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Ideally I would like to have my DVD collection all on one hardrive and then sorted by genre, artist etc. Similar to a escient but not limited to a 400 dvd changer. I am leaning toward a HTPC not only for this but the many other abilities they have.

Question? can I use an external hard drive loaded with my dvd collection with an HTPC and acheive what I am looking for.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by augieboy /forum/post/14224948


Ideally I would like to have my DVD collection all on one hardrive and then sorted by genre, artist etc. Similar to a escient but not limited to a 400 dvd changer. I am leaning toward a HTPC not only for this but the many other abilities they have.

Question? can I use an external hard drive loaded with my dvd collection with an HTPC and acheive what I am looking for.

You can use internal, external HDD or server to do what you want.

You can use MM to do some of what you want.

You can use this way to back up your DVD to an ISO and store to any above I mentioned but make sure enable AnyDVD and disable AnyDVD HD if you plan to do BD.

Quote:
Originally Posted by stanger89 /forum/post/14225183

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...highlight=48tb

No offense but based on his question 48TB RAID 5 is more than he can handle/think of today
Actually to most users as well...
 

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When you rip the dvds if you take out all the menus and behind the scenes crap that nobody watches the average dvd is 3-4gb in size. (standard def anyways) So throw in a couple 500gb hard drives and you've got plenty of storage. A htpc is a dvd player on steriods. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by hlkc /forum/post/14225672


No offense but based on his question 48TB RAID 5 is more than he can handle/think of today
Actually to most users as well...

The question seemed to be more "is it possible" than "how do you...", and as such, what better example of what's possible than that.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by drunkpenguin /forum/post/14226344


When you rip the dvds if you take out all the menus and behind the scenes crap that nobody watches the average dvd is 3-4gb in size. (standard def anyways) So throw in a couple 500gb hard drives and you've got plenty of storage. A htpc is a dvd player on steriods. The possibilities are limited only by your imagination!

So here is a question re file sizes.


Is it true that the size I should expect my DVD rips to end up is truly 3-4gb each in size? I've been using Handbrake on my Mac to rip my DVDs to hard drive using the AppleTV canned settings, and they all play back beautifully on my AppleTV (which I may end up returning for other reasons). I'd like to rip my collection, or at least a good portion of it, to the hard drive, but I'm trying to figure out how much HDD capacity I'll need.


I'm curious because on those rare occasions I check out the darker areas of internent I see that downloading a movie via ********** seems like a full 2 hour movie, even HD versions, shows up as being around 700mb per film (at SD quality) and perhaps 1-2 gb per title for HD rips. Yet ripping my own SD-DVD library (500+ titles) I can only manage 3-4gb per film? (I keep my movie titles legal, and only rip DVDs I actually own, but occasionally download a TV show here and there when I miss an episode, just to watch and delete, so I do see what's out there)


Conversion from my physical DVDs to H.264 is a slow process, so it's going to take me some time to fill up the 750gb USB hard drive I picked up for this, but it seems to me even that fairly large drive is not going to cut it. At 4gb per disk, with 700gb formatted capacity, I figure I'll only be able to get ~175 DVDs ripped.


Eventually I think I will go to a Drobo which will hold 4 drives, so I can stick 4x 1tb drives in and get something like 2.5-3tb of safe, usable space, which will definitely help things along (and keep them safe) but at the moment I have what I have, and I want to keep the ball rolling. I'm just a bit surprised by the file sizes I'm seeing, compared to what I see elsewhere online. Are the codecs that much more efficient than h264, or are the bitrates drastically reduced, or what?


Thanks for any guidance...
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalani /forum/post/14337911


Is it true that the size I should expect my DVD rips to end up is truly 3-4gb each in size?

That 3-4gb is without encoding to divx, xvid, h.264, etc. Just straight ripping from the DVD. That translates to no quality loss and faster archiving time at the expense of storage space.


If you convert your DVDs, then you can get much smaller files with marginal quality loss at the expense of hours (maybe even days, weeks or months) of encoding time. The question is, is the trade-off worth it for you?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by ilovejedd /forum/post/14338153


That 3-4gb is without encoding to divx, xvid, h.264, etc. Just straight ripping from the DVD. That translates to no quality loss and faster archiving time at the expense of storage space.


If you convert your DVDs, then you can get much smaller files with marginal quality loss at the expense of hours (maybe even days, weeks or months) of encoding time. The question is, is the trade-off worth it for you?

I'm using Handbrake, as I said, with the canned AppleTV profile selected. This means converting a physical DVD to H.264, avg bitrate= 2500 (I think), etc. It is producing files ranging from 2.0-3.5gb per film, perhaps I could have been more clear with that, but it didn't seem that far out of what others in the thread were saying, and either way, it's still a far cry from the files I'm seeing online, which is what prompted my query.


As for time, I'm not in a huge hurry right now, so I'm fine with the trade-off. I have a computer in the living room that is rarely used, so I pop in a DVD, click the Go button, and walk away until morning. Pop a new one in, go to work. Come home, rinse, repeat. I get about 2 disks per day done that way, and it's working fine. Yes, it'll take a while to do the whole collection, but again, I'm in no hurry at the moment.
 

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To be more explicit, based on the rip that just finished:


HandBrake, using AppleTV preset:


House of Flying Daggers DVD is ripped to H.264, avg bitrate 2500kbps, codec is AVC/H264 Video, AAC+AC3 Audio. (All straight defaults from AppleTV preset... nothing monkeyed with)


Produces a file: HouseOfFlyingDaggers.m4v that is 2.4gb.


Looking at the other files I've ripped, so far the smallest (History of the World) is 1.81 gb, and the biggest (Knocked Up) is 2.89 gb.


Still, the crux of the question is that all of these seem a lot bigger than the ones I'm seeing for download from ********** sites... especially if you seem to think this is a straight rip that isn't saving me any space. I may as well grab the whole ts_video folder and keep all the special features!
 

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There are many other codecs besides h264/AAC.


Some video codecs include DivX, Xvid, WMV9, MPEG, MPEG2, and many others.


Audio codecs include MP3, AAC, AC3, FLAC, and many others.


Containers for these formats include .AVI, .MPG, .VOB, .MP4, .WMV, .MKV, and many others.


Typically, a standard DVD will have a bitrate of around 4000 - 9000 depending on the studio/quality, and have a corresponding size of 4 - 9 GB as standard .VOB files using the MPEG2/AC3 codecs.


Using various re-encoding methods (you choose to use handbrake), one may achieve smaller and smaller file sizes at the expense of quality. For example, it's possible to re-encode a 6 GB two hour movie from DVD (.VOB/MPEG2) format using DivX/MP3 codec to output a file size of around 700 MB with .AVI extensions, but the bitrate will be substantially reduced (to say 800 - 900).


For your example, re-encoding to h264 @ 2500 bitrate is reducing the file sizes by greater than 50% with minimal loss of quality, albeit all those videos are now in h264/AAC format with .MOV/.MP4 extensions. You may want to experiment with that bitrate; by reducing it you will notice a reduction in file size, but I personally would not go below, say, 1500 for quality sake.


Taking into consideration the size of your collection, you may want to just do a straight rip of your DVDs, stripping out all the extras and keeping just the main movie. You will still average around 4-5 GB per movie, but it will save endless hours of re-encode time and stress on your optical drives.


IMO, with 1TB drives approaching $150, re-encoding vs. straight ripping is becoming pointless if your collection is greater than a few dozen titles.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Kalani /forum/post/14338894


House of Flying Daggers DVD is ripped to H.264, avg bitrate 2500kbps, codec is AVC/H264 Video, AAC+AC3 Audio. (All straight defaults from AppleTV preset... nothing monkeyed with)


Produces a file: HouseOfFlyingDaggers.m4v that is 2.4gb.


Looking at the other files I've ripped, so far the smallest (History of the World) is 1.81 gb, and the biggest (Knocked Up) is 2.89 gb.

Movie-only rips, with no recompression run 4-6GB with an average of about 5GB, so that seems pretty reasonable to me, about a 30-50% reduction.

Quote:
Still, the crux of the question is that all of these seem a lot bigger than the ones I'm seeing for download from ********** sites...

I'd guess they're either resized, or lower quality, or this or that. Net net is, IMO it's not worth the trouble, at $0.20/GB or less for HDDs these days, my time is worth more than the HDD space.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rob_Esc /forum/post/14339042


There are many other codecs besides h264/AAC.


Some video codecs include DivX, Xvid, WMV9, MPEG, MPEG2, and many others.

But none of them (save VC-1) are near as efficient as H.264, especially MPEG-2 or MPEG-1.
 

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Thanks, guys.


I know well that there are other codecs, but prefer to to use H.264 for reasons of Mac/iTunes/AppleTV/FrontRow compatibility. I just wanted to confirm that I wasn't missing out on some super-amazing codec that was going to deliver HD quality at a filesize of considerably LESS than I am getting my SD DVD's ripped to. Sounds like the files on "those sites" have simply traded bitrate for quality, even if they are "technically" HD, so I'm still ahead of the game there... mostly.


I'll have to do some thinking about copying the whole DVD (and ditching the bits that I don't want) vs. doing my current Handbrake encoding of just the main feature. Giving up the special features (at least, those few that I actually want), directors commentary, and subtitles (again, on those few titles where subtitles apply), is the main thing I dislike about the current ripping paradigm. But I'm not seeing a good way to make the ATV (or FrontRow?) work as seamlessly with the extras DVD offers at this point, without some serious hacking of the ATV, which I'm not terribly interested in doing at this time.


1tb drives may be under $100 now (bare), but making everything work together is still costing enough to notice. I'll be pretty happy once I get a Drobo, but that's a ways off since I have little extra budget right now and that's $350-500 before putting a single drive in it, so I'll have to make do with this little Maxtor 750 for now. Fortunately, at this slow rate, it's going to be a while before I fill up the 700gb I have available to play with, so that's a concern for farther down the road.


At this point, I'm fighting with my wife to even keep the ATV, since she found out I'm not going to be able to get rid of the media racks in the living room just by adding it to our arsenal. Although she really liked the immediate rental options this weekend, so perhaps I'll talk her into keeping it yet.
 
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