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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need to setup my NEC PG+ projector this evening. My first attempts to use powerstrip to switch my desktop to widesceen failed. My screen is 16:9 widescreen ratio so I would like my desktop to be the same.


Can someone provide the correct settings and walk me thru the setup ?


I would really appreciate it.


Thanks.
 

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I quite forget how to do this, but there's a custom resolution button someplace in the resolution controls of PowerStrip. You'll need to create a new resolution that is 16:9. I'd suggest you start with 1280x720. PowerStrip will need to restart your computer after making this change.


Its really not that hard, PowerStrip is pretty easy despite its massive number of options.
 

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I shameless stole this from Karnis' sticky thread about using custom resolutions with a TV set:

Quote:
Creating a custom resolution in PowerStrip is actually very easy, but you must have a graphics card that supports user-defined, custom resolutions, and you must know what custom resolution and timing your monitor needs.


These are the prerequisites:


A. You must be using a Matrox G-series, Parhelia, NVidia, 3dfx or ATI Radeon graphics card, with the latest driver. At this time, no other graphics chips or drivers allow custom, user-defined resolutions. Put another way: S3, SiS, Trident, Intel, and ATI Rage and Rage128 users should go no further - you are limited to the resolutions you find in Display properties. REMEMBER THE TIMINGS LISTED ABOVE ARE RADEON SPECIFIC. DO NOT USE THEM ON A GEFORCE CARD.


B. Go to Windows Display properties > Settings, and check the maximum resolution you are allowed there. There is no point in trying to create a custom resolution that *exceeds* this resolution. If the maximum is 1600x1200, don't bother with 1920x1080; if the maximum is 1280x1024, forget 1400x1050. To raise the maximum, you must tell Windows - and your display driver - that your monitor can support the resolution you want to create. Sometimes it is enough to change your monitor type in Windows Display properties > Settings > Advanced > Monitor, and sometimes some driver specific switches need to be set. TRY DOUBLE CLICKING ON THE MONITOR ICON NEXT TO THE RESOLUTION SLIDER IN THE DISPLAY PROFILES SCREEN TO UNCAP RESOLUTION RESTRICITONS.


C. You must know the resolution your monitor wants, and you must understand that not all resolutions are possible. In particular, note that graphics cards generally do horizontal timings in character clocks of 8 pixels, not individual pixels. Unless you have a Matrox Parhelia or early Kyro, your desired horizontal resolution should be evenly divisible by 8, and your vertical resolution should be an even number. If you have a plasma or LCD display that wants 1366 or 852 pixels, you will need to settle for slightly more or less. And modern graphics controllers generate interlaced resolutions with great reluctance or not at all - use progressive resolutions like 960x540p instead of 1920x1080i wherever and whenever possible. ALL THE T & R's LISTED ABOVE WORK ON MY MITS HDTV.


D. You either need to have a multisync monitor that accepts VESA timings, or you need to know the exact timing your monitor wants, or you need to be prepared for a lot of trial-and-error experimentation. All HDTVs, for example, claim support for 1080i - but no two HDTVs are actually alike or look perfect with the industry standard 1080i timing definition. If you don't know what timing your monitor wants, check with others who have the same model as you.


E. Finally, and needless to say, make sure your computer is working properly at 640x480 before you try to add more complexity to it. Don't try to set up a second head/monitor until the 1st head/monitor works very well. If you have a HDTV, set up with a regular monitor before connecting the HDTV. And remember the PowerStrip safe mode hot key - Ctrl+Alt+S by default - in case you run into trouble.


If these 5 conditions are met and understood, you create a custom resolution by following the steps below:


1. PowerStrip menu > Display profiles > Configure > Advanced timing options > Custom resolutions


2. Scroll thru the list of pre-defined resolutions to see if the one you want is already in there - if it is select it, and jump to step 4.


3. If it isn't, enter the resolution you want in the "Active pixels" properties and then adjust the timing parameters in the following order: front porch, sync width, back porch. Only after those parameters are set should you change the refresh rate values. And remember that all these values are interdependent - change one and another will necessarily change. IN THE CASE OF THIS GUIDE, SIMPLY COPY THE TIMING STRINGS AND CLICK THE PASTE BUTTON, AND THE VALUES WILL BE ENTERED AUTOMATICALLY.


4. Click "Add new resolution" and follow the instructions on screen - you will normally need to reboot to see if the resolution was accepted.


5. When Windows restarts, you will still be at the old resolution - go to Windows Display properties > Settings and see if the new resolution is now listed. Note that under XP only resolutions of 800x600 and higher will be listed - if yours is below that, click Advanced > List all modes to see if its there. If it isn't go back and make sure the prerequisites are met. If it is listed - *don't* select it... yet.


6. Make sure PowerStrip is loaded - PowerStrip isn't needed for the resolution, but it may be needed to enforce the timings you specified. Go to PowerStrip menu > Display profiles > Configure and select the resolution and then click "Apply"


7. If the screen syncs and you can see it, jump to step 8. If the screen goes blank, do absolutely nothing - PowerStrip will revert to your old resolution in seconds. OR PRESS THE ESC BUTTON. Then go back to Step 3 above and change your timing parameters - the ones you used before are wrong.


8. If you can see the screen, chances are it is less than perfect and needs fine tuning - click Advanced timing options, and make the necessary adjustments there, keeping in mind that the values here are interdepedent. SEE THE SECTION ABOVE REGARDING CORRECTING FOR OVERSCAN.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the input guys. I went home and entered the 1270x720 resolution under the advanced tab, I was asked to reboot to see if the card accepted the resolution which it did. But when I rebooted, the PJ still had the 4:3 ratio and the 16:9 desktop.


Can some one help. Just to recap, I am using an AIW 8500 video card, TT, XP pro and a NEC PG+.


Thanks.
 

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Once you reboot you need to go to the ATI control panel or PowerStrip and actually select the new resolution. Or maybe you already knew that, in which case please ignore me.
 

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Stuart's correct... Powerstrip merely adds an additional option to your resolution slider (you need to then select it in display properties).
 

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After that's done, the projector will still show the image in 4:3 mode.


You need to adjust the height of the image using the image height controls on the projector and reduce the image to 16:9 in size. This will require you to touch up geometry and convergence.
 
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