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Hi,


Sorry for a old topic again. I just realize once again that I really don't fully understand what are these.


What is "white balance"? And what is "color temp"?


I know we're supposed to calibrate the projector for a correct D6500 grayscale (one more term. What is grayscale?) from IRE 0 (oh, I mean IRE 0.1) to IRE 100. But these are gray levels (at least on the AVIA/VE pattern images), right? Assume I can get these gray (well, 0 is black and 100 is white) steps to perfection according to a D65k measuring device, is that mean the "color" is also correct? Do I get perfect Red, perfect Green and perfect Blue? How's color intensity/saturation involve in the issue? Or besides the perfect D65k IRE 0-100, all else are personal preference? Or color accuracy has nothing to do with gray pattern and need to be calibrated separately? Do a normal ISF setup also includes "color" calibration?


Or I should really forget all these and enjoy my current wonderful picture?


Btw, how many people actually DO NOT like a correct D65K picture and go with their own setting?


Thanks in advance.


regards,


Li On
 

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Hi Li on,


White Balance is Basically the mixing of all the colors ie RGB to produce "Pure White" or as close as one can get to it.

Incorrect color balance will shift the white to whatever color has the incorrect Bias, ie to much red will give the whites a reddish look.

it can be corrected in two ways....less red or more green and blue, although removing some of the red is the prefered method.

Color temperature is the method of rating the color of the light falling on a white object or test card. ie outdoor sunlight it rated at around 5600k (The k represents kelvin, the guy who came up with all this). Indoor lighting is closer to 3200k and so on........

Any Picture you may look at has a range of intensities from blacks through to peak whites.

The Grey scale in television represents the Varying degrees of luminance the picture tube or tubes in this case can display.

Peak whites through to Pure blacks (I Hope you have a dark room and a CRT Projector!!) should all be represented. Varying contrast and brightness changes the results here.

Resultant color temps and luminance levels really only affect one thing........YOU.

So set it up to make your eyes happy and I'm sure every one else will be as well.

You Will be the one sitting in your HT most of the time so it must look good to you.

Any way enjoy.................................


John:cool:
 

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Just one small addition, Lord Kelvin developed a temperature scale using the same size degrees as centigrade degrees but much broader. Zero degrees Kelvin is absolute zero at which point all molecular motion stops. Also the Kelvins were an advanced race of people discovered around 1969 on Star Trek. I believe that the temp of a burning filament is correlated to its color so the relationship between temp and color used to describe colors and then given a color temperature.
 

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Beam me up Scotty :D
 
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