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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am quite interested in this light for my TV lighting/viewing. Could anyone provide me with some feedback on whether or not it is worth it ??? How bright is it ? Does it actually enhance colors and blacks ?


Also, there seem to be a few different models of lights on their site, I am interested mainly in the basic one vs. the Pro one. One is $55 and the other is $160. Is there that big of a difference between the two ???


How is the life span on these bulbs/lights ???
 

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I just received my Ideal-Lume about a week ago & am very happy with it. I bought the base model + a filter kit. I'm glad I bought the filters because the light would be too bright otherwise.

I do think it also improved the picture & my wife thinks so too. When I told her that I was buying the bias light, she was skeptical. She's now a believer.

As far as the life of the bulb, it's listed on their site. It seems like it said 20,000 hours or so.


Jeff
 

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I currently own one of the originals with another original being shipped as we speak. I have used the bias light with my 36" direct view HDTV for over a year. I think they are great. I'm not certain if they really help in terms of the color thing, but they DEFINITELY help in terms of scenes that transition from dark to light and freak my eyes out. I wear contact lenses alot, so the eye freaking out thing bugs the heck out of me. I just ordered a new light to go behind my 61" DLP in the theater. Well worth the money to me. I will most likely start using the filter kit with the downstairs 36" since I have off-****e walls down there. My theater walls, however, are colormatched to Kodak grey, so no need for filters on that bias light.


All in all... a great $60 spent per light or so.


Later,

Jeff
 

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I have the basic model and I like it a lot. It makes it very easy on the eyes to watch TV in the (almost) dark. It doesn't get very hot, which is nice since it's so close to my TV and A/V cables. The only thing I don't like is having to reach behind the TV to turn it on, but for $55 I can deal with that.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by DLiquid
I have the basic model and I like it a lot. It makes it very easy on the eyes to watch TV in the (almost) dark. It doesn't get very hot, which is nice since it's so close to my TV and A/V cables. The only thing I don't like is having to reach behind the TV to turn it on, but for $55 I can deal with that.
DLiquid,


Not sure if you caught my thread on this very topic (reaching back and turning it on and off), but some kind souls had some good advice for me and I placed the order for two items that should help me get around this very issue. Check out this thread for more info:

http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showt...hreadid=251865


I haven't received the wall socket and X10 controller yet, but once I do and get them installed I will post and let you know how difficult it was to getting it to work.


Oops, one thing I forgot to ask... are you using some sort of universal IR remote (Pronto, MX-500, MX-700)? If so, you can download all the X10 discrete codes as I plan to do and control it via the info in the above thread.


Let me know if you have other questions.


Good luck,

Jeff
 

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Jeff, that's pretty cool, thanks for the tip. I have a universal remote but it's a $60 Sony one with no "downloading" functionality. I'd have to buy an X10 remote and then "teach" my universal remote the commands. I might just have to do this at some point. :)
 

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I recently had a thread about backlights (more in general, not just the Ideal-Lume). For those interested it's here .


-Rob-
 

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Great thread Rob. However, I'm too lazy to run all over finding the fixtures, when I can order it over the internet.


I was wondering what the difference was between the original ideal-lume and the Pro and Plasma which are $100 more. The latter two provide the filters, instant light-up and six inches longer bulb, but for $100 more? You could buy two of the orignials with filters and have some left over.


Lastly, I have 60" GWII so I wonder if the 18" is long enough?


Thanks,


Mike
 

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I have the original 18" Ideal-Lume behind my 57" Hitachi and it is more than enough. Make sure you get the filter kit. I am using both the 1 and 2 f-stop filters for a total of 3 f-stops. Carefully check the back of your television for any openings that might allow light to enter and avoid those areas when placing your ideal-lume.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I would still love to hear if it REALLY enhances the viewing experience and REALLY does enhance colors and blacks to where I am going to say 'WOW!'.


Anyone ???
 

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No one can really tell you that it's going to blow you away, because we haven't seen what the lighting situation is in your room. But I can tell you this: I was impressed. I already had a cheap-o GE fluorescent behind my set, so I only bought the bulb and filter kit from Idealume. Having the proper amount and color temperature of backlighting definitely helps with eyestrain and perception of color.
 

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Quote:
Originally posted by mlouie
I was wondering what the difference was between the original ideal-lume and the Pro and Plasma which are $100 more. The latter two provide the filters, instant light-up and six inches longer bulb, but for $100 more? You could buy two of the orignials with filters and have some left over.
For what it's worth, I've been told that the original model actually measures closer to 6500 K than the Pro version does.
 

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MDRiggs,


I am curious where you heard that the standard Ideal-Lume bias light is more accurate than the Pro model. Perhaps someone based that opinion on the CRI ratings of the respective bulbs used. This is a common missunderstanding.


Color Rendering Index (CRI) ratings are a rough average and not as precise as Spectral Power Distribution (SPD) measurements. Some manufacturers play fast and loose with CRI ratings as well. CRI is used to rate illuminants because it is a simple number on a scale of 1 to 100. SPD measurements require a complex set of numbers referenced to a graph or a pictorial representation of the spectral graph. This is seldom used, due to its more cumbersome nature that requires more technical explanation to decifer.


We asked GretagMacbeth to measure their bulb in our fixture to verify that the bulb/fixture interface did not compromise the spectral performance of their patented, reference-grade fluorescent. The characteristics of a fluorescent fixture can have an effect upon how efficiently the phosphors are illuminated. GretagMacbeth is a world-class expert in the field of reference color products and services. They are monitored closely and regularly by multiple standards organizations for accuracy and consistency, a traceable NIST laboratory, with both ISO 17025 and ISO 2001 certifications.


They sent us a bitmap file copy of the spectrograph. Anyone who wants a copy can send me an e-mail requesting the file attachment. The results were essentially: Correlated Color Temperature= 6476 Kelvins; CIE 1931 chromaticity coordinates= [email protected] and [email protected] The x/y coordinates for D65 are 0.3127 and 0.3291 respectively.


When calibrating broadcast monitors, the practical tolerance of deviation from the ideal allowed in the professional video arena is +/- .004 from absolute D65. The measured sample of the Ideal-Lume Pro we sent them only deviates by +.0018 along the x axis and -.0012 along the y axis! The GretagMacbeth bulb we use has a 7-phosphor mix and the best Spectral Power Distribution of any 6500K fluorescent available.


Their measurement method was to read the bulb directly with a calibrated spectroradiometer, while it sat in one of their industry-standard color viewing booths, with a neutral gray surround of Munsell N8. They also measured our standard Ideal-Lume, which uses a 4-phosphor Lumiram 6500K bulb, in a less efficient fixture, with a magnetic ballast. CCT came in at 6044K. The x/y coordinates deviated from D65 by +.0080 along the x axis and +.0084 along the y axis. With 4 phosphors, its SPD is inferior to the bulb we use in the Pro.


The smallest 6500K bulb that GM makes is the one we use in the Pro. Our orginal bulb was the Lumiram, chosen by reason of their stated CRI, the small size and lower cost. Lumiram's bulb may perform better in a fixture with an electronic ballast but we have yet to test that. It's still going to be limited in its SPD with only 4 phosphors.


Best regards and beautiful pictures,

G. Alan Brown, President

CinemaQuest, Inc.
www.cinemaquestinc.com


Insist on HDTV! :eek:
 

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Can someone please PM me the site where they sell these?


Thanks :)
 

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Isn't the color of the wall behind your TV an important consideration on whether a light will help or hinder your viewing pleasure? I've been in living rooms with interesting wallpaper designs .
 

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Dale001,


This info from the plasma section of the forum should answer your question about wall color and wall paper.


"If the wall is colored other than neutral, then the technically correct spectral performance of the expensive bulbs used in Ideal-Lume bias lights would be compromised. Ideal-Lume viewing environment products are for folks who want the utmost performance from their typically substantial hardware and software investment. Display calibration is also compromised when the viewing environment conditions surrounding the display are not correct.


The benefits of correct viewing environment conditions are thoroughly researched, well-documented and habitually incorporated in professional video environments and facilities. The Society of Motion Picture and Television Engineers quantified the ideal viewing environment conditions for optimum video program analysis and extended viewing comfort decades ago. These principles are not costly to implement but frequently overlooked in the consumer realm.


A simple way to achieve correct wall color is to take a reference color sample to Home Depot or any paint/fabric store that uses computerized color matching equipment. SMPTE's reference was the Munsell Color Order System. CinemaQuest, Inc. offers Munsell Neutral Value Scale fan decks as well, for reference. A Kodak 18% gray card can be used at about half the cost but only provides one shade of gray, equivalent to a Munsell value of N5. The whole room need not be neutral, just the area surrounding the display, within the field of view of the observer. Other shades of neutral, from black to white, can be incorporated into the scheme to add variation and interest.


Varied patterns, depth and texture can also be used to accommodate and complement the design scape in the rest of the room. These additional elements actually contribute to relief of viewer fatigue to boot. SMPTE's human factors research acknowledged that people habitually shift their focus periodically from the dominant point of interest. Providing another focal plane behind the screen surface allows the eye's focusing mechanisms to change once in a while. This helps with eye comfort similar to getting up to stretch after sitting in one spot for an extended period of time. Another aid to viewing fatigue is to provide an element of interest for the eyes to zero in on more readily as part of that varied focal plane. A wall paper pattern and/or objects hanging on the wall are often desirable for this effect. These items would still need to be a neutral color.


Providing a neutral surround within the field of view of the screen dramatically improves natural color perception. People who have incorporated these principles are delighted with much how much more vivid and life-like their TV images become.


This is not unique or original stuff, just common sense, once one takes the time to think it through. I first became aware of these principles while studying the booklet that originally came with Joe Kane's precedent-setting laserdisc 'A Video Standard' back in the early '90s. Mr. Kane was asked to serve as chairman of the SMPTE professional monitor working group that conducted the human factors analysis back in the mid '80s. The rewards are substantial when these principles are implemented.


Much is being discussed these days in the home theater community about the importance of proper room acoustics. Poor acoustics can seriously compromise the performance of even the most expensive audio gear. Viewing environment conditions have every bit as great an affect upon video display performance. We all focus so much concern toward where our dollars go when evaluating what equipment we spend our hard-earned money for. Acoustic considerations and viewing environment conditions simply allow us to get the most from what we have spent on our hardware, music and video collections."


Best regards and beautiful pictures,

G. Alan Brown, President

CinemaQuest, Inc.


Insist on HDTV!:eek:
 
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