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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First things first: What would you recommend I use to output my computer signal to my TV in 1080i? The AA transcoder is a little pricey right now, so I'm looking for other methods. I don't want to sacrifice image quality.


For non-transcoders: Any suggestions for VGA/DVI --> Component (RGB, or RGBHV) cables that will work for my Mitsubishi WS-65809. I have a Gf4 Ti 4200 with VGA, DVI, and composite out. The cable length would need to be about a max of 15 feet long.


I would like to watch upscaled DVDs on my RPTV in 1080i.(The TV only does 480i, 480p, and 1080i) I'd also like to play some games and other stuff.

What kinda quality should I expect with this? Could it get as nice as HBO-HD movies or near that quality?


Another question: Would you recommend I output 480p (540p if that's possible to go into my TV), or 1080i? I'll tell you right now I do not see the difference from going from 480i to 480p on my current cheap memorex DVD player. Maybe I would on a better player, or maybe my line doubler on my TV is really good. So I don't think I'd mind going to 1080i.


Thanks for the help!
 

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If your Mitsubishi has a real RGB input as opposed to component, I recommend that connection. You can use a VGA-to-5-BNC "breakout" cable, along with five BNC-to-RCA adapters. Set up your PC with 640x480 and 960x540 60 Hz outputs for full-screen and wide-screen displays, using Powerstrip. Search this forum for more details and read the FAQ section as well. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks,


Any idea how I check if my TV has realy RGB input as opposed to just a component input?


I know it does have the HV inputs if that helps.


Also, I could go to to full 1080i resolution, right? Since you didn't mention that I'm not sure if there's something wrong with it or you simply didn't mention it.
 

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Vagetto-


The GRBHV is the RGB input I was referring to.


960x540 is a progressive-scan resolution that is a substitute for 1080i and will be good for DVD watching. I do not think Nvidia video boards like your TI 4200 can produce a usable interlaced picture, so that is one reason 540p is used instead.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks.


If I got a video card that could output the 1080i resolution needed, would that be preferred over 540p?


If I was only doing this for DVD playback, is there any noticable quality difference from my 480p current setup and this 540p one? I figure 1080i would definently show a difference due to the much higher resolution.
 

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In theory 1080i may be preferable to 540p for DVD/TV viewing. However, in practice it is difficult (impossible?) to acheive using today's graphics cards. But it is not a major drawback - because 540p is a higher resolution than most video sources anyway. One reason for using 540p over 480p is to eliminate overscan (ie. the edges being cut off from the picture). You can use powerstrip to configure a resolution to (say) 500 lines but within 540p timings. Also, a higher resolution has more lines, and this usually means a better picture. Most people use powerstrip to try different resolutions (perhaps for different video sources). But most seem to settle on 540p (for RPTV's).


And then there is horizontal resolution to consider. 960x540 is standard, and it is a good resolution to start with. But your Mits will probably be flexible as to the horizontal resolution - and so (later) you may want to try higher horizontal resolutions for better picture quality (eg. 1440x540p).


A word of warning - some games may not run well on an HDTV, because they want to use standard resolutions (like 800x600 or something else). And many don't support custom resolutions, and are not designed for widescreen displays. On the other hand, some games work well.


As a general rule, in terms of picture quality, HDTV sources will be the best, then an HTPC should be next, then progressive DVD players, then interlaced DVD playback, and lastly regular TV broadcasts. But results will vary. The difference between an HTPC and progressive DVD playback may not be that great (it depends on many factors). But I'm surprised you don't see much difference between interlaced and progressive DVD. For me using a Mits 55809, the difference between HTPC (progressive) and DVD (interlaced) was noticeable.


Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yah, I'm thinking my TV has a good line doubler so I didn't notice too much compared to the cheapo progressive scan DVD player.


I did read the interlaced vs. progressive scan article that warned me if I read it I wouldn't enjoy DVDs as much with progressive because I'd notice the problems. but I still don't.
 

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