AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
102 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I want to build a DVD storage cabinet that needs to be mounted above the baseboard heater. If I do this there will be heat buildup in the drawer. Does anybody have any idea how much temperature a DVD can withstand before it gets ruined?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
Common sense would suggest that either too much heat or the constant change in temperature are not ideal "living" conditions for your DVD's.


Possible solution: We have a toaster oven that is mounted to the bottom of one of our wall cabinets. It uses a special heat resistant mount (found at any appliance store) that protects the wood from the heat generated from the toaster oven. Just a thought.


Good luck,


Steven
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,656 Posts
"Kid"


Mr. Owl,


How many licks does it take to get to the center of a Tootsie Pop?


"Mr. Owl"

Let's find out....1....2....3....Crunch (or drip in this case ;) )


3!


Sorry. Couldn't resist.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
DVDs and CDs seem to generally be rated reliable for storage from -10 to +60 degrees Celsius (-40 to +150 F). When environment testing our data storage facility we were able to successfully read/write to stored DVD/CDs without error up to +92C (but they began to smell really bad by +80C) the plastic was too brittle below -30C and fractured easily (especially with cheaper band names). A side note; the cases do not survive nearly as well as the platters and would melt or fuse themselves to the disk making them unreadable much sooner. Warping didn't seem to be much of a factor even with the softened plastic. Sunlight (UV) exposure will damage the disks also (they eventually grow a powdery film on the exposed surface and begin to look cloudy). Basically, they should be able to withstand any normal room temperatures, however; the rising heat path of a baseboard heater carries allot of dust and static charge with it (also causes rapidly fluctuating humidity %ages) which also can damage your disks over time. If it's avoidable it would not be my location of choice but either way your home-owner's insurance policy may have a ryder available to cover loss due to "environmental conditioning" damage.
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top