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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have seen a number of posts here where members have constructed hushboxes for their projector. I am a newbie owner of an NEC VT540 and the hush part hasn't been a problem for me. However, I am getting phobic about the dust. The projector now resides on my a/v rack and I find myself cleaning the dust off of it quite often. I am sure many of you have noticed with your own racks how much dust can build up there. I am worried this dust could get inside my projector and play havoc with my lcd panel. Am I being too cautious here? Does this really warrant concern? Has anyone ever built anything like this before? Any suggestions on how I might go about building something like this if there is reason for concern?


Thanks.

JP
 

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You can do such, but it is also a concern insofar as the polarity of the dust particles. A hepa filter system for your LCD unit is a good idea as preventive maintainence. A smoke eater, or ionizer is also a good way to clean the particles out of the air. Not just smoke, but dust particles, period. A bit of each will keep the contrast range of your unit a max as long as possible. I just cleaned out a 1024 rez LCD unit, right down tot he prism assembly components, and it does make a solid difference in the last bit of contrast range for video use. This unit was internally clean,as was the fan/filter assembly, and it still made a noticable difference in the max contrast range. Never run your LCD if someone has been smoking or the stove was used recently... The prism/LCD assembly is directly cooled, and the temperature differental and other specific problems, will cause the particles to bond to the prism/lcd surfaces.The ionizer changes the polarity of the particles, so bonding to surfaces becomes less of a problem. This also works for DLP units, their spinning color wheels can have exactly this particle bonding problem. Max contrast range can easily be skewed, even in 3-500 hour units. Clean your air with an ionizer, so it never becomes a problem.


PC desktop and gaming doen't show trhe benifit as much, but it is slightly noticable. Without the dust, the levels of internal reflection has decreased, and the video S/N improved slightly. Due to the very complex lightpath of a LCD unit, this is a major concern. I know of a guy that was told he could install a LCD unit in a country bar,and did. Now, that unit was a mess... I had brown goo coming off of ALL of the optical components. Hell, the PJ wouldn't even power up. Most folks would not even of repaired the unit. it was trashed. The dirt had destroyed the diffusive coating (due to temp increase, the coating had gone black) on the first lens/(collimnator)? in front of the bulb. Heck, I was cleaning the bulb assembly as well!!


The inside of the unit looked like a 10-year old TV set from a very smoky/dusty bar... yet it was 14 months old.


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Ken Hotte

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[This message has been edited by KBK (edited 06-03-2001).]
 

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Ken - Would the ionizer need to be placed near the air intakes of the projector or will anywhere in the room work just as well? Also, would the ionizer need to be run all the time or just when the projector is on? Lastly, do you know of a particular ionizer that you would recommend for this particular application? Thanks!


kmartin
 

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Ken,


How good does that ionizer work against larger fabric fibers like from carpets? From my years of digging through PCs I've come across many boxes that were so overgrown with dust it's a miracle the power supply didn't take fire more often. The worst cases had always been in carpeted rooms. It's no wonder I put my foot down and got angry when the interior decorators for the new building at work wanted to put carpets in my lab - but that's a different story http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif .


Anyway I can certainly see a hushbox designed with a dust filter to help the situation. The ideal environment would be dust free, but since the majority of home theaters are either placed in a basement - or carpeted for better audio I don't see that happening. Cleaning the projector with a vacuum cleaner like Grant suggested in another thread (on the outside and through the vents - not open it up) is probably a good idea too.


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/frode
 

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The idea of using the ioniser is to create a situation where the particles of dirt in the air have their polarity changed.. so they stick together, and fall to the floor.. you end up with that 'clean air after a thunderstorm' feel and smell in a room. So, a $150 ioniser will actually work quite well,at the same time it makes you feel better, and is healthier. A 'BOINARE' brand air cleaner-ionizer works qouite well. They have carbon filters on them. Depending on the unit, you can get new filters, or get one that can have the filters cleaned. they also produce ozone, so watch out for over use. Most of the modern units are filter/ionizers as a combination. They really do clean the room's aitr up and make you feel better, expecially in a basement room, where the bad air likes to collect. i was lucky, I manged to run into a commerical grade ioniser. It retailed for about $1K, and I managed to pick it up for $35, almost new. I still need the air cleaneeer to be msot effective, though. It's not just for HT use, it's a general health rule. Most people feel the HT part is bonus.. but we know better. Around here.. the health part is the bonus part!


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Ken Hotte

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This made me think about the thread about fireplaces and projectors.. I guess you'd have to be careful not to let the fire smoke too much.


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NextGuard = Paul from Atlanta
 
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