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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I wish to get some advice / comments from the experts here, as well as others!



I live in a condo, and there are a lot of footfall noise, and noise from slamming of cabinet doors and sliding of chairs from upstairs.


The vibration is so bad that I can actually feel the ceiling is vibrating, as well as some vibrations on the the walls and floor.






This is what I intend to do:


(1) ceiling with "Kinetic Noise Control - Super Compact Ceiling Hanger (Model: KSCH)", with fiberglass isolation, a single layer of MLV inbetween two layers of gypsum boards




(2) all four walls with double layers of drywall + Green Glue


(3) thick carpet on floor



Now I wish to know how much reduction (in %) I should expect on


(a) footfall noise?

(b) noise from sliding of chairs?

(c) noise from slamming of doors?

(d) other higher frequencies noise?




Also any comments on my proposed upgrading work? Are there any other better solutions?



Many thanks!


kiwi992004
 

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If you want the maximum relief, you should consider damping the underside of the subfloor. See here for some details: http://www.soundproofingcompany.com/...noise_ceilings


- Remove the ceiling drywall


- Damp the underside of the subfloor as shown


- The system to decouple does not have to be as elaborate as you have described. Use a simple 1 piece clip and hat track.


- Drywall will add sufficient mass. MLV is not necessary.


- Substitute the MLV (which will not damp the drywall) for Green Glue (which will damp the drywall)


- Simple R19 fiberglass.


I would do the ceiling first and see how that goes. You will likely find there's no need to do the walls at all.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Hello Ted,


Thank you for your advice.


If I follow your advice and modify the ceiling only, how much reduction (in %) of impact noise from footfall, sliding of chairs and slamming of doors will I get? Say 50%, 70% etc...?


If I follow your advice and modify the ceiling plus 4 walls, how much reduction (in %) will I get?


Can I do the ceiling first, then the walls later on?


Advice from anyone is also welcome.



Many thanks!



kiwi992004
 

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Impact noise (such as from footfalls) is somewhat different than airborn noise. The carpet that you intend to put on your floor -- give it to your upstairs neighbors as a present to put on their floor!


Regards,

Terry
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Terry Montlick /forum/post/15561088


Impact noise (such as from footfalls) is somewhat different than airborn noise. The carpet that you intend to put on your floor -- give it to your upstairs neighbors as a present to put on their floor!


Regards,

Terry

From my own experience, this is the actually the best option (perhaps not realistic in your situation). In my house, the theater is below the living room above, which has hardwood floors. I used isolation clips and 2 layers of drywall with green glue between on the theater ceiling. This did reduce impact noise somewhat, however, there is a dramatic difference in footfall/impact noise between the portion of the living room that has an area rug/pad versus the plain hardwood.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tbain /forum/post/15563895


From my own experience, this is the actually the best option (perhaps not realistic in your situation). In my house, the theater is below the living room above, which has hardwood floors. I used isolation clips and 2 layers of drywall with green glue between on the theater ceiling. This did reduce impact noise somewhat, however, there is a dramatic difference in footfall/impact noise between the portion of the living room that has an area rug/pad versus the plain hardwood.

That's generally the case. The vibration from the footfall has entered the original framing. If this is a big anticipated problem, best to damp the original subfloor from the underside (theater side). Then add insulation, clips, drywall, etc.
 

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I have not had good luck with the additional layer of GWB and green glue. I now reccomend removing the existing clg and reinstalling a whisper clip type system. If the theater is located in the basement I heave even used black acoustical ceiling tiles to allow access to existing piping. If you can isolate the ceiling from the framing you will greatly reduce the amount of vibration. I also use staggered studs with accoustical sound attenuation in the cavity for all partition walls.
 

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We recently used a foam insulation in the cavities, sprayed the underside of the subfloor and sides of the joists. No batt insulation and cliped the clg to the joists. This proved to be a great solution as well. The foamed insulation limited the amount of movement in the framing and isolated the noise from the theater quite well. Albeit, it was more expensive then the batt insulation but left the trades alot of room in the joist bays for their "stuff". Another bonus was that the foam insulation was continuous. batt insulation is always broken up and stuffed in around lighting and piping.
 

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Adding drywall to existing joists is always going to be somewhat limiting because it's coupled. Sometimes that's all that can be accomodated, however.


If there's an existing ceiling, it's always best if it can be removed to introduce decoupling and proper absorption.


We don't recommend suspended tile ceilings due to lack of seals, lack of mass and lack of damping. Access to specific valves is best accomodated with a sealed hatch.


We also don't recommend foam of any type. While an excellent product for thermal purposes, it is far too dense and closed (even open cell foam) and expensive. Best lab tests come from open material such as cellulose, fiberglass, and mineral fiber. I haven't seen test data for polyester, but I assume it would work well also. Recycled cotton is also fine, but expensive with no performance gain.


Really, you can'y beat standard fiberglass. Contrary to intuitive loigic, there's no benefit to having a continuous layer. That's not how absorption operates.
 
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