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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the construction phase of my HT and have run 4 20A circuits to my rack. I wasn't sure how much I would need so thought overkill was better then underpowered. I have a few questions though.


I will be using a Denon 4806, mostly as a pre/pro and had heard that I should give it a separate circuit - any thoughts?


Are there any general guidelines like amps on separate circuits or does it not really matter.


If I am using multiple circuits what is my best route to manage this power? From my BRIEF look at Monster it seems like their devices are per circuit. Does anything do multiple circuits? Any recommendations on the best power setup? The rest of my equipment will be:


Denon 3910

2 x 250w NHT sub AMPs

3 x TBD 200w+ AMPs for fronts

2 x Berkline buttkicker AMPs

Motorola HD Cable box

Xantech IR distribution block

Component video matrix switch
 

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One circuit would do you fine for that mix of gear. Four is ridiculous overkill. ;) No need to put the Denon on a separate circuit, but you could. I have all my electronics on a 15A circuit, and all the amps on a 20A (the idea being that one day the amps may need their own 20A supply). Some people run a dedicated circuit for a projector; I understand they can use a lot of juice.


Are your audio circuits on the same phase? They should be.


Do you have any lighting, dimmers, or motors on any of the circuits? On the phase?


Rather than pull this many circuits from the main panel, I would recommend a subpanel for the theater.


What type of protection are you after? What type of monitor do you have?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The projector (Optoma H78 DC3) will be on a shared circuit but the grafik eye has its own circuit. I have already pulled the 4 20Amp circuits to the rack - my Uncle is in the business and did all our wiring so it didn't cost extra. Maybe using one for the electronics and one for the AMPs would be a good idea. The protection I want is Surge but also clean power. I don't know the quality of the supply but it would seem to make sense to build this in now while I am putting it all together.


I could just leave 2 20AMP circuits spare or maybe re-route one to supply the projector?


Either way I would still have multiple circuits to protect/clean.


I am an electrical idiot so I'm not sure what you mean by phase....


thanks for your response


Piers
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by pcarey
I am an electrical idiot so I'm not sure what you mean by phase....
Most every residential circuit breaker panel receives 220v service from the transformer on the pole in the street. Phase refers to the two unbalanced halves of that service, 110v in each direction from 0v (neutral) that comprise the 220v sinewave, that feed the individual circuit breakers in two rows down the panel. Except for electric clothes dryers, a/c compressors, some heaters and furnaces, most equipment runs on 110v, a single phase.


The recommendation to keep all a/v equipment on the same circuit, or same phase when using more than one circuit, is intended to minimize the voltage difference between equipment and ground. The greater the difference, the greater the potential for audible or visible noise, as current flows from higher potential to lower potential, across component chassis and interconnects, to reach equilibrium. It's also recommended, if at all possible, to keep noise-inducing motor and compressor appliances like refridgerators, HVAC blowers, garbage disposals and the like on the opposite phase from a/v equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the explanation. I ended up using one circuit for the projector and one circuit connected to a power conditioner for the majority of the rack kit. Leaves me with 2 spare.
 

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Sorry, I missed your reply so didn't follow up. For surge protection, the best protection is a whole-house surge protector installed at the panel. Ask your uncle about it.


IMO you don't need any power conditioner unless you have crappy power. Do the houselights flicker or dim every once in a while? Maybe about the same time every day? Some supply legs are shared by industrial users (a real problem for one large computer installation I worked with - there was a printing plant [think giant motors] on the same transformer at the substation). But in residential areas power is clean. If you don't have proven crappy power, then you should save the $$ and put them into better lights or gear.
 

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While it's true that industrial power users can and do "pollute" the electrical grid with noise, I respectfully disagree that residential power is "clean." Cleaner perhaps, but in this day and age of bigger and better appliances, not to mention wireless everything, powerline noise enters the system from every house on the block and from within your own home.


Not all of it noticably impacts a/v performance. It's possible to be unaware of these effects until you put a filter or conditioner in the chain and only then might you see or hear a difference. The best defense is definitely a whole-house surge protector at the panel. For peace-of-mind and/or filtering, add point-of-use units at the receptacle end. Perceptive improvements can be non-existent to substantial. YMMV, greatly.


Another suggestion for utilizing multiple circuits in a theater, try to keep equipment on one phase and all lighting on the other, especially dimmers. Halogen dimmers are the worst for injecting RF interference into the power grid and into catv cables and a/v interconnects. A good path to ground and running noisy appliances and lights on the opposite phase from your a/v equipment can significantly lessen noise in your system.
 
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