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Discussion Starter #1
Finally decided to get beyond the 56k dialup. I am entirely new to cable modem, was thinking DSL but not available in my area. I never had cable only Dish and DSS. So this will be a complete install taking the advantage of a new ATT promotion.


My questions are,


1) What online resources I can find on cable modem?

2) Can I buy my own cable modem, instead of using one provided by my cable company?

3) I want my other computer having access also, can I just split the cable from the cable modem so both can be used at the same time? If so what extra hardware is needed?

4) If 3) is not possible, I heard there are either wired or wireless options, can any one give me an overview on these options?

5) Is it possible to have both computer connected simultaneously to cable modem service?


Thanks in advance.
 

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The best site for info about sharing your cable connection (home network, routers, wireless, etc.) is http://www.practicallynetworked.com/ You can use a hardware router to split the connection to 4 or more PCs - it works great and also acts as a firewall. Much simpler and safer than software setups at a
 

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Previous recommendation was v. good.


Just get a cable/DSL router that you plug into the cable modem, and then plug your computers into the router. Prices on them are dropping every day -- I saw one in an ad for about $75 whereas mine was twice that a year ago. Mine has four ports for four PCs. Some minor set up to get them working but it only takes a few minutes and is very straightforward. Also lets you network the PCs one to another and to printers, etc. so it is A Good Thing.


If you don't have network cards for your PCs you'll have to get those too, but they are $10 or less, and usually set themselves up when you install them under Windows, so no hassle there.


The routers also come in wireless versions but cost quite a bit more ($300 or so I think?), and then you have to get wireless net cards for the computers too, which are also pricey at present. But if you can't easily run the network cables to all the PCs then you might have to go this route. I think there might be some versions that plug into your house phone or electrical wiring but not sure how well those work.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the advice. One more question, if I can get a compatible cable modem, can I install in my third computer, connect to its cable outlet, install the software ATT give me for my first computer, and have this third computer access to broadband internet service, without anything to do with the first computer? Or is this up to my cable provider whether they will allow me to do so. If this is possible, can my 1st and 3rd computer sign on to the same service simultaneously?


I hope the question make sense. The third computer is in a remote room, impossible to hot wire, and I have pretty much ruled out wireless networking. Only the 1st and 2nd computers are close enough to network.
 

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to have two different connections signed on, you will most likely need two accounts. I would think that the installer would run an additional outlet for a fee but it wouldn't be usable simultaneously with other outlets. That is what the router/firewall would be for. Networking cable is pretty versatile to run to other rooms however.


The cable will probably be split before it enters your house. One for data and one for cable tv.
 

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I suggest you get the cablemodem for one computer. Buy a cable modem/DSL router and hook up your cable modem to the router. Then, on the network (Cat5 ) ports on the cable modem hook up each computer. (Each computer needs a LAN card installed). There should be an onscreen menu to set up the IP addresses for each computer.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Quote:
Originally posted by hmcgrath
to have two different connections signed on, you will most likely need two accounts. I would think that the installer would run an additional outlet for a fee but it wouldn't be usable simultaneously with other outlets. That is what the router/firewall would be for. Networking cable is pretty versatile to run to other rooms however.


The cable will probably be split before it enters your house. One for data and one for cable tv.
I don't have to have the two computers in the front (one HTPC, the other for work), and the 3rd in the back signed on to internet at the same time. I will ask ATT whether they can add a separate modem for my third PC. But from what little experience I have with my cable company, they will not be helpful.


My problem is I don't want to run another Cat5 to the back room, which is remote and no easy access. But it is prewired for cable, although never used.


From what you are saying, cable modem run and cable TV run are two separate runs? I thought I can just split at the outlet and use one for cable modem, one for TV? Am I wrong about that?
 

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If AT&T is anything like Time-Warner/RoadRunner, they'll be glad to give you a 2nd modem... for another $50/month. The only economical solution is to get the router. It may be more expensive up front, but it'll pay for itself FAST. Here in Austin TW/RR wants another $15 per each additional IP address. Guess I shouldn't tell them I've got 9 computers (probably 10 after tonight) behind the one IP they give me ;).


One solution for your networking might be PNA. Basically you can network over existing phone line, I believe it's 11Mbps currently. I don't know of an easy way to mix Ethernet and PNA though, you'd probably need a special router unless you could go all PNA, and I don't know the availability of Cable/PNA routers.


As far as splitting the cable line, people have reported differing results, but the fact is that the cable company uses a special splitter to run to the cable modem. It limits the bandwidth of the signal to the modem so it gets a cleaner connection. Some people have said they've moved their modem to a regular cable drop and it works fine. YMMV but personally I always use the designated line, living in older neighborhoods I get a noisy cable signal anyway.


-will
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Even my phone lines aren't the same one front and back. I guess I will just leave the back room computer on the stone age dialup for now until I can find a way to pull a cat5 there.
 
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