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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I hired an A/V firm to do some wiring throughout my home. For HDMI I specifically told them that I would provide the cables since they use Monster cables and I certainly didn't want to pay the premium for those cables.


I provided them with a bunch of Blue Jean Cables which they did use throughout the project. I'm guessing they must have needed more than I had given them as when I looked at the back of my rack I see that they did use a few Monster HDMI cables. They seemed to have used the Monster 500hd Standard speed cable:
http://www.monstercable.com/productdisplay.asp?pin=3833

mainly in a cat5e to HDMI balun.


These cables are basically used to send video from the rack to my basement TV and from receiving HDMI from my PS3 back to my rack.


I'm trying to decide if I should have them switch them for Blue Jean Cables. The issue is that those Monster cables seem to only support up to 1080i. My current TV is only 720p so it isn't a big deal now but in the future I'll probably update the TV or put in a projector which would be 1080p. I see these cables also are rated for 8bit color and I do have a blu-ray player in this mix.


Let me say again that I didn't pay for the Monster cables so the issue isn't that they charged me for something that I didn't want. I just need to decide if those cables are inferior and I should have them install better cables, or if the 1080i, 2.23Gbs rating is more about marketing.


Any thoughts would be appreciated.
 

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How long are the Monster cables?
 

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Irrelevant. At that short you should be fine. If ever you have issues, it's easy enough to replace them, but that would be pretty unlikely related to that cable, if anything it'd be the balun side cat side of things.

Quote:
The issue is that those Monster cables seem to only support up to 1080i. My current TV is only 720p so it isn't a big deal now but in the future I'll probably update the TV or put in a projector which would be 1080p. I see these cables also are rated for 8bit color and I do have a blu-ray player in this mix.

At that distance doing 1080p is probably no problem. I mean, it will be simple enough to try in the future. If it works at 1080p, then don't worry. If it doesn't work it will be obvious because it won't work. And then the troubleshooting fun begins...


If it works now, and you didn't pay for it per se, but as part of the whole deal, I'd not even waste the time navigating to a site to order different cables for no good reason.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
You say in the future it would be obvious to tell if it didn't work. Would it be something like pressing info on the TV and I'd see 1080i rather than 1080p for a 1080p source?
 

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No. It would be obvious in that you would have: no picture at all, snow, flashing lines, partial snow, sparklies, or otherwise obvious errors in the image. Usually though it's all snow or no picture at all. HDMI is kind of all or nothing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles /forum/post/15553199


No. It would be obvious in that you would have: no picture at all, snow, flashing lines, partial snow, sparklies, or otherwise obvious errors in the image. Usually though it's all snow or no picture at all. HDMI is kind of all or nothing.

That doesn't make much sense to me. Are you saying that if I have a 1080p television hooked up to a BD-player with a 1080p disc and am using a cable that theoretically can't pass 1080p (but can pass 1080i) than I won't get a picture? Why would a 720p/1080i set get a picture but a 1080p set wouldn't if the latter set can display 720p or 1080i?


I know I've also read that cables can pass 1080p up to x feet and 720p/1080i up to y feet. I really can't believe that a lower quality set would get a picture but a higher quality set wouldn't.


That all being said you certainly are far more knowledgeable than me on the topic so if that is what you are saying I certainly believe you, but my guess is I'm misinterpreting your answer.


Thanks for the help.


P.S. Let me also ask the question in another way. Monster Cable is the king of marketing so why would they market a cable as 720p/1080i rather than 1080p if a short cable shouldn't have any problem playing 1080p material?
 

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That doesn't make much sense to me. Are you saying that if I have a 1080p television hooked up to a BD-player with a 1080p disc and am using a cable that theoretically can't pass 1080p (but can pass 1080i) than I won't get a picture? Why would a 720p/1080i set get a picture but a 1080p set wouldn't if the latter set can display 720p or 1080i?

If the cable doesn't have the bandwidth and is failing at 1080p60, then if you send a signal with lower bandwidth, depending on what the cable can do and where the failure cliff is, then yes if you drop the bandwidth requirements by say sending 1080p24 or 720p60, or 1080i60, yes you could have an image just fine at lower clock speeds, but not higher ones. But again, this mainly occurs at longer distances.

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I know I've also read that cables can pass 1080p up to x feet and 720p/1080i up to y feet. I really can't believe that a lower quality set would get a picture but a higher quality set wouldn't.

What do you mean by "set"? I don't understand your statement here.


If you mean TV set, and not getting a 1080p signal as far as a 1080i or 720p signal, again, it goes back to the fact that the bandwidth requirements for 1080p60 is way higher, thus the difficulty of getting those signals down a cable become a lot more difficult. This doesn't have anything to do with whether you bought a 1080p tv or a 720p TV. It just has to do with the difficulties of getting signals from one place to another. If you have a 1080p TV, and are trying to send 1080p over distance, you may find that dropping to 1080i output from the source makes everything work just dandy. Again, because the bandwidth requirement for 1080i is half that for 1080p, so you can go a lot farther with that signal given the same cabling characteristics.

Quote:
P.S. Let me also ask the question in another way. Monster Cable is the king of marketing so why would they market a cable as 720p/1080i rather than 1080p if a short cable shouldn't have any problem playing 1080p material?

I have no idea what their motivations are. However my hunch is that they probably sell more expensive cables and will slap 1080p logos on those and try to convince you that you need those cables to get the best picture quality, or the like, and thus they upsell you on more expensive widgets, make more money, and keep the economy afloat on the backs of suckers, aka consumers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChrisWiggles /forum/post/15557200


If the cable doesn't have the bandwidth and is failing at 1080p60, then if you send a signal with lower bandwidth, depending on what the cable can do and where the failure cliff is, then yes if you drop the bandwidth requirements by say sending 1080p24 or 720p60, or 1080i60, yes you could have an image just fine at lower clock speeds, but not higher ones. But again, this mainly occurs at longer distances.




What do you mean by "set"? I don't understand your statement here.


If you mean TV set, and not getting a 1080p signal as far as a 1080i or 720p signal, again, it goes back to the fact that the bandwidth requirements for 1080p60 is way higher, thus the difficulty of getting those signals down a cable become a lot more difficult. This doesn't have anything to do with whether you bought a 1080p tv or a 720p TV. It just has to do with the difficulties of getting signals from one place to another. If you have a 1080p TV, and are trying to send 1080p over distance, you may find that dropping to 1080i output from the source makes everything work just dandy. Again, because the bandwidth requirement for 1080i is half that for 1080p, so you can go a lot farther with that signal given the same cabling characteristics.




I have no idea what their motivations are. However my hunch is that they probably sell more expensive cables and will slap 1080p logos on those and try to convince you that you need those cables to get the best picture quality, or the like, and thus they upsell you on more expensive widgets, make more money, and keep the economy afloat on the backs of suckers, aka consumers.

I think I understand now and thanks for the explanation. From what I'm reading, the way to test out if the cable can pass 1080p is by forcing the TV to output it rather than having it set to auto. If it is set to auto and 1080p fails than it will probably revert to 1080i or 720p, but if you force the tv to output 1080p60 or 24 and the cable fails than you get the sparkles or no picture as you describe.


And you were correct in earlier my term "set" did mean TV set.


Thanks again.
 
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