AVS Forum banner

1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
26 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·

So I'm very happy with my Samsung PN51F5300 (my first HDTV, actually).

I have all of the "artificial" settings turned off (like the ones that would be on in "Dynamic" mode).

 

Obviously I want accurate colour for watching Blu-rays and such. I've read about how Dynamic Contrast and "Native" Color Space (instead of Auto) actually ruin details and all that. But when I look at, say, the main screen of Disney's WOW disc, and change the Color Space to "Native", the colours really do look... better. The grassy hills looks green and the sky looks like a rich blue. Is this simply because I'm seeing them side by side? Going back to Auto, it looks washed out and almost more yellowy than green. But if that's how the actual source is, then I guess I'd want it to be as it's meant to be. Same for Dynamic Contrast: it seems to bring out shadows and make everything look better, and when I turn it "Off" the blacks seem woefully light and detail-less. I've been told it's artificial and really makes blacks/whites lose detail, though.

 

The Colour temp of "Warm2" also trips me up a little. Why would I find "Warm1" and "Standard" (aka a cooler setting) more pleasing when viewed back to back? What is it about those that make me like them? Is it from being used to an LCD computer monitor and a phone screen?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,003 Posts
sometimes(often) you need to change some settings to make the warm2 setting correct. I have my f8500 set to warm1 right now because I haven't gotten around to messing with the CMS yet, and warm2 is very green. basically it's the lesser of two evils. what I thought was interesting was that the warm1 setting on my f8500 looks almost identical to the warm2 setting of my b530 that it replaced. so MAYBE warm2 isn't the only good option this year? I feel like I've seen several others use the warm1 setting


as for the color space, I don't know the specific names, but it basically comes down to using the right one for your source. if you use a wider color space than the source, you end up with some funky looking faces and oversaturated colors. it often looks 'better' until you know what it's supposed to look like. I usually call up an image with ppl in it when I'm trying to figure out what the correct setting is. the wrong setting will make faces look too red or too pale.


dynamic contrast you absolutely want to turn off. it's not showing more details, it's actually crushing those details. you really need to make sure you have your brightness and contrast set correctly before you compare. if 'black' looks washed out it's because it's not being displayed as 'black'. the fix is to calibrate your brightness, not to enable dynamic contrast. if we look at the numbers, 'black' is a value of 16, dynamic contrast basically adjusts that based on what's being displayed. in a brighter scene, it might be showing everything up to 20 as 'black', meaning any of the shadow detail between 16 and 20 will be lost. now, I'm totally pulling that higher number out of thin air, it could be even worse. the point is, dynamic contrast is a bad thing, it crushing blacks, and hides detail in the shadows. it can look more appealing because it gives the impression of more contrast, but proper calibration and a good source is far better
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,720 Posts
i would suggest curtpalme.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3532 2 its a calibration website i learn from it and i believe you will too. it will explain why the colors and grass and the low down on gamma and grayscale and what they mean.


google CHROMAPURE GRAYSCALE & COLOR CALIBRATION FOR DUMMIES
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top