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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have an Epson HC720 and a Samsung BD-UP5000 HD DVD/BR player that I have set to output 720p. I have the Epson set to through mode and the image set to larger. With it set that way I get 1:1 pixel mapping.


My question is how much should I manually overshoot the screen when using HD DVE's overscan test pattern? Just a smidge, none at all, out to a certain point in the test pattern???? I am using an Elite fixed frame screen that has a felt border. Any overscan is absorbed by the black felt.


The reason I ask is because if I set it manually using the zoom lens to none (the white border can be seen in the test pattern) I get tons of artifacts when watching regular TV. You can see the "noise" and it varies from channel to channel. It is very distracting. There is no issue when watching a HD DVD or BR except for the black bars above and below the image in a 1:85 movie are not perfectly centered. They are very close but the top is bit smaller. That wasn't the case when I centered the image using the test pattern. The image was perfectly centered.


Anyway, what is the best/most common way to set overscan with a projector?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by beekermartin /forum/post/14347107


I have an Epson HC720 and a Samsung BD-UP5000 HD DVD/BR player that I have set to output 720p. I have the Epson set to through mode and the image set to larger. With it set that way I get 1:1 pixel mapping.


My question is how much should I manually overshoot the screen when using HD DVE's overscan test pattern? Just a smidge, none at all, out to a certain point in the test pattern???? I am using an Elite fixed frame screen that has a felt border. Any overscan is absorbed by the black felt.


The reason I ask is because if I set it manually using the zoom lens to none (the white border can be seen in the test pattern) I get tons of artifacts when watching regular TV. You can see the "noise" and it varies from channel to channel. It is very distracting. There is no issue when watching a HD DVD or BR except for the black bars above and below the image in a 1:85 movie are not perfectly centered. They are very close but the top is bit smaller. That wasn't the case when I centered the image using the test pattern. The image was perfectly centered.


Anyway, what is the best/most common way to set overscan with a projector?

There's no rule of thumb when it comes to overscan. I put up the crosshatch pattern from my projector and used it to get the least amount of overscan as possible (less than half an inch on all sides). I too get some of the artifacts from regular TV channels and for some reason, my HD Sportscenter (Canadian version). All of my DVD's look fine as does HD.


Just an FYI - 2.35 movies differ on their placement of the image on the screen. I'm not sure why this is but when I looked into building a masking system for my screen, I realized that a lot of 2.35 movies have the image in different places with the black bars appearing higher or lower in the frame depending on the movie...?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Keith, thanks for the info on the black bars. I had noticed before that the black bars vary from movie to movie. I thought I was seeing things but now I know I wasn't.


I just played around with it for about an hour. If I set the aspect to "through", image size to "larger", and send the projector a 720p resolution image I get 1:1 pixels, zero over scan. I centered the image perfectly at that setting.


After that I set the aspect to normal and set the image size to normal. Then there is about 4% overscan. Using the HD DVE overscan test pattern the image is cutoff exactly one line away from the big "5" on all sides.


I think what is going to be best is to set it with zero over scan and use 1:1 setting for watching DVD/HD DVD/BR at 720p resolution. If I am watching cable and the "noise" is annoying on a certain channel I will change the image size so it overscans and removes the "noise".


Does that sound right?
 
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