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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm currently framing out my in-wall rack and am wondering the best way to approach this problem. I'll spare you the "why," but I need to completely cut through and remove a sections of several studs (see pic) WITHOUT damaging the drywall behind it (there is a finished room on the other side).

The studs are not part of a load bearing wall, but is tight up against the drywall and probably screwed into it in several places along the lengths I need to remove.

I have a standard wood saw and a reciprocating saw, but wondering if this is an excuse to buy another tool that would make this easier?

Thanks!
 

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Cutting the timber is relatively easy but removing them will be more difficult as you have to deal with the screws or nails etc. You will have to get a saw in between the stud and drywall to cut through the screws but I cannot see how you will not have any damage as the screw head will at least move in the drywall and the hole will surely 'sink' a little. Easy to repair though.

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Coming from a 30 year general contractor, I would NOT use a sawzall or reciprocating saw, you'll move the studs enough to crack / pop the sheetrock mud off the nail heads or taped seams on the finished side. Use a hand held circular saw set as deep as it can cut, finish the cut with either a pull saw (Japanese pull saws are cool) or a small hand saw. Pull saw will be easier to control. Hope I caught you in time.
Sorry Tim, your wrong. (No disrespect intended )
Ron

Wiked makes a good point, if the nails/screws are imbedded in the section of stud you are removing your job will be harder. It can be done, I've done it, but it takes patience and the right tools.
If you can find out where the nails / screws are attached to the back side of the stud you are cutting out you can cut the wood close to the screws, then basically splinter the wood away from the screw and cut it with a dremel cutoff wheel. It takes time, but it can be done!
 

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Metal cutting blade without oscillation shouldn't be an issue.. Also from a former contractor. No disrespect taken, I just have a different experience. That's why I only buy the porter cable saw, since you can disable the blade oscillation. A Milwaukee sawzall with an aggressive wood blade probably tear the heck out of it.

However, I agree the circular saw would be a great (better) first cut, although that wasn't listed as one of the tools.

You could do the entire cut with a japanese saw without much issue.

Cutting the screws from the stud.. yeah, possible. Personally I would just pull them through and spackle the holes. Or at least go into the task knowing you will probably have to do some spackling.

Tim
 

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Dremel multi max for the win !! Just put the wood cutting blade on that and go to town. The precision it allows should make that easy and you would have a new tool
that's what I would use but I already have one. You could put the metal cutting blade and cut between the dryall and stud and get the screws also. For fine work like this Iove mine
 

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get yourself a CH Hanson magnetic stud (screw) finder. it will stick to the wall when it finds a screw, measure up from the floor then go around back and with a multi tool and a metal cutting blade do surgery on the screws. Or just use a rare earth magnet if you have one.
 

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I would first identify and remove the screws. Sure you will have to patch these holes, but you will end up patching them anyway and this is a controlled amount of damage. I like the rare earth magnet suggestion.


You only have to make 4 cuts right? I don't see that a reciprocating saw will be risk free, and I don't see how a circular saw is going to do much more than make a cut part way through the board.

I second the vote for a pull saw - I assume that is the same thing as a wire saw? Now that the screws are out you could slip the wire between the stud and drywall. Cut towards you. No damage to drywall. Gigli is a wire saw for cutting bones but not sure how many 2 X 4's it will cut without dulling Can find these on ebay. Plus you can tell everyone you built your theater using a saw for amputating legs.
 

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Do any drywall contractors use screws? Every house I've seen has nails instead of screws. If you have a nail, how do you remove it (not cut if off) without extensive damage to the drywall? I have nail pops in a number of locations, and I'd like to remove the nail and put in a screw, but I can't figure out how to do that without a lot of damage.
 

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Do it the fun way! Lean on it for an hour with a belt sander LOL
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Thanks again for everyone's suggestions on how to remove this stud (while minimizing damage to the drywall).. I wanted to report back.

My first attempt was with a small handsaw. I hoped I could cut through enough of the stud that would allow me to remove it (after locating and removing the nails on the other side). This probably would have worked if I had the patience for the sawing, but quickly decided I was spending more time trying to saw in the tight space than I would spend just repairing the drywall.

So on to Plan B: I pulled out the big reciprocating saw and went to town. After cutting through about 95% of the stud in several places, I inspected the other side and surprise... the drywall was not damaged. No nail pops or other visible sign of my carnage on the other side!

I started to feel emboldened by this "take no prisoners" approach, so I pulled out my large crowbar to pull the stud (nails and all) away from the drywall. I was prepared to see that this brute force approach would result in more damage to the finished wall, but it actually only left small holes where the nails were pulled through. Total time: about 30 minutes

So in the end, I saved a bunch of time with only minimal and easily fixable damage to the wall. No special tools, technique, or talent required!
 
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