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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hello

i have HK 310 receiver 5.1.

i have 7 speaker . what the best way to connect them to the receiver. i don't have a sub.

thanks safaa
 

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safaa:

I can think of two interpretations of your question. The first is that you are trying to get 7.1 out of a 5.1 receiver. I don't know your receiver but I cannot recommend connecting two speakers to a single speaker output on your receiver. I don't think this would be good for the receiver nor would it generate effective sound. So, if this is your question, my best guess is that you can't. You will need a 6.1 (which uses a single channel for the rear surround speakers but has two rear surround speaker outputs) or a 7.1 receiver which will have a sufficient number of outputs.


Another interpretation is that you want to have two sets of front channel speakers with one set in another room. If your receiver does not have separate A and B speaker connections, then I am afraid the answer is the same - you shouldn't do it.


For an improvement in your sound, a good subwoofer (e.g., a HSU) would probably provide you with a more significant improvement than an extra pair of surround speakers...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks for reply

the HK receiver has 5 channel 75 watt each, 8 Ohm.

they L.\\R.\\Center,\\SR L\\SR R.

if i connect 2 speakers parallel 8 Ohm each to a single channel.

whats down side of doing that,,

thanks

safaa
 

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Two 8 ohm speakers wired in parallel is a 4 ohm load to the amp. But the speakers will not have a continous 8 ohm impedence. The impedence varies over the frequency spectrum. So wiring the speakers in parallel may present an unstable load for your amp to drive.


Results will depend on the actual impedence curve of the speakers used and the capabilities of the amp to remain stable at low impedence loads.
 

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Like Mnilan said, connecting 7 speakers to a 5 channel receiver will most definitely seriously damage your receiver. You can try, but you will most probably end up buying a new receiver.
 

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does the receiver have pre-outs? If so, send which ever two extra channels you want to duplicate to another amp/receiver and hook up the extra speakers to that amp. If not, don't do it, bad idea.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by russwong
How is this different then bi-wiring?
Well, for one thing, for an eight-ohm speaker, the upper and lower sections do present approximately eight ohms each, but only in their respective frequency ranges.


Outside these ranges, the impedance rises at the crossover slope rate, which means that the resulting current drops inversely, which is exactly how crossovers divide the current between the drivers even when 'mono-wired'.


Bi-wiring reduces the total current through the wire by dividing the load, and theoretically reduces the effect of current in one section from causing variations in the voltage (or 'modulation') at the terminals of the other section.


Either way, the load at the amplifier terminals ends up being the same. However, paralleling two speaker systems will indeed reduce the total impedance. The formula is (Impedance A x Impedance B) divided by (Impedance A + Impedance B).


For example, two eight-ohm speakers: (8 x 8)/(8 + 8) = 4 ohms.

Another example: an eight and a four: (8 x 4)/(8 + 4) = 2.667 ohms.
 

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Maybe there is a way without damaging your reciever. What if you connect the connect the speakers in series rather than parallel.


So instead of 1 speaker per surround channel you can have 2 connected in series, giving a total of 7 speakers.


MJConnel could elaborate on this idea.
 

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That's an easy one. Amp + to spkr 1 +, spkr 1 - to spkr 2 +, spkr 2 - to amp -.


It's important that the speakers be identical.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
hello

but connect 2 identical speakers in series that will make it 16 Ohm. going to 8 Ohm channel on receiver.

what is down side of doing that?
 

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C4, because, with parallel operation, each speaker flows the current that it needs independently of the other. The voltage across either speaker will not be dependent on the other (that is as long as the amp's power supply doesn't run out of current trying to feed the two loads).


Series-wired speakers have a single current path, and the current of one speaker flows through the other, and the normal variations in impedance that occur accross the frequency spectrum with one speaker will affect the other. The voltage across either speaker will vary in unpredictable ways, and that will affect the sound.


By matching speakers, the impedance variations will rise and fall together, so the voltage across either speaker will remain the same as across the other (within manufacturing tolerances, anyway). The sound quality from either speaker will not vary with frequency because of voltage drop across the other.


Safaa, yes, the impedance will double, halving the current at a given volume setting. For many amps, that is better than halving the impedance, which doubles the current demand, which some amps can't handle without overheating and/or premature clipping.


As the power supply current demand increases, the voltage drops, which means clipping occurs at a lower output voltage. The capacity of the power supply determines the levels and rate at which this occurs. The greater the ability of the power supply to ignore current demands, the lower the impedance the power supply is said to have. (Yes, sources have impedances, too.)
 

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Oh ok, I never thought bout it like that. Though, would using different speakers have a potential of causing damage to the reciever or speakers?
 

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No.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by safaa
thanks for reply

the HK receiver has 5 channel 75 watt each, 8 Ohm.

they L.\\R.\\Center,\\SR L\\SR R.

if i connect 2 speakers parallel 8 Ohm each to a single channel.

whats down side of doing that,,

thanks

safaa
Heh, heh, if you hook up 7.1 to your 5.1 HK, you'll have a perfect excuse to go buy a 7.1 receiver :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
i was thinking . to buy another amp but it will be to much that i have more speakers to buy. to hook it to 3 receivers 4+5+7=16 speakers.

i have 9 right now.

i could imagine if i turn on 3 receivers loud enough to move the house.:D .

or break the windows.
 

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I have the same question but slightly different setup.


I would like to try and add the two speakers of my Sony MHC-C90 mini hi-fi, that was bought 10 years ago, to my Onkyo HT-S650 htib. I will be connecting them as Speaker-B.


Specs:

Rated Impedance: 6 ohm

Max Input power: 200w


Are they safe to add these speakers with my R-500 receiver? Will there any damage occur to my receiver or the speakers? I would be using them both (Speaker A + Speaker B). I think the receiver shuts of the surrounds when Speaker B is selected.
 

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Yo! For anyone who wants to add a rear channel to their setup, and not just rear speakers, do what I did:


I 'happend' to have an outboard DD decoder collecting dust, so I inserted it in the surround line-level pathway, and set it to 3-channel mode (no surround speakers).


Then I split the center output and fed it to the two amp channels that power the rear speakers. This decodes rear surround the same way 6.1/7.1 receivers do.
 
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