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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am about to have to solder a couple of RCA cables in order to use my new Pass & Seymour Legrand modular wall plates.

I thought the back side of these modules were going to be a plug in type of affair, but they are going to have to solder on the RCA cable... :(


I tried to do this many years ago without much success, so can anyone give me a little direction, or what to look out for when attempting to solder you own RCA cables?


Any help is much appreciated :)
 

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Have the wire end touching the end of the rca connector and put the soldering iron on both. Have there for awhile, lets say thirty seconds, that way its good and hot, then take your rosin solder and have it touch the cable/connector, it should be hot enough that it will bead off. If it doesnt then obviously its not hot enough, or your doing something weird.
 

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Soldering light wire to a heavy connector isn't easy. Your best move may be to get solderless connectors.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
To keep from cutting my expensive Sub cable, would it be OK if I just bought a female RCA connector and soldered in a "jumpers" from the femail connector to female connector?

Should I worry about the shielding not being soldered onto the connector?
 

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I don't understand the problem. Is your sub cable too short?


How expensive was it?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF
I don't understand the problem. Is your sub cable too short?


How expensive was it?
I have a sub cable (not incredibly expensive, just a good cable) that I have fished through my attic.

Right now I just have the cable coming through a hole in the wall on both sides (one by the receiver, and one by the sub).

I just bought some Pass and Seymour Legrand modules (PS2RCA) so that I can tidy up my cabling.

I thought I was ordering an RCA module with a female on both ends, but what I received was a module with Female RCA on the outside, and solder connectors on the inside.

So, I need to somehow plug a male end (the sub cable), to the the solder connector on the inside of the PS2RCA module, while retaining the shielding etc. of the RCA sub cable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Another thing that could work is if there is a "gender changer" (female to female) connector available that has threads between the two sides, so I could sandwich the connector to a plate...

Anybody know if these are made?
 

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Bad bad catalog entry. You can't tell a darn thing about it from the PSL catalog.


I believe that keystones (the snap-in bits) are interchangable with Leviton Quikport on these plates. Home Depot carries them. The RCAs are a passthrough with female on both sides. If that doesn't work you can remove the Quikport connector, drill a blank PS2 keystone, and mount it up.


Worst case you could leave the keystone out and run the cable through the hole. Saves a connection, too.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for listening guys, I figured out what I'm going to do...

An electronics store here in town sells an RCA bulkhead that will work fine.

Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Quote:
Originally Posted by DMF
Bad bad catalog entry. You can't tell a darn thing about it from the PSL catalog.


I believe that keystones (the snap-in bits) are interchangable with Leviton Quikport on these plates. Home Depot carries them. The RCAs are a passthrough with female on both sides. If that doesn't work you can remove the Quikport connector, drill a blank PS2 keystone, and mount it up.


Worst case you could leave the keystone out and run the cable through the hole. Saves a connection, too.


Haha, that's exactly what I'm going to do, great minds think alike :) !

I can't believe I didn't think of this earlier...

One thing that really irked me is that the PS2RCA is freaking $11!

I just called the PSL special order place that I bought them from and they are letting me return them for a refund!

Thank God!
 

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Quote:
Have there for awhile, lets say thirty seconds
Thirty seconds?? That’s a good way to melt the plastic insulator that the center pin sits in.

Quote:
I have a sub cable (not incredibly expensive, just a good cable) that I have fished through my attic.
If it already has connectors on both ends, I’m going to hazard a guess that it’s not rated for in-wall use?


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Thirty seconds?? That’s a good way to melt the plastic insulator that the center pin sits in.
How else is it going to get hot enough (although now that I think of it, that is kinda long, maybe 10 secs for speaker wire)? I only suggested this because I assumed he already had the connectors, looks like he doesnt, in which case I would have scrapped his idea of soldering, and just use compression fittings.


And I do agree if that is regular sub cable with regular rcas on the ends it most likely isnt rated for in-wall use. If you havent run it already just use RG59, RG-6 cable (cable that is obviously rated for in-wall) and again use compression fittings for the ends
 

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How else is it going to get hot enough (although now that I think of it, that is kinda long, maybe 10 secs for speaker wire)?
Speaker wire?? Who’s soldering speaker wire to RCA’s? Momma, fetch my tire iron, somebody needs to be slapped silly! :D


Seriously, a good 35-40 watt iron (i.e., a little hot for the job) works best. It heats up the solder cup fast enough so you can get the iron in and out before the plastic insert melts down. As long as both the wire and cup are pre-tinned, you should be able to solder the wire to the RCA in only a couple of seconds.


Low-wattage irons are the worst for this – they take so long to heat the cup up that the heat all transfers down to the insert.


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne A. Pflughaupt
How else is it going to get hot enough (although now that I think of it, that is kinda long, maybe 10 secs for speaker wire)? /quote]Speaker wire?? Who’s soldering speaker wire to RCA’s? Momma, fetch my tire iron, somebody needs to be slapped silly! :D
Lol not me, I agree with you on your post though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wayne A. Pflughaupt
Speaker wire?? Who’s soldering speaker wire to RCA’s? Momma, fetch my tire iron, somebody needs to be slapped silly! :D
Okay. for us non-technical types, what's the problem with using speaker wire?
 

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What is the circuit for? Power to speakers?
 

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Quote:
Okay. for us non-technical types, what's the problem with using speaker wire?
First of all, probably 16 ga and certainly anything larger is too thick to fit through the opening at the end of the barrel (i.e., the screw-on piece covering the connections).


Second, even if the cable does fit, the wire itself is still too thick. The RCA’s center pin sits in a plastic (or perhaps teflon) insulator, and by the time you get the pin hot enough to solder the thick wire to it, the insulator will end up warped, if not flat-out melted.


Third, speaker cable is unshielded and should never be used for line-level signal cabling.


Regards,

Wayne A. Pflughaupt
 
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