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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I unfortunetly own a 1 bedroom in a 6 floor brick building and have been getting complaints from upstairs and downstairs neighbors about the bass.


I have it calibrated to 80dbs and it sits on an auralex monitor pad to separate it from the wood floors which are 80 % covered by a light carpet.



The sub is corner loaded with one side ported facing away from the wall.

Master volume @ maybe 3, extention to 25hz.


The lady above has now complained. Is there anything I can do to keep the vibrations from running up the wall?


Should I put a shag piece of carpet under the auralex pad?


I must mention that the lady upstairs and downstairs are old like 70-80.


I usually watch w/ hk Avr 525 @ -30dbs with -15dbs being 75 dbs on the axiom bookshelf speakers.


Help I can't stand how annoying it is to hear the same complaints...


I only run the stereoup to 11pm and 12am on weekends. so its not like I am being rude.


I can't change the placement of the sub due to other furniture.
 

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I've read posts where it was recommended to put something real heavy under the sub. Like a slab of concrete or marble. I've not tried it, so can't say for sure. I does make a certain amount of sense. You might want to search this forum for more info. I don't think more carpet will do anything at subwoofer frequencies.
 

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The VTF-2 has very low distortion, so is excellent for nearfield use. Moving the sub closer to your listening position, and lowering the volume of the sub should help. Try it under a coffee table or behind your seats. Other than that, you may just have to accept the fact that you can't listen as loud as you want in your situation.


Rob
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I really have no place to move it to... sectional couch with a custom entertainment center.


I am looking into some vinyl sound absorbing mats from copmanies like acoustical solutions ,expensive stuff though.


By the way the woman complained @ 7pm sat during dinner with -30dbs on the Me'shell Peace byond passion cd... tight midbass but not loud.


thanks for the info
 

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7pm?? Wow.


Have you gone to their apartments to hear what it sounds like? Must be some thin ceilings and floors.
 

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Why do you have it calibrated to 80dB? Most receivers have test tones that are 75dB so all your speakers and sub should be set to read 75dB on the SPL meter. If you are using an AVIA/VE disc, you then put your receiver to 0 (after it is properly set) and now the test tones from these discs should be close to 85dB.


To reduce the amount of bass to your neighbors, move it out of the corner, put a concrete slab under it with thick carpeting on top of the slab. A solid slab alone like marble may actually reinfoce the bass waves coming from the sub. Put your sub in your seated area, then walk around the room and find where the sub sounds the loudest. Place the sub there (as long as it is not in a corner). This area will give you the most bass without you having to turn up the volume as much.


That is about all I can think of....unless you want to give your neighbors ear muffs or only play movies during a thunder storm...or move to a bottom floor apt with younger neighbors. :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
My net step is to go up or down and see what it sounds like.


I have the sub calibrated a few dbs hot to compensate for low volume levels.....


I have avia and will calibrate it to 75dbs this weekend.. I like tight midbass and kick drums so music wise I prefer a more "rock eq"


I will try the slab plus carpet technique. I already have that auralex monitor pad that was like $50.


I would like to add some wall treatments but the wife won't go for anything ugly.
 

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Hi,


Your neighbors are pricks. Hopefully at least they're coming down and telling you in person, and not just banging on the walls (that drives me NUTS, if you've got a problem at least have the moxie to tell someone you do...)


Even if you drop the gain on the sub, calibrate it at a lower SPL, they're still going to complain. Bass permeates EVERYTHING. heh. Putting a slab of concrete underneath the sub isn't going to do a damn thing. ESPECIALLY not for your UPSTAIRS neighbor...


You should move, or wait for them to shuffle off their mortal coil.


Apartment living is not well suited to hifi, that's just something that you have to accept.


I'd suggest getting a nice pair of headphones with crossfeed. That way you get halfway decent audio, and your neighbors won't whine at you.


Or maybe buy your neighbors some really nice earplugs. heh.


-kevin
 

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I agree that there is nothing as far as dampening that is going to change the fact that your neighbors are being disturbed by your subwoofer.


I might suggest that you bring a vtf-3 into the apartment for a couple of weeks and play it continuously at reference volume. After that time, they may be better able to appreciate your vtf-2 and the relatively low volume you listen to it at.
 

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(Hi guys - new forum member - been viewing for a few weeks and decided to register)

I agree it's tough living in an apartment and enjoying good music, but after a lot of reading and asking, this is what I've worked out and so far (knock wood) no complaints. Maybe you can use some of these ideas (some have already been mentioned). Most of them are sacrifices in sound quality, but it's a trade-off.


* Get a sub that fires out, not down.

* What you put under the sub does not matter.

* Keep the sub away from the walls, and keep it near your main listening place (so you can keep the gain down).

* The lower frequencies travel through the walls the easiest, so get a sub that either doesn't produce the low frequencies (e.g., Adire Rava), or a sub that can be tuned up by you or the manufacturer (e.g., SVS).

* Once a neighbor complains, they will be sensitive to the noise and more likely to complain in the future. So the trick is to not get them to complain the first time.


Personally I think the Rava is an ideal sub for apartment life (yes, I got one recently). I even think Adire should include this in their marketing. It is clean sound, but only goes down to about 30hz (more or less), it fires out (not down), it is a sealed box (so it is easier to place), it is about the right size to be a decent end table or ottoman, and it isn't ugly.


That's all I've got. Good luck.

Marie
 

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Don't assume that the neighbor is being rude just because it doesn't seem loud in your apartment. Bass does funny things when it moves through walls.


I had a situation a while back, when my wife was pregnant with our first child. It was 2am or 3am and the guy in the apartment next door, whom I had never met, was CRANKING the music. I am a loud music kind of guy (i.e. "800 watts of JL Audio power in the car" kind of guy), but this "THUMP, THUMP, THUMP" was way out of line. My wife had trouble getting any sleep at that point in her pregnancy which meant I didn't get much sleep which meant I was CRANKY.


So, I went next door to complain vehemently to my neighbor. I was pretty ticked off but was scared sh*tless when my neighbor opened the door and he was about 6'8", 250 lbs. Yikes. Well, at least I didn't yell obscenities through the door. I explained the situation calmly (like I had a choice) and he was extremely cool about it, but puzzled.


When I got into his apartment, the music was VERY low, to the point where I thought perhaps the thumping was coming from elsewhere. If roles had been reversed, I would have thought I was nuts for complaining.


However, a bit of testing with my neighbor and I running between apartments we figured out that his medium sized floor standing speakers right up against the wall were transmitting one particular range of frequencies (60-80Hz or so, I assume that was the resonating frequency of the wall) through the wall at a much higher volume (by 20dB or so) than it was in the neighbors apartment.


Moving the speakers away from the wall resulted in only a slight difference in sound for the neighbor but a huge improvement for us.


Moral of the story: sound does strange things. Definitely check what it's like in your neighbor's apartment and, assuming it is even slightly annoying, be as accomodating as you can, your future tenancy in that apartment depends on it.



Bill
 
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