AVS Forum banner
1 - 20 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just kind of curious because it's been ridiculously hot here lately and I don't have AC in my apartment. My PS3s fan has been understandably kicking it's fans up a notch recently. It's not in vaccum cleaner mode but it's the notch right below. I know it was designed to boost the fan speed before it became absolutely necessary to ensure it doesn't overheat and PS3s are generally reliable pieces of hardware but I also know they're not invincible and my 360 has me paranoid about hardware overheating this generation. So I'm curious: does anyone know the failure rate of the first generation PS3s? Should I be paranoid and is there anything I can do to help keep the system cool?


For the record ridiculously hot in Maine is 80-85 degrees and the system has sufficient ventilation space.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,817 Posts
I think they have the sturdiest shells. Gslide tested them all once by stacking his ******** on top of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
219 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by PvtChurch /forum/post/17011566


Just kind of curious because it's been ridiculously hot here lately and I don't have AC in my apartment. My PS3s fan has been understandably kicking it's fans up a notch recently. It's not in vaccum cleaner mode but it's the notch right below. I know it was designed to boost the fan speed before it became absolutely necessary to ensure it doesn't overheat and PS3s are generally reliable pieces of hardware but I also know they're not invincible and my 360 has me paranoid about hardware overheating this generation. So I'm curious: does anyone know the failure rate of the first generation PS3s? Should I be paranoid and is there anything I can do to help keep the system cool?


For the record ridiculously hot in Maine is 80-85 degrees and the system has sufficient ventilation space.

Keep it out of an kind of enclosure and with good amounts of air circulating around and dust-free and I think you will be fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts
It's a computer, so, eventually it wil fail. All electronics have a 100% failure rate. If you're really concerned about it, and it's out of warranty (I'm sure), open it up, clean it thoroughly, and re-apply arctic silver thermal paste to all the cooler mounts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,658 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by WJonathan /forum/post/17011697


It's a computer, so, eventually it wil fail. All electronics have a 100% failure rate. If you're really concerned about it, and it's out of warranty (I'm sure), open it up, clean it thoroughly, and re-apply arctic silver thermal paste to all the cooler mounts.

At the very least just get in there and clean it out. I cleaned a friends PS3 this weekend. I thought my dust bunnies were bad. Holy cow some of his were an inch in diameter. I thought about redoing the arctic silver past...but what would be the benefit if all is still operating well with just a thorough cleaning? I feared I might cause more harm than good (at least a dusting I can't say that for).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,341 Posts
Mine is still going strong.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,473 Posts
mine continues to do everything I ask it too, it never lies, and always comes thru in the clutch, so pretty reliable
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dogdoctor /forum/post/17011889


At the very least just get in there and clean it out. I cleaned a friends PS3 this weekend. I thought my dust bunnies were bad. Holy cow some of his were an inch in diameter. I thought about redoing the arctic silver past...but what would be the benefit if all is still operating well with just a thorough cleaning? I feared I might cause more harm than good (at least a dusting I can't say that for).

Well, if it is dusty, and his room is hot, it's safe to say that it's been running hotter than you'd like. Which means the original thermal paste (probably just the white stuff) has dried up and clotted. Removing all that (with rubbing alcohol) and re-applying a high quality thermal paste assures the best heat transfer between the chip and cooler, helping prevent YLOD failures. It's good practice with any home computer to do that every few years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
529 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by WJonathan /forum/post/17013087


Well, if it is dusty, and his room is hot, it's safe to say that it's been running hotter than you'd like. Which means the original thermal paste (probably just the white stuff) has dried up and clotted. Removing all that (with rubbing alcohol) and re-applying a high quality thermal paste assures the best heat transfer between the chip and cooler, helping prevent YLOD failures. It's good practice with any home computer to do that every few years.

I never did that with my Dell Dimension 2400 which is several years old and it's just fine. I got a YLOD on my barely 2 yo PS3-60 and sent it in for repair, which did include a re-solder and new paste for the GPU. If it fails again, I'll just get a newer model that runs much cooler and quieter.


The original PS3-60s just runs too damn hot. They packed too much stuff into too small of a box. It would've been better to put it in a big box with decent space and ventilation. It just wouldn't have looked as hi-tech.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
859 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Alright, I'll probably give it a cleaning sometime in the near future to be safe. Probably won't mess with the heatsinks anytime soon. I'm planning on doing an x-clamp fix if my 360 ever red rings so if that happens I might repaste the heatsinks in the PS3 while I'm at it and have Arctic Silver handy. Until then though I don't feel comfortable messing it since I'm not familiar with the layout of the system.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan P. /forum/post/17013241


The original PS3-60s just runs too damn hot. They packed too much stuff into too small of a box. It would've been better to put it in a big box with decent space and ventilation. It just wouldn't have looked as hi-tech.

Well my January '07 build 60G barely gets warm even after playing Fallout 3 for 10 hours straight. I've never had an issue with it. Maybe yours just doesn't have a good thermal interface.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,525 Posts
They're not too reliable long-term IMO.


I know 4 people that have/had one, all in their early 30s. All four failed post-warranty. It doesn't get the press the 360 did because it doesn't present a problem on Sony's financials (quite the opposite, in fact).


I'm not implying the PS3 is any less dependable than the 360, but they do give up the ghost post-warranty quite often.


Also, if you break the warranty seal...Sony will not fix it for the standard $150. Just be advised.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
Mine has been running pretty much 24/7 since the [email protected] application came out. No problems, it just keeps running. For verification that's me in 5th place on the AVS Forum team. AVS Forum Team Stats . Most of the points are from the PS3. I have also been folding on my home computer using the GPU over the last several months. I encourage anyone interested in joining the AVS Forum team to do so (Team ID 55280).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,757 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by PvtChurch /forum/post/17013994


Alright, I'll probably give it a cleaning sometime in the near future to be safe. Probably won't mess with the heatsinks anytime soon. I'm planning on doing an x-clamp fix if my 360 ever red rings so if that happens I might repaste the heatsinks in the PS3 while I'm at it and have Arctic Silver handy. Until then though I don't feel comfortable messing it since I'm not familiar with the layout of the system.

There's a guy who goes by "gilsky" who wrote up a really nice walkthrough for disassembling, cleaning, re-flowing and repasting the PS3 to solve YLOD errors. Pictures and stuff too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,860 Posts
Doing that will definitely make it worse! You want to remove the dust, not just blow it to some other location in the case. It's easy to disassemble and clean. I would recommend cleaning at least once a year. Even more if you have it in a dusty environment.
 
1 - 20 of 36 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top