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How would one add stuffing to a speaker enclosure? I don't want to add a lot of stuffing, just enough to dampen the internal reflections. Do you glue the stuffing to the wood or something?

Thanks
 

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What type enclosure is it?
From all I've read, Ported you line the walls- I glued my Mattress topper onto the walls- some folks glue and/or staple.
Sealed you stuff it with Polyfill or similar(amount depends on enclosure size).
Others will chime in with better info I'm sure.
 

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just open it up and fill it full of pink fluffy fiberglass or equivalent. pack in a little bit more than you think, but don't jam it in there so hard that it is completely compressed. :) obviously, keep away from ports, but you don't have ports so not a problem.
 

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Read this
http://www.data-bass.com/data?page=content&id=79


For sealed - stuffing doesn't do a whole lot until higher frequencies. If I understand correctly, ideally you'd most like to have smooth native frequency response to at least 1 octave higher than where your crossover point is. So if you use an 80hz crossover - it would be best to have a smooth native frequency response up to 160hz. (doubling of frequency = 1 octave). That is where stuffing can start to play in. This is of course, generic advice --- not all situations fit into this mold. Lots of variables.

I used an 70, 80 or 90hz crossover -- and I run my subs at least 6dB-10dB hotter than my mains --- so to me having a smoother frequency response at the one octave above crossover point seemed to be a logical goal.


Here are pics of what I did. I used about one pound of poly fill per cubic foot of airspace. So about 3 lbs per box in my case.
I used the generic polyfill which comes in 5 and 10lb boxes at Wal-Mart. It is friction held mostly, but then I used some real cheap nylon netting from JoAnne's to make sure it stayed in place and didn't get sucked into the pole vent, or drift up against the driver's cone and dampen cone movement.













 

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For speakers you would want stuffing as the reflection can matter more with those than with very low bass in a subwoofer, Remember bass frequencies are huge sized waves, Where something above 200hz is getting more manageable. Thus stuffing is less important in a sub, as far as noticeable results is concerned.

I use recycled denim, With 3M spray adhesive. Works great. Hot glue would work too.

Home Depot sells "ultra touch" recycled cotton/denim that works great. It's also a lot easier and safer than fiberglass (no itching or inhaling). It's free shipping on the webpage. A case is like $36. Not every Home Depot store stock it. Just order online.
 

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Somehow I read the original post, and was thinking subs. My bad.

Stuffing my Mackie c200 speakers with polyfill helped smooth frequency response at 300Hz due to my cabinets dimensions.

Post 31 documents my results with the polyfill stuffing.

http://www.avsforum.com/forum/155-d...32-mackie-c200-under-hood-2.html#post28545098




The test results seem to indicate the polyfill helped smooth the frequency response below 1Khz, at the expense of some spl around port tune.
The red line is the 10 capture average of the native frequency response of the C200 speaker.
The blue line is the 10 capture average of the poly stuffed frequency response of the C200 speaker.



Here are the distortion measurements stock


Here are the distortion measurements poly stuffed



Here is the bass decay stock


Here is the bass decay poly stuffed



measurement pictures



 

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that's a really nice before/after @Archaea. many resonances take on a characteristic sideways S shape and with stuffing you clearly knocked out two. the one at ~300hz is easy to 'eyeball'. the other at ~800hz, not so much.
 

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For speakers you would want stuffing as the reflection can matter more with those than with very low bass in a subwoofer, Remember bass frequencies are huge sized waves, Where something above 200hz is getting more manageable. Thus stuffing is less important in a sub, as far as noticeable results is concerned.

I use recycled denim, With 3M spray adhesive. Works great. Hot glue would work too.

Home Depot sells "ultra touch" recycled cotton/denim that works great. It's also a lot easier and safer than fiberglass (no itching or inhaling). It's free shipping on the webpage. A case is like $36. Not every Home Depot store stock it. Just order online.
Here's a link to that stuff:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/UltraTou...lti-Purpose-Roll-6-Pack-60306-16482/202710055
 

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^ thanks for the good info and testing, this is the stuff for Fusion Sentinels . . .
A "six pack" may be more that enough but then leftovers may be repurosed for panels
 

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^ if you would , please,
I have 2 on order from last week, haven't shipped yet but just getting ready, you know how it is,


and thank you
 

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If you use material like polyfil or fiberglass, particles can get into the voice coil area of the speaker. I've seen it happen. Plus, fiberglass is just nasty stuff, lol

Use one inch or thicker (the thicker the better) open cell foam on three opposing walls to reduce standing waves. Easier to work with and safer. Glue with 3m 74. Use the edge of a table as a guide and cut with electric knife. Mattress topper will work in a pinch.
 
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