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Discussion Starter #1
 http://www.sabayonlinux.org/


This distro is ideal for HTPC use because it comes with ATI and nVidia drivers. This is the first distro that I have been able get to run at 1920x1080. I am a Linux noob and I don't have a clue how to install a driver.


Sabayon is the prettiest OS I've ever seen. It's across from Vista and OSX. It has all kinds of flair. For example when you move a window is wobbles like jello briefly!


If you get the DVD is comes with a ton of software. It even has Google Earth on board. Again, this is nice because I have tried many times to install Google Earth on Linux and failed.


My goal is to get a MythTV box going. This is going to be a challenge, because I don't have a clue how to install something in Linux. I'm used to Windows where you just double click on something and it installs. This approach does not seem to work in Linux.


Anyway, be sure to try this distro out. It's literally the 10th distro I've tried and none of the others come close to its functionality.


If anybody knows of a Installing MythTV for the Complete Idiot Tutorial I would greatly appreciate it!
 

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Sabayon is gentoo based so many of the gentoo how-tos will apply (for learning about how to install software and mythtv).

http://www.sabayonlinux.org/wiki/ind..._Portage_Guide

Will help you learn about merge and portage for installing apps. Note that installing apps in different distros of linux is different.

http://www.sabayonlinux.org/wiki/ind...e=Setup_Mythtv


For mythtv in Sabayon. Gentoo how-tos will probably work to (Gentoo how-tos/documentation are usually pretty good and useful for other distros!)
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rgb /forum/post/0


Google Earth installs without issue with Grandma-ease in Ubuntu using a few clicks with Automatix.


MythTV can be installed with a few GUI clicks from the Synaptic manager in Ubuntu.


VIdeo drivers also install from Automatix in Ubuntu.

I do have to agree. Installing mythtv in Ubuntu is about as easy as it gets... Mythdora and Knoppmyth not withstanding.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I've messed around with Ubuntu before, and I agree that it is fabulous. But it simply will not work on the particular PC that I am using.


Thank you for the tutorials. Now I see why Microsoft is still in business. I have a lot of experience building and troubleshooting Windows PCs, but this whole business with installing programs using a command line interface seems extremely complicated. I'm certainly going to try to figure it out.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris5977 /forum/post/0


I've messed around with Ubuntu before, and I agree that it is fabulous. But it simply will not work on the particular PC that I am using.


Thank you for the tutorials. Now I see why Microsoft is still in business. I have a lot of experience building and troubleshooting Windows PCs, but this whole business with installing programs using a command line interface seems extremely complicated. I'm certainly going to try to figure it out.

It's not complicated, it's just different than what you are used too. I actually prefer it. In many distros, you don't need to install programs from command line. For instance in debian based distros (like ubuntu) you could just download a .deb for your particular release and double click on it to install it, just like you would in windows. It it also has synaptic and adept for installing programs via GUI. Despite those methods, I use ubuntu and use the command line to both search for and install programs. And my windows experience is longer than my Linux experience. In many cases the command line can be more efficient to do many tasks.


Gentoo is considered a slightly more advanced and less user friendly distro than many others. but you often learn more about linux by learning gentoo since it likes to compile programs from source.
 

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Mythdora is the only myth distro I recommend these days... right out of the box I was getting XvMC nvidia working... Can't say that for knoppmyth or ubuntu...


ETA: also, sound was working 100% out of the box as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wow, I've never heard of Mythdora. I'll give it a shot. Thanks, Goofygrin!


and NewLinux


installing programs in Linux IS difficult if you have no idea where to even start. For example I don't have a clue what the following terms mean:


.deb

synaptic

adept

compile

source


Anyway, one of the reasons I'm doing this is because I wanted to learn my way around Linux. I'll figure it out.
 

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chris5977 -- Yes Linux doesn't work like Windows. I found a ton of information on how to install stuff in Ubuntu from the Community pages. Here is the starting link: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/ .


I would recommend getting the latest (Ver 7.04 = Feisty Fawn) version from here: http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/down...irect=download . I did a test install on an old laptop (vintage 2002) and it worked better (with full hardware support) than the earlier versions. I am also a "noobie" to Linux. I've looked into it years ago and got turned off, because of all the difficulties involved. The new distros have come a long way since then.


How to install programs in Feisty is covered in these pages: https://help.ubuntu.com/7.04/ . The advantage of Ubuntu is the regular release/update schedule. The latest stuff is readily available and supported. Their GUI allows you to do almost everything graphically (drag & drop, copy/paste, add/remove, etc.) even though the command line is required for some lower level details (which MS tries very hard to hide from us).


If you have experience with Windows, you should have no problems (once you get over the MS Windows "think" mode, but then I cut my PC teeth on the old DOS versions). I've found these help files to be really helpfull, especially compared to the MS version of "help".


I've also gotten a lot of good help from some Unbuntu books that I bought from the Amazon.com bookstore. I can PM the titles to you, if you're interested.


BTW, the distro you mentioned ( http://www.sabayonlinux.org/ ) sounds interesting. I may give it a try too. From what I've read, however, the Gentoo based versions are not as versatile (for adding hardware, etc.) as Ubuntu or other mainstream distros (it uses a unique core). It does have some interesting features though.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I agree that Ubuntu is a superb distro, but the only problem is that on BOTH of my AMD 64 desktops all I get is a black screen once I choose "install." One computer has an ATI card and the other nVidia. I get this same result with old and new versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with 64 bit and non 64 bit versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with installing to HD or liveCD of Ubuntu.


Ubuntu works great on my Pentium laptop, though.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris5977 /forum/post/0


Wow, I've never heard of Mythdora. I'll give it a shot. Thanks, Goofygrin!


and NewLinux


installing programs in Linux IS difficult if you have no idea where to even start. For example I don't have a clue what the following terms mean:


.deb

synaptic

adept

compile

source


Anyway, one of the reasons I'm doing this is because I wanted to learn my way around Linux. I'll figure it out.

I consider difficulty of doing something and not knowing how something is done to be two different things. If you didn't know what a .exe was or .msi in windows... You can compile source code in windows. That isn't specific to Linux. I think Linux exposes you more to what is going on. But really, you don't need to know all of those terms to install software, just as you don't need to know all the different ways in Windows.


My larger point was that not all Linux distros are the same with regards to installing. So saying installing in Linux is difficult sounded a little broad to me. In Ubuntu you can just click "Add/Remove" programs.


If wanted to use all of the open office programs in Windows I'd go the openoffice.org web site download it and install it. In Ubuntu I could use the "Add/Remove" programs, or just type at commandline:
Code:
Code:
sudo aptitude install openoffice.org
which is my preference. But I know everybody is different.


And hey, I mentioned mythdora
. Don't forget Knoppmyth.


Best wishes with your efforts to exploring Linux. Even if you don't stay with it it is good to know about other OSs and that you have a choice. Some of what i've learned in Linux applies to windows. I'm learning more about Macs these days.


good luck!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris5977 /forum/post/0


I agree that Ubuntu is a superb distro, but the only problem is that on BOTH of my AMD 64 desktops all I get is a black screen once I choose "install." One computer has an ATI card and the other nVidia. I get this same result with old and new versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with 64 bit and non 64 bit versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with installing to HD or liveCD of Ubuntu.


Ubuntu works great on my Pentium laptop, though.

Ubuntu is great, but it's not the end all and be all to distros. Unless you gotta have it, it's good to move on to something else.


That said, if you still want to try ubuntu, try installing of the alternate CD if you are having that problem.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris5977 /forum/post/0


I agree that Ubuntu is a superb distro, but the only problem is that on BOTH of my AMD 64 desktops all I get is a black screen once I choose "install." One computer has an ATI card and the other nVidia. I get this same result with old and new versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with 64 bit and non 64 bit versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with installing to HD or liveCD of Ubuntu.


Ubuntu works great on my Pentium laptop, though.

You didn't mention that in your original post. It sounds like your desktops have some kind of hardware incompatability (MB or video cards). Ubuntu does have some of those, if you check the Ubuntu docmentation pages. Since it works on your Pentium laptop, it sounds like your download was Ok.


At least you were able to find a distro that did work. Now you have to learn at least something about using the command line. That way you will be able to take full advantage of the versatiity of the GNU/Linux system (no pain, no gain). I guess that's an advantage us old-timers have - 30 yeas ago, that was the only way we could run things on PCs.


Without getting familiar with the command line usage, you won't be able to do any trouble-shooting, if and when, you do run into problems (even Windows XP and Vista still have a command line interface availability for that purpose).


The Sabayon (Gentoo based) distro should have some kind of GUI "Add/Remove" function like Ubuntu's. Like newlinux said, there should be some help from the Gentoo support documentation sites.


You also want to check out the stuff on the MythTV pages: http://www.mythtv.org/ . They should have some help for installing under Gentoo based versions.


BTW newlinux, isn't Mythdora based on the Fedora version, optimized for MythTV?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by newlinux /forum/post/0


Ubuntu is great, but it's not the end all and be all to distros. Unless you gotta have it, it's good to move on to something else.


That said, if you still want to try ubuntu, try installing of the alternate CD if you are having that problem.

Actually, believe it or not, I went from Red Hat to Mandrake/Mandriva to Gentoo and then to Ubuntu. There's no reason for me to move on to something else. Linux is Linux no matter what logo is on the cover, so it doesn't matter what distro you use -- they can all do the same stuff. Ubuntu just "feels" right - they are approaching (but, alas, haven't reached) UI nirvana.


The one thing that would make a perfect distro for me, though, is a developer base that will respond to bug reports and accept the fixes I submit.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by chris5977 /forum/post/0


I agree that Ubuntu is a superb distro, but the only problem is that on BOTH of my AMD 64 desktops all I get is a black screen once I choose "install." One computer has an ATI card and the other nVidia. I get this same result with old and new versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with 64 bit and non 64 bit versions of Ubuntu. I get this same result with installing to HD or liveCD of Ubuntu.


Ubuntu works great on my Pentium laptop, though.

Try changing some of the options in the bootup screen, such as resolution, or look for a way to use text mode. These are available using function keys and menu items from the initial boot screen that shows the Ubuntu logo and says "Start or Install Ubuntu" and a list of other options.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by CT_Wiebe /forum/post/0


BTW newlinux, isn't Mythdora based on the Fedora version, optimized for MythTV?

Yep, and KnoppMyth based on Knoppix, and Mythbuntu based Ubuntu.

Quote:
Originally Posted by nitrogen /forum/post/0


Actually, believe it or not, I went from Red Hat to Mandrake/Mandriva to Gentoo and then to Ubuntu. There's no reason for me to move on to something else. Linux is Linux no matter what logo is on the cover, so it doesn't matter what distro you use -- they can all do the same stuff. Ubuntu just "feels" right - they are approaching (but, alas, haven't reached) UI nirvana.


The one thing that would make a perfect distro for me, though, is a developer base that will respond to bug reports and accept the fixes I submit.

Yeah, I started off on Redhat a long while back. Then I didn't use Linux for a while, and I was choosing between Fedora, PCLinuxOS, and Ubuntu. Ended up with Ubuntu, for "the feel right" as well, and haven't had a reason to switch to another distro (except for one of my old laptops - which uses a minimal debian because i could easily install it over the Internet with a floppy).


There are some differences in how well different distros support hardware out of the box, so I was only suggesting he try another one if he didn't want to haggle with it. If it were me, I'd stick with Ubuntu and try a few different things to get it to work.
 

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 example of why my hatred for fedora knows no bounds . so what happens if you need to use an older server? sorry, you're SOL. and even if you're willing to downgrade for some reason, you'll find that their package archive for older distros is down with the message that no one is/was maintaining it and it has basically been abandoned.


and people will point to the fact that other distros are deprecating linuxthreads too, because NPTL is a better solution. and i will point to the fact that if i need to load up mysql3 or 4.0 to run with an old server, it'll work on freebsd via emulation but not on linux distros that deprecate things people might still need to use.
 

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I've run Sabayon for a while; it's a good distribution. Does some pre-configuring and packaging of Gentoo to make it friendlier out-of-the-box. I've run Gentoo for years, and also have Ubuntu on a desktop; I don't have a strong preference between the three. One advantage of Ubuntu is that it has a lot of momentum at the moment, so you'll find lots of other users to help and lots of software packages (like MythTV) will already be Ubuntu-friendly. That said, there's nothing wrong with Gentoo; it's certainly not night and day.


chris5977, you've probably already figured this out, but installing software in Gentoo is wickedly simple. Different than Windows, but actually easier. In Windows, you typically browse to a webpage that has a software program you want, download it, then double-click the downloaded file and follow the installer from there.

In Gentoo or Sabayon, you just open a terminal window (a command prompt) and type "emerge install programname". That's it -- it will download, compile, and install the program. Done.

Well, ok, there's a bit more to it. First of all, the program has to be something in the vast Gentoo online database. Many things are...to make sure your computer has the latest and greatest version of the online database of packages, run "emerge --sync" from a command line every day or two.

Then, of course, it can be tricky knowing exactly what to install. You can run "emerge --search someword" to search all the program names for some word. Or you can browse through all the packages located in "/usr/portage" ... there are, for example, a couple hundred programs in the media-video directory alone. It can be overwhelming.

And lastly, if the program doesn't exist in the Gentoo portage database, you can always download it and install it on its own. How to do this varies by program; you'll need to read the instructions that come with the program. Often it will involve the command line, but it depends.


Still, in the best case, it's easier than Windows. Have fun!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I know I'm going to sound like a Linux prostitute, but I found a distro that I think I like more than Sabayon.

http://www.pclinuxos.com/


PCLOS is designed to be absolutely as simple as possible. When I installed it, it automatically went to my monitor resolution and the sound worked right away--a Linux first for me.


I have figured out how to install stuff with it and got Google Earth running. Even though it is simple, I don't see that you lose any capabilities.
 
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