AVS Forum banner
1 - 3 of 3 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
352 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have been told by many people, that there are no discernible differences between two identical sub setups, one being in a common chamber design, at "x" number of cubes, and the other, using the same subs in a separate chamber design with each chamber being half the volume of the common chamber variety. But modeling each variety does indeed show a huge change in the response, group delay, total Q, impedance phasing, amplifier loads, etc. Even port tuning and velocities have huge variations between the two, which is no shocker there to me, since ports are dependent on the box volumes to work correctly.


So what is the real deal here? I would really like to know your input on the matter, if you have any. Let the free for all begin! Also, which design type do you like more, and why?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
15,491 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by s_carter /forum/post/19633388


So I have been told by many people, that there are no discernible differences between two identical sub setups, one being in a common chamber design, at "x" number of cubes, and the other, using the same subs in a separate chamber design with each chamber being half the volume of the common chamber variety. But modeling each variety does indeed show a huge change in the response, group delay, total Q, impedance phasing, amplifier loads, etc. Even port tuning and velocities have huge variations between the two, which is no shocker there to me, since ports are dependent on the box volumes to work correctly.

If you're getting those results then something is off with your modeling. Way off. The only major difference between the two topologies is the potential for standing wave development if using a single chamber allows sufficiently long internal dimensions.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,344 Posts
I agree with Bill with regard to enclosure modelling of single/dual units as described, but two separate subs in different locations (same tuning etc) may yield better results in terms of balance an uniformity.
 
1 - 3 of 3 Posts
Top