cables or may have issues after adding new equipment like power amplifiers (myself included before I figured out this solution). The extent of the ground loop depends on how far the circuits are apart (how much ground wire between them) but there are no guarantees unless you pay close attention or do something like the IEC solution.

Connection wise, you plug a PC power cord into the IEC inlet and plug that cord into your surge protector (or even into an outlet without a surge protector).

Midlite IEC-46W Power Inlet


The IEC inlet then connects through inwall wiring to the projector oulet.

The projector then plugs into that outlet. Really this means you are basically plugging your projector into the surge protector just like a regular TV (just via the inlet/outlet in this case).

The inlets can be found at various places for $15-$25.

I use one on the projector in my main theater room to avoid ground loops.

I also use one in the living room where all of my audio equipment for that room is in a remote closet to keep the main TV area clean and the wife happy. I also use a current sensing surge protector in the living room with the TV connected through the inlet/outlet circuit so my AVR is turned on and off by the TV. That prevents my wife from always leaving the AVR on all the time like she sometimes did before! :)

There are regular extension cord inlets aswell but I think the IEC versions are cleaner and PC power cords are free from my work or with new computers/printers/etc. If you don't have a similar source or collection of IEC cords already then they are almost free at goodwill (as are various switching power supplies, phone chargers, etc). :)

-Rich


So if I use plug my AVR and projector in the same wall outlet, then I won't need a IEC inlet, right?

I hope I don't have to explain to the Hometheater installer about this subject, hopefully he just knows what I'm talking about and get it done.

Yes this is definetly on my list.

Thanks.
 

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So if I use plug my AVR and projector in the same wall outlet, then I won't need a IEC inlet, right?

I hope I don't have to explain to the Hometheater installer about this subject, hopefully he just knows what I'm talking about and get it done.

Yes this is definetly on my list.

Thanks.
It is usually not possible to plug a projector and AVR into the same outlet given that the projector is on the ceiling. :)

That is why you were putting in an additional outlet in the first place right? The IEC is used to connect the new outlet to outlet that the AVR is on.

-Rich
 

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If you have attic access above the projector, then $250 is a fair price, and you shouldn't expect any holes to be cut that aren't necessary.

I would recommend that you run two HDMI cables since they are already pulling a cable for you, that may be an extra 50 bucks, but if one cable fails, you won't have to deal with repulling right away.

No holes should be necessary in the drywall sense you are indicating there is access. This is a 'retrofit WITH access' - and is far cheaper than a retrofit without access.

This certainly is something that some people can tackle on their own if they are willing to go into their attic and are decent with tools. Tons of videos online on running wiring. If you take photos, you can get some pointers here as well.

If you want to run the projector off a decent surge suppressor which is near your AVR then you need to do the inlet/outlet as discussed above. A power inlet to in-wall power cable (ROMEX) to the outlet by the projector is basically just a long extension cord which is LEGAL to use.

They sell complete inlet/outlet packages, or you can just pick up a inlet at Amazon, then run Romex from the inlet to the outlet at the projector. You would plug your surge suppressor into the outlet on the wall. Plug your AVR into the surge suppressor, and then plug the projector into the ceiling, and the inlet to the surge suppressor. Just a long legal extension cord.

http://www.amazon.com/Midlite-IEC-4...UTF8&qid=1427401408&sr=8-9&keywords=iec+inlet

Don't overthink things here, and keep asking questions if you are confused.

Inlet next to an outlet...
 

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For any one that paid a Hometheater guy to install a outlet and run hdmi cable on top of the wall to the receiver.

How much did it cost you for the home theater installation guy to install it?

I would do it myself, but I'm not that good.

I can mount the projector on the ceiling and the screen by myself, but the power cable and hdmi cable will be dangling down from the projector.

I called one local installer in my area and he said $250. Is that a good price to do that?

I attached a picture of how I want to do it, clean no wires hanging down.
Several years ago I paid an electrician around $200 to run a special 20 amp double wall outlet that was to be for my home theater equipment (TV, pre-amp, TIVO, bluray players (2), etc.). I then ran a power cable myself around the room to the rear where it ran up the wall to my projector that was ceiling mounted near the back of the room. When I purchased a new projector I paid the dealer $175 to mount it, do basic calibration (also centering it on the screen). As part of the job they neatly ran an HDMI cable across the ceiling with the power line to run down the back wall. Both cables run along a side wall (where the floor and wall meet) to the front of the room and the equipment, I would love to have an electrician install an outlet in the ceiling bu that would cost at lest another $150. My wife has not complained how it looks but it is our family/thater room and NOT the living room.

John
 
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