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How does one optain 4.1 sound from a 5.1 receiver? I've heard many members on this forum mention such a thing but I cannot figure out how it is done. Is it an option on certain receivers or does it require front speakers that can be wired from two different sources (one for the right or left and one for the center)?


I ask because I've yet to buy a 5.1 receiver and would like to upgrade from a 2.0 set peice buy peice. I wouldn't want to be forced to buy the rear surround and center channel speakers at the same time if I could avoid it.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Patrickhat
How does one optain 4.1 sound from a 5.1 receiver? I've heard many members on this forum mention such a thing but I cannot figure out how it is done. Is it an option on certain receivers or does it require front speakers that can be wired from two different sources (one for the right or left and one for the center)?


I ask because I've yet to buy a 5.1 receiver and would like to upgrade from a 2.0 set peice buy peice. I wouldn't want to be forced to buy the rear surround and center channel speakers at the same time if I could avoid it.
If you want to use four speakers as a first start, go into the setup menu of your receiver and select NONE for Center Channel. This action will send center information equally to your left/right front speakers creating a phantom center front.


Charles Wood

Fosgate Audionics

Rockford Corp
 

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Hmm, I tried this with my Sony receiver, and I didn't get much sound at all from the fronts. It seemed like the receiver was just dropping the center channel altogether. Can't remember if this was DD or ProLogic, though (maybe it works in one mode, but not the other). It definitely recognized the setting, as the little icon for the center was out; and I still had the center in place, so I would have heard it if it was still sending signal there.
 

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Originally posted by dcheesi
Hmm, I tried this with my Sony receiver, and I didn't get much sound at all from the fronts. It seemed like the receiver was just dropping the center channel altogether. Can't remember if this was DD or ProLogic, though (maybe it works in one mode, but not the other). It definitely recognized the setting, as the little icon for the center was out; and I still had the center in place, so I would have heard it if it was still sending signal there.
Then either the receiver is not designed correctly or perhaps your front left and right speakers are wired out of phase.
 

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A little late update here, just for the search value:

It turns out that my receiver will do 4.1 correctly, but only when I let it pick the sound format itself. Eg. if I manually set/force it to "normal surround" (prologic), it loses the center channel; but if I leave it on AutoFormatDecode, and it detects Prologic, it sends the center to L/R like it should. Still a bit bizarre, but better than nothing. Only problem is it's not good at detecting Prologic from analog sources...
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by dcheesi
A little late update here, just for the search value:

It turns out that my receiver will do 4.1 correctly, but only when I let it pick the sound format itself. Eg. if I manually set/force it to "normal surround" (prologic), it loses the center channel; but if I leave it on AutoFormatDecode, and it detects Prologic, it sends the center to L/R like it should. Still a bit bizarre, but better than nothing. Only problem is it's not good at detecting Prologic from analog sources...
It has no way of detecting whether or not an analog signal is Dolby Surround encoded. I'm interested in what you mean by "normal surround." Dolby Pro Logic, in the days before Dolby Digital and today's standard bass-management setup, had three modes: Normal (sent center-channel bass to the front left and right speakers), Wide (sent full-range signal to the center speaker), and Phantom (split entire center-channel signal out to the front left and right channels). If you actually have those modes available on your receiver, select "Phantom" for Pro Logic.
 

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I'm interested in what you mean by "normal surround.". Dolby Pro Logic... had three modes: Normal..., Wide,... Phantom.
That is not what normal surround in on modern Sony receivers. Here, "normal surround" refers to surround sound without any additional DSP effects, like "Cinema Studio EX" processing. It will always convert any 2-channel source into surround, using the selected mode (DPL, DPL-II, dts NEO:6), and will always play a multi-channel source unaltered (except for bass management and EQ).
 
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