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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was going to post this in my build thread but I dont think as many people would read it.


I want to add a second layer of wood to my entry door to my theater with green glue but since it is a 2 panel door I need to fill the recessed areas before doing so. I thought I read somewhere that someone used bondo for auto repairs but none of the ones that I read talk about sticking to wood so I am nervous about using it. If I sandwich the bondo with another layer of wood it wont fall out but I dont want it to break loose and rattle.


Any advice to make a nice door?
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I should have mentioned that I wanted the 2 panel door so that it would fit in with the rest of my house. That and Menards didnt have solid wood doors.
 

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We used Bondo in my car stereo installation days, It stuck great to MDF!


But the thread you are referring to the builder used self leveling compound used for concrete floors. It should work great.


You could also use fiberglass resin, but if you have never used it before it can be dangerous! You have to mix the resin and a hardener and if the mix is not right it can catch fire (too much hardener), or not cure (not enough hardener).
 

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Please pardon my ignorance, but is the cost benefit of doing this DIY that much better than buying one like what your looking for?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Mike, the self leveling compound makes me scared. The resin had two issues I could think of. One is that it is expensive per gallon and two is that I was afraid that it would leak through to the other side that I still want to keep decorative to fit in.


ratm, the doors I have look at that are specific to sound isolation are over $1000 and are very basic in design to where I should get out of this at about $350. It's worth it to me cost wise and I will get a nice looking door that fits in with my house.


rxtrom, the sand gave me an idea to mix sand with fiberglass resin. I'm not scared about the resin application as I am making a mess to the other side though.


I know bondo will stick but I am afraid of making it level without having to do a ton of sanding. I was hoping that maybe Ted would chime in on this one. If I cant get some more real world experience with things I may just go the self leveling compound route although that scares me also. Does anyone have the thread to where that was done?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by adammb /forum/post/18316071


ratm, the doors I have look at that are specific to sound isolation are over $1000 and are very basic in design to where I should get out of this at about $350. It's worth it to me cost wise and I will get a nice looking door that fits in with my house.

Is that $1k for a standard solid wood door, or something specifically marketed for sound isolation?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by adammb /forum/post/18316071


Mike, the self leveling compound makes me scared. The resin had two issues I could think of. One is that it is expensive per gallon and two is that I was afraid that it would leak through to the other side that I still want to keep decorative to fit in.


ratm, the doors I have look at that are specific to sound isolation are over $1000 and are very basic in design to where I should get out of this at about $350. It's worth it to me cost wise and I will get a nice looking door that fits in with my house.


rxtrom, the sand gave me an idea to mix sand with fiberglass resin. I'm not scared about the resin application as I am making a mess to the other side though.


I know bondo will stick but I am afraid of making it level without having to do a ton of sanding. I was hoping that maybe Ted would chime in on this one. If I cant get some more real world experience with things I may just go the self leveling compound route although that scares me also. Does anyone have the thread to where that was done?


Bondo would be easy to get the right height. Just use the sides of the door to pull a straight edge across.


You can also mix fiberglass resin with bondo. We called it a milkshake!
You won't need any bondo hardener in this case. Just make sure you know how much resin hardener you need before you mix it as once you put in the bondo your volume is much greater but you don't need the extra hardener! You can control the viscosity of the mix this way as well. Too thin? Mix in more bondo. Too thick? Mix in more resin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Your scaring me Mike
LOL Have you done this before?


Stereodude, I was referring to a door made for this application
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by adammb /forum/post/18316660

Your scaring me Mike
LOL Have you done this before?


Stereodude, I was referring to a door made for this application

I haven't done the door, but I used to build custom car stereos. We used bondo, fiberglass resin with fiberglass matte and fleece, mdf, foam, kitty hair , etc. We used milkshakes to apply large doses of bondo to help smooth out fiberglass panels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
An interesting idea. I think I will just go the bondo route and pull it smooth with a straight edge.
 

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The ideas in this thread made me think of another possibility.


Assuming I wasn't after maximum sound isolation...


Could I take the average hollow core door, drill a coupld of 0.5" holes at the top and fill it with Great Stuff expanding foam? (the minimal expansion kind for use around doors/windows)


The thought here is that I might get a little more mass in the door and reduce resonance slightly.


Would I have any issues with the door deforming? I'm thinking of doing this for a couple of my 6-panel interior molded hollow-core doors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by KingLeerUK /forum/post/18316866


The ideas in this thread made me think of another possibility.


Assuming I wasn't after maximum sound isolation...


Could I take the average hollow core door, drill a coupld of 0.5" holes at the top and fill it with Great Stuff expanding foam? (the minimal expansion kind for use around doors/windows)


The thought here is that I might get a little more mass in the door and reduce resonance slightly.


Would I have any issues with the door deforming? I'm thinking of doing this for a couple of my 6-panel interior molded hollow-core doors.

I think you would be risking damaging your door and have no real benefit to it. It may help for retaining temperature but you really wont get any sound benefit from that. At least not from my research.
 

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Can you just put two slab door together and add panels on each side yourself? Shouldn't be too difficult to do the paneling, you can just attach 1/2 x6" board as raised panel, the glue some small trim pieces to the panel edge to make it looks nice. I remember somewhere I saw a picture of someone doing this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Possible but I already have the door framed and ready so i will have to make due with this door.
 

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Fill the void with some 6lb desity fiberglass board and add your second layer of wood.

Don't know how much sound proofing it would offer, but it would perform better than a standard hollow core door...

if it's a two hing door, you may want to add a hinge to the center
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by KingLeerUK /forum/post/18316866


The ideas in this thread made me think of another possibility.


Assuming I wasn't after maximum sound isolation...


Could I take the average hollow core door, drill a coupld of 0.5" holes at the top and fill it with Great Stuff expanding foam? (the minimal expansion kind for use around doors/windows)


The thought here is that I might get a little more mass in the door and reduce resonance slightly.


Would I have any issues with the door deforming? I'm thinking of doing this for a couple of my 6-panel interior molded hollow-core doors.

Most hollow core doors have a honeycomb structure inside that supports the face and back skin of the door, so drilling a couple of holes in the door to add foam would only give you access to a really small portion of the inside void. The honeycomb patterns that I've seen in flush door are diamonds about 3" or 4" in size. I would guess that there is something similar in a paneled door as well.


Kevin
 

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i have a foam filled steel entry door. i cut a piece of plywood to a little over the size of the door & cut out the handle holes. i took some extra carpet i had and stapled that to the plywood. then brackets hold the carpet side to the door.


since i don't have enough extra carpet to do the inside of the door. i may get some acoustic panels and paint em. idk yet.
 
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