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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How often do you dust your HT components and what do you use? I dust every 5 days and use Endust For Electronics. My PC monitor gets a wipe down every other day. Between my PC system and my HT my room is full of dust 24/7.


Steve
 

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Sounds to me like you need a device that will remove the dust from the room before it gets on the equipment. For along time Ive been meaning to demo one of those sharper image "filters" because of its no noise operation.
 

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I use Endust for electronics also. I did however notice a huge reduction in the amount of dust that was in my HT after we replaced our vaccum. We went from a regular old bag vaccum to a relatively inexpensive bagless (I want to say electrolux but not 100% sure). It has some kind of filter or other in the back of it. Works great.
 

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Ha! If it was at all inexpensive, it wasn't Electrolux.


Steve:

Try a HEPA filter or a charcoal based filter in the room. Or even one attached to the furnace to cover the whole house. That may be harder to pull off (you're at your parent's, right?). The filters may be a little noisy due to fans, but you can always turn them off when you want it quiet.


I'm not sure what kind of filter you mean, Ciper, but I'd stay away from anything but HEPA or charcoal with an actual fan. The non-fan ionization type, for example, are gimmicky and often don't work nearly as well. Many are combo units with ionization and a HEPA filter, which work great. My wife has many allergies and asthma, I am fast becoming an expert on air quality. Charcoal is for protection from odors and chemicals. HEPA is to clean general dust and pollen from the air. Here's some examples from my wife's favorite channel:

http://www.qvc.com/asp/frameset.asp?...esc=air+filter
http://www.qvc.com/asp/frameset.asp?...esc=air+filter
 

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I would also stay away from those "ionization" filters. They generate Ozone and according to the research my house inspector has done (I unfortunately don't have any of the original scientific articles) those things can be very harmful to your health...:eek:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Quote:
Originally posted by Spiky
you're at your parent's, right?.
Yup
Quote:
Originally posted by Spiky
Try a HEPA filter or a charcoal based filter in the room.
Thanks for all the ideas guys! I took a look at the fliters on iQVC. I really like the Honeywell 360 Large Area HEPA Air Purifier (first one on list). How much electricity do air purifiers use and during the summer I have a window air conditioner, would that effect anything?


Thanks a bunch,

Steve
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by imlucid
I would also stay away from those "ionization" filters. They generate Ozone and according to the research my house inspector has done (I unfortunately don't have any of the original scientific articles) those things can be very harmful to your health...:eek:
I just want to say that there are ozone machines, which use the same technology, more or less, as ion air cleaners. Ozone (O3)machines can be dangerous since they suck the O2 (breathable oxygen) out of the air. However, most ion cleaners are not of this specific type. They are targeting particles in the air, not O2.


Steve, they don't use as much electricity as the A/C. In reality, they're just a fan blowing air through a very good filter, so they use about the same amount of electricity as a comparable power fan. But you probably run them more so it adds up a bit more than a fan.


If the A/C is on the same circuit as your equipment, watch out for using the auto-on/off settings. The major spikes and valleys could wreak havoc if your HT is not properly protected.
 

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I tried one of those electronic air cleaners from Sharper Image. The device had a low but audible hum during operation. That bugged me. The thing that prompted its return was the definite smell of ozone in the room. Even though it isn't designed to generate ozone, it does.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Guy Kuo
I tried one of those electronic air cleaners from Sharper Image. The device had a low but audible hum during operation. That bugged me. The thing that prompted its return was the definite smell of ozone in the room. Even though it isn't designed to generate ozone, it does.
Ozone does not have an odor.
 

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Just to set the record straight, ozone does have an odor. It is a pungent odor that can be smelled around electrical arcing. The arcing causes the O2 molecules to combine into an O3 form which is ozone.

rrudy
 

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I believe you are misleading people regarding whether ozone has an odor. See

http://www.hankinozone.com/msds.html


Where it states....


Section 1- Product identification

Product Name: Ozone

Synonyms: Triatomic Oxygen, O3

Chemical Family: Oxidizer

Molecular Formula: O3

Molecular Weight: 48.0

Section 2 - Hazardous Ingredients


Components: Ozone Gas

Concentration: 0-20% by weight

Gas Registry Number: 10028-15-6

Section 3 - Physical Data


Boiling Point: -111.9 C

Melting Point: -192.7 C

Solubility in Water by weight at 20 C: 0.003 g/l (3 ppm)

Vapor Density(air =1)


Appearance and Odor: Ozone is colorless at all concentrations experienced in industry. It has a very pungent characteristic odor usually associated with electrical sparks. Ozone odor is generally detectable at concentrations of 0.02-0.05 ppm.




The EPA also states that ozone has an odor . See http://www.epa.gov/iaq/pubs/ozonegen.html


Which states


In addition to adjusting the control setting to the size of the room, users have sometimes been advised to lower the ozone setting if they can smell the ozone. Unfortunately, the ability to detect ozone by smell varies considerably from person to person, and one?s ability to smell ozone rapidly deteriorates in the presence of ozone. While the smell of ozone may indicate that the concentration is too high, lack of odor does not guarantee that levels are safe.



Then also UC Davis's document http://www-ehs.ucdavis.edu/sftynet/sn-63.html


states.... At concentrations below about 1 part per million (ppm), ozone has a pleasant and characteristic odor, described as the "charged" odor of the air following a thunderstorm. Concentrations above 2 ppm have a very pungent, chlorine-like odor.



PraxAir a producer of industrial gases http://www.ptoc.com/safety.html



states... Ozone is an irritant, and prolonged breathing of concentrations in excess of 1 PPM/V should be avoided. The sharp odor of ozone is the best indication of its presence. Ozone can be readily detected at concentrations of 0.1 PPM/V or less (0.01 PPM/V is the recognized odor detection threshold). Therefore, if there is no detectable odor of ozone the operator may assume that the work area is safe to enter.

http://www.qrc.com/hhmi/science/labs...t/lcsstx66.htm

states....

Substance


Ozone

CAS 10028-15-6


Formula


O [[3]]


Physical Properties


Colorless to bluish gas

bp -112 °C, mp -193 °C

Almost insoluble in water (0.00003 g/100 mL at 20 °C)


Odor


Pungent odor, detectable at 0.01 to 0.04 ppm; sharp disagreeable odor at 1 ppm


http://www.trio3.com/materialSafety.htm states....


SECTION 3 ? PHYSCIAL DATA


Coiling Point -169.42oF (-111.9oC) Melting Point -315.4oF (-193oC)


Vapor Pressure >1 ATM % Volatile by Volume 100


Water Solubility Negligible Molecular Weight 48 Grams/Mole


Density of Gas (Air=1) 1.6 pH Not Listed


Critical Temperature 10.22oF (-12.1oC)


Appearance and odor. Blue-colored gas or liquid; characteristic odor often associated with electrical sparks or lightning in concentrations of less than 2 ppm.


COMMENTS: The pungent characteristic odor of ozone is detectable above 0.01 ppm and becomes disagreeable (sulfur like) above 1 to 2 ppm.


CAUTION: Olfactory fatigue develops rapidly so do not use odor as preventative warning device.


http://www.ozonelife.org/whatIsOzone.htm clearly indicates....


Ozone (O3), triatomic allotrope of oxygen (a form of oxygen in which the molecule contains three atoms instead of two as in the common form) that accounts for the distinctive odor of the air after a thunderstorm or around electrical equipment. The odor of ozone around electrical machines was reported as early as 1785; ozone's chemical constitution was established in 1872. Ozone is an irritating, pale blue gas that is explosive and toxic, even at low concentrations.

http://www.me.cc.va.us/dept/ietech/w...ozonation3.htm

states.....


Safety of Ozone


The Maximum Allowable Concentration (MAC) of ozone in air, as established by the American Council of Governmental Industrial Hygienists is 0.1 ppm by volume for continuous human exposure. The threshold odor of ozone is 0.01 ppm. This means a person working near an ozone-handling area should be able to detect the presence of ozone at levels far below the MAC. The odor of ozone has been described as similar to that of cloves, new mown hay, nitric acid, etc., depending on the concentration. Concentrations greater than 1 ppm are extremely pungent and are considered unsafe for prolonged human exposure, and therefore should be avoided.




"Anyone else want to negotiate?"
 
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