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Discussion Starter · #1 ·

My HT room is square [ 4m x 4m x 3m(h) ]. The room mode at 45Hz is more or less tamed with deep cut in the EQ at that frequency. The room is not bare, and has quite a bit of furniture, cupboard, work desk. The sound is pretty good, nice soundstage.

 

Am having some trouble with intermittent nasal sounding vocals when watching TV shows (most often), BR demo disc (some tracks only). Am having trouble identifying the problematic frequencies so that I can try EQ'ing them out. Any ideas where to start?

 

Am going to do another REWS measure later this week.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by boxerfan88  /t/1524038/how-to-treat-intermittent-nasal-sounding-vocals#post_24521960


My HT room is square [ 4m x 4m x 3m(h) ]. The room mode at 45Hz is more or less tamed with deep cut in the EQ at that frequency. The room is not bare, and has quite a bit of furniture, cupboard, work desk. The sound is pretty good, nice soundstage.


Am having some trouble with intermittent nasal sounding vocals when watching TV shows (most often), BR demo disc (some tracks only). Am having trouble identifying the problematic frequencies so that I can try EQ'ing them out. Any ideas where to start?


Am going to do another REWS measure later this week.

Nasal colorations normally relate to the mid-upper midrange - 750-1.5 KHz. +/-

http://www.soundonsound.com/sos/dec04/articles/qa1204-4.htm


"The standard technique for identifying the offending frequency range is simply to set up a narrow-band EQ boost and sweep it across the frequencies until you find the spot where the nasal 'honk' is most pronounced. You can then place an EQ cut at this frequency, which is likely to be in the 800Hz to 1.5kHz range. Once you've found the right frequency, increase the Q to narrow the cut band until the honk just starts to come back, then reduce the Q slightly again so that you're making an EQ cut that's no wider than is really needed to get the job done. It's also a good idea not to use more cut depth than you actually need, as too much EQ is nearly always detrimental to the sound.


However, room acoustics can also cause honkiness so make sure that the room you are recording in is fairly dead-sounding. You can reduce room coloration by hanging a duvet behind your singing position to dampen any reflected sound bouncing back and into the mic. Moving slightly to one side or to just above or below the mic can soften the sound of the vocal slightly and the best way to judge this is to monitor through headphones while you sing, then move your head around until you find the best position.

"


My experience is that one always encounters sources that have some kind of coloration to an undesirable extent, but if an extraordinary number of such sources are encountered it probably suggests some kind of frequency response fault in the monitoring system more specifically the speakers and the room.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·

Thanks for the idea - setup narrow band EQ boost to find the offending frequency band. Will give it a try.
 
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