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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a Pardigm PW2200 subwoofer. One day when my wife was home alone. the subwoofer turn on by itself and scared the heck out of her when voices started to come out. The whole system incuding the tv was off. One day, I heard it and is sounded like a CB transmission. I have the woofer to set to automatic, so whenever the recevier is on, the subwoofer will kick on. Apparently, the CB radio transmission appears to be turning my subwoofer on then it transmits the message. Anyone else have an experience like this. This also happened to my regular computer pc speakers. Come to think of it, it also happend to my phone line as well. Very odd.
 

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Is your nieghbor a amateur ham radio guy? Look for a house nearby with antennas. Nowadays they can hide them in trees, as long wires between branches.


These kind of things can happen to anyone, my dad's brass bed used to pick up, and amplify AM radio! But the frequency you are experiencing this is unusual, and i would look for a closeby source. Or maybe you live by a major roadway?


If you do find a ham radio neighbor, talk to him about it, im not sure about the laws, but im pretty sure that you have a right to be relatively free from this kind of activity.


Most subwoofers are always on, but in sleep mode. Is this the case with yours? Or was it truely "off" ?
 

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That is strange indeed. Still, with well-shielded cables interference should not be a problem. Perhaps you need to find a better-shielded sub interconnect? How long is the cable too, longer cables can be more susceptible to this kind of thing. You don't have, say an extra-long poorly shielded cable with a lot of extra length that you've coiled up somewhere... this would be a recipie for this kind of signal noise.
 

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Ditto what the other folks said, it is almost certainly amateur radio VERY close to your house and better shielding should help.


However, assuming you have some legal protection (see note below), do try to get your neighbor to cough up the cash for the better cabling. Seeing that this happens in other products in your home, the threat of hundreds or even thousands of dollars of shielded cable may make your neighbor either reposition or lower the power of his radio setup. There is power in numbers, so perhaps you want to talk with other neighbors about approaching the radio operator as a group.


I don't think local or state governments can regulate radio transmissions, so you would likely need to seek FCC regulations to help your case. First step: is the neighbor's antenna registered/licensed? I think it needs to be.


Local groups *can* regulate radio antennas. For example, Home Owner Associations can regulate TV antennas, satellite dishes, etc. based on their physical appearance, not transmission characteristics.


Good luck. In the end, if you can minimize the impact you may just want to listen to Bobby McFarrin and "don't worry, be happy". :D



Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
THanks for the replies. I looked at my cable and it's about 20 feet in length, which is almost as twice as much as I need; it does say doulbe shielded though but I think it's a cheap brand called phoenix. Also, I walked around the neighborhood and sure enough my next door neighbor who is about 40 feet from my house has a HUGE antenna on the otherside of his house. I never noticed it before because it looks like a thin pole. My subwoofer in actually in sleep mode and turns on once in a while by itself. It's not a huge deal because this only happens maybe once or twice a month for about 5-10 minutes. If it gets worse, I'll talk to him. I though it was unusual how speakers could pick up receptions. Thanks for the info.
 

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You should probably just look at upgrading the cable. You can get pro cables online at bluejeans cable,or heartland cable or the like. They will be very well-shielded and great cables too. Or you could probably also go to radio shack and pick up some cables there that will have some better shielding. There's no immediate reason to be confrontational with your neighbor either, he may not realize you're having this problem, and hey, if he's a radio/electronics nut, he may well just have a bunch of well-shielded pro cables just lying around that you can use, you never know.


So i would try not leaving the extra cable rolled up in a coil, and buying a shorter cable (doesn't have to cost a whole lot of $$), and see if you can get rid of the interference.
 

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Also, some of the antenna effect of your cable may be a result of its length. If you can get away with a shorter one, then get a shorter one. I would build the shortest one I could with quad shielded RG6 cable. Look at parts express.
 

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I used to have a 15" 200 watt sub from Audio Source I got from Costco years ago, It was like $180 there. Well it would pick up the radio. Nothing else in my house would. I have an infinity BU-2 sub and it never did. The AS sub did, i took it back 3 times and got a new one from Costco all having the same problem. It was my opinion it was not shielded good enough, crappy subwoofer parts.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by JohnR_IN_LA


If you do find a ham radio neighbor, talk to him about it, im not sure about the laws, but im pretty sure that you have a right to be relatively free from this kind of activity.
Well the way the laws work on that, is if the HAM/CB radio operator is operating 100% legally, and with no flawed, overpowered or leaking equipment. He then has to do nothing to try and stop it from interfering with TV's radios or anything else.

And then it becomes the owners of the device that is receiving the interference "problem" to figure out how to stop it.

And if you make a complaint to the FCC about the guy, that is what they will likely tell you.


I am NOT saying in any way that is right, and the way it should be. Nor am I saying that it is wrong, and should be changed.

I am ONLY saying that's the way it is, and has been for a very long time. As I went through this with two different HAM operators, back in the 70's and 80's. My electric guitar even picked one of them up back then, as did one of my TV's and radio as well.
 

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I am a ham and routinely operate with close to a kilowatt in a residential neighborhood. If I was causing interference I would much rather try to work it out in a friendly manner rather than involve the FCC; try talking to the guy first.


Most hams will be more than happy to take a look and offer cheap/free remedies such as chokes on long cable runs. They don't want trouble just as you don't want trouble. Try listening to the interfering audio for a call sign -- hams must use them at least once every 10 minutes of operation. You can then lookup the callsign on www.qrz.com and get the name and address of the operator and stop by for a chat.


My coolest trick -- I can operate all the electronic gear in my house while transmitting at full power and notice "0" interference, including the phone. That is how I am prepared to handle any interference complaints -- if I don't cause problems with my own equipment, and I am the closest neighbor to my radio gear and antennas, then the problem almost certainly is in the installation or design of the susceptible equipment. I have a very short path to ground, and I use a low pass filter on the output of my amplifier.


Good luck with your RFI issues.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by Billped


Local groups *can* regulate radio antennas. For example, Home Owner Associations can regulate TV antennas, satellite dishes, etc. based on their physical appearance, not transmission characteristics.


Bill
There is a federal law that protects your right to put up a TV antenna, HOAs really cannot "regulate" them, except in extreme cases, like when they are 70 feet tall.


I do not know about other types of antennas though ....
 

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Don't listen to them!! It's really aliens!! They are plotting our takeover!!! :)

I have a friend that actually picks up that CB crap through his stereo speakers from some Civil war junkee that lives across the street from him. That damn guy bugged everyone in the neighborhood with that friggin thing.
 

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This reminds me of a spooky experience I once had.

I was sitting in the living room, when suddenly, from the far corner of the room, I heard what sounded like my name shouted then about 5 more words that trailed off in volume. There was no one else at home and nothing capable of producing sound in the room except the TV, near me - or so I thought.


I had a 17" computer monitor die on me, so I had taken it apart, exposing the tube, coils, etc, and set it on the little end-table in that corner.

As far as I can tell, without shielding, the coils around the tube caught a signal (CB I'm betting, since the main road is only about 30 feet from that room) and caused the picture tube to amplify it enough to scare the bejeezus out of me.


Then there was our neighbor's garage door that would sometimes open when an airplane went over... :)
 

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For what it's worth, unless the object of you're interference is approaching 100, and has huge black boxes with "Collins" plastered all over them, then your problem isn't with a Ham. Most hams run something called Single- Sideband, it makes their voices sound like Donald Duck with a head cold. Anyway, nearly every Ham is a real nice guy/girl who will go out of their way to make you happy, even if it isn't their fault.


If the voice sounds reasonably intelligible, if downright uncultured, then you have a CB'er who is up to no good. The best solution is to find a sympathetic Ham, and have him explain to you the Hows and whys of "Coax Pinning".


The FCC is unlikely to be of any help...


:)
 

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I had a similar problem with my neighbor and his CB radio. His voice was in the sub, VCR and cassette when it was recording. I finally had to talk to him and he lowered the power.


Using shielded interconnect may not help solve the interference since the amplifier and other circuit boards inside the sub are rarely enclosed in a metal box. The sub's wooden enclosure does not offer any shielding.


Rich
 

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Don't count the use sideband (SSB) modes, as being a Ham only thing!

As you can buy higher end CB sets, that have both upper (USB) and lower sideband (LSB) as well. And they are allowed to operate at slightly higher power output when operating on the sideband modes. As in sideband modes, they are allowed to use 12 watts of output power, while on the "normal" CB "band" they are only allowed to use 4 watts of output power.

Also many but not all hard core CB'ers. Have been known to ignore the output power rules. And often by hundreds of watts, over the legal 4 or 12 watts they are allowed to use.
 

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My PC speakers (one of those high-end $20 computer speaker systems :) picks up interference. But it doesn't sound like a ham operator or CB'er; based on the accents and the content (it's not very clear) I think it sounds like the BBC World Service.


As far as I know the BBC is not broadcast on any normal radio channel in these parts (Austin TX) so I am wondering if this is related to a short-wave broadcast. Is it possible that I have a neighbor tuning into the BBC on short-wave, and that is somehow producing interference?


It sounds ridiculous but it's the only theory I can come up with.


(My HT sub which is on the other side of the house does not pick this up, thankfully).
 
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