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Hi,


I now have a dedicated 2.1 music system. Except for the Subwoofer which is share with my HT system. They consist of the following items.


Nad CD player


Parasound 2100 preamp - 2 channel with sub out and bass management. Crossover is set at 80Hz.


Parasound 2125 power amp


Leema Xero bookshelf speakers


SVS SB-12NDS subwoofer.



How do calibrate the subwoofer volume to match the speakers?


Here what I tried and not sure if this would provided a good starting point. I down mixed 5.1 calibration disk to 2 channel analog out on my DVD player and then sent it to the preamp. Then I played the test tone for right, left and sub and try to match the level that way using a radio shack sound level meter? Will this work? I just want a good starting point and adjust to slightly to my liking.




Thanks
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HienD /forum/post/19629697



How do calibrate the subwoofer volume to match the speakers?


Here what I tried and not sure if this would provided a good starting point. I down mixed 5.1 calibration disk to 2 channel analog out on my DVD player and then sent it to the preamp. Then I played the test tone for right, left and sub and try to match the level that way using a radio shack sound level meter? Will this work? I just want a good starting point and adjust to slightly to my liking.




Thanks

No need to make it too complex. Turn the knob until it sounds good to you. Seriously. It's that easy.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HienD /forum/post/19629697


Hi,


I now have a dedicated 2.1 music system. Except for the Subwoofer which is share with my HT system. They consist of the following items.


Nad CD player


Parasound 2100 preamp - 2 channel with sub out and bass management. Crossover is set at 80Hz.


Parasound 2125 power amp


Leema Xero bookshelf speakers


SVS SB-12NDS subwoofer.



How do calibrate the subwoofer volume to match the speakers?


Here what I tried and not sure if this would provided a good starting point. I down mixed 5.1 calibration disk to 2 channel analog out on my DVD player and then sent it to the preamp. Then I played the test tone for right, left and sub and try to match the level that way using a radio shack sound level meter? Will this work? I just want a good starting point and adjust to slightly to my liking.




Thanks

I don't see any reason why that wouldn't work. I'm also wondering why you even need to tell your DVD player to downmix the 5.1 from the calibration disk. Can't you just use the test signals from L, R, and subwoofer when measuring dB levels with your SPL meter from your listening position and ignore the signals for the other channels?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 /forum/post/19630436


No need to make it too complex. Turn the knob until it sounds good to you. Seriously. It's that easy.

I love this advice.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by HienD /forum/post/19629697




How do calibrate the subwoofer volume to match the speakers?


Here what I tried and not sure if this would provided a good starting point. I down mixed 5.1 calibration disk to 2 channel analog out on my DVD player and then sent it to the preamp. Then I played the test tone for right, left and sub and try to match the level that way using a radio shack sound level meter? Will this work? I just want a good starting point and adjust to slightly to my liking.

You will have to high pass filter the bookshelf speaker at 80Hz, the order

of the filter is important to avoid amplitude problems near the cross over point.

The order (rate of attenuation/Hz) should match the rolloff of the sub.

SVS might be able to give that info.


If you have a PC, I suggest downloading the test tones. for 120Hz, 80Hz and

60Hz. Measure the amplitude at 80Hz for both the mains and the sub

and try to get them as close as possible. Also check the output

on the 120Hz tone and the 60Hz tone with main and sub connected.

Adjust the output of the sub to get the amplitudes of these frequencies

within 6dB of each other.


http://www.audiocheck.net/testtones_...rsts20-200.php


A better method is to use the Room Eq Wizard. It is free software

and you should consider this if you have success with the simple method described above.
http://www.hometheatershack.com/roomeq/
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by holt7153 /forum/post/19643731


I love this advice.

Me too. But if you want some easy tests to help, check tracks 10-11 of this test CD .
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 /forum/post/19630436


No need to make it too complex. Turn the knob until it sounds good to you. Seriously. It's that easy.

That is good advice if there is only one knob to turn. But usually there is more than one knob. What to do then?
 

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Well if you can find and download a fs sweep if you can't I might have one or find one for you, basically takea radioshack meter run it in "c" weighting and run the sweep at your prefered volume. Then from multiple spots in the room make sure you have flat spl within 1-2db across the sweep.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by khellandros66 /forum/post/19650703


Well if you can find and download a fs sweep if you can't I might have one or find one for you, basically takea radioshack meter run it in "c" weighting and run the sweep at your prefered volume. Then from multiple spots in the room make sure you have flat spl within 1-2db across the sweep.

Good advice, but running low frequency test tones at "normal" listening volumes might be more than you will want to subject your speakers to.


Best to run 1000 hz at 75 db reading on the SPL meter to establish a base level, then run test tones. Plot each frequency and it's corresponding SPL on graph paper, or at least write each reading down.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by whoaru99 /forum/post/19630436


No need to make it too complex. Turn the knob until it sounds good to you. Seriously. It's that easy.

I found this advice to work great. Believe it or not bought my RX-V1400 5 or 6 years ago and never got a sub, well got one yesterday. But it seems I put the YPAO mic in a very safe place and cannot find it. Tried to match levels using the receiver setup test tones, which did not work out great. So crossover is at 60 and just turned down the dial on the sub until the base from the sub seemed to blend well with the mains,for music. If I want to watch a movie I will turn it higher.

Old Mike
 
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