AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
126 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i dont ever buy movies, but if there was one blu-ray i should buy for calibrating and testing LCD tv's, comparing picture quality etc.. whats the one to get?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
117 Posts
kingdom of heaven is a good test disc, and can be found pretty inexpensively, and its the directors cut, which turns it from a mediocre movie to a pretty good one
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,216 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by cut /forum/post/18286199


i dont ever buy movies, but if there was one blu-ray i should buy for calibrating and testing LCD tv's, comparing picture quality etc.. whats the one to get?

I use this:

http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Video-...8253228&sr=8-1


It has all the test patterns you need for a really good DIY calibration without expensive tools. Plus it has a series of very good demo material (Space shuttle lift off, people with various skin tones, scenes shot in different lighting both brighness and contrast, wild color bursts, etc.). It's all in 1080p/24 with DD True HD (I think. But it is definitely lossless audio). Well worth the price.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,233 Posts
If your testing Shadow Details and Blacks I highly recommend Van Helsing in HD (has a variety of B/W and dark scenes and special effects and vibrant color and hot vampiress's where those details will either shine and make you go WoW or nothing at all. On a large HT panel it can be very immersive - if the Shadow Details suck there'll be no immersion though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,739 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluesky636 /forum/post/18287147


I use this:

http://www.amazon.com/Digital-Video-...8253228&sr=8-1


It has all the test patterns you need for a really good DIY calibration without expensive tools. Plus it has a series of very good demo material (Space shuttle lift off, people with various skin tones, scenes shot in different lighting both brighness and contrast, wild color bursts, etc.). It's all in 1080p/24 with DD True HD (I think. But it is definitely lossless audio). Well worth the price.

you can get the same results by eye


i have the dvd and hd dvd versions and i'll be damned if i get the blu-ray ver
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,216 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by dm145 /forum/post/18294606


you can get the same results by eye


i have the dvd and hd dvd versions and i'll be damned if i get the blu-ray ver

Really? You can set brightness, contrast, color,sharpness, gamma, etc. by eye using (I assume) program material? You must have really good eyes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,307 Posts
^^^


Some of us who have experience with the color sets of the 60s, which pretty much had to be adjusted every time one changed channels and had knobs on the set instead of buttons on a remote (actually no remote at all) can do a pretty decent job "by eye", having learned by experience just what each control does and gotten plenty of practice back in the days of NTSC (Never Twice the Same Color) tv.


I've used calibration discs in the past and highly recommend them to people with little experience in adjusting all those mysterious controls on their sets. In my case I've found that the settings derived from the calibration discs were all very close to what I'd already set by eye.


Keep in mind though that I've been adjusting tvs since the mid-50's when I was my parent's "remote control" at the age of 5.


For those who are just delving into the art/science of getting the right settings on their tvs I think a calibration disc is a must. Too many movies these days have had some kind of color manipulation done to achieve a certain artistic effect to be useful as reference material for precise settings. A calibration disc provides a reliable baseline to aim for. Once the settings are set to this baseline any anomalies in color tone, contrast, grain, etc. found in normal viewing material can be assumed to be source related rather than a problem with the tv. The current ATSC broadcast standard and the standards adhered to by most dvd and BD production facilities are far more stable than the old NTSC system, such variations as do appear are usually intentional on the part of the producer of the content and constant adjustment of the tv should be unnecessary and avoided. In other words, CSI Vegas and CSI Miami look completely different but they're supposed to so leave the tv alone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,216 Posts

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve S /forum/post/18294931


^^^


Some of us who have experience with the color sets of the 60s, which pretty much had to be adjusted every time one changed channels and had knobs on the set instead of buttons on a remote (actually no remote at all) can do a pretty decent job "by eye", having learned by experience just what each control does and gotten plenty of practice back in the days of NTSC (Never Twice the Same Color) tv.


I've used calibration discs in the past and highly recommend them to people with little experience in adjusting all those mysterious controls on their sets. In my case I've found that the settings derived from the calibration discs were all very close to what I'd already set by eye.


Keep in mind though that I've been adjusting tvs since the mid-50's when I was my parent's "remote control" at the age of 5.


For those who are just delving into the art/science of getting the right settings on their tvs I think a calibration disc is a must. Too many movies these days have had some kind of color manipulation done to achieve a certain artistic effect to be useful as reference material for precise settings. A calibration disc provides a reliable baseline to aim for. Once the settings are set to this baseline any anomalies in color tone, contrast, grain, etc. found in normal viewing material can be assumed to be source related rather than a problem with the tv. The current ATSC broadcast standard and the standards adhered to by most dvd and BD production facilities are far more stable than the old NTSC system, such variations as do appear are usually intentional on the part of the producer of the content and constant adjustment of the tv should be unnecessary and avoided. In other words, CSI Vegas and CSI Miami look completely different but they're supposed to so leave the tv alone.

I know what you mean. I used to calibrate our B&W tvs by eye all the time.



The big advantage to using a calibration disc now, is that depending on the tv, so many more controls are available at the user level so you don't have to go into the service menu. My Sony KDL-40S410 has color, tint, brightness, contrast, and sharpness, and color temp at the user level. My Sony KDL-46S5100 adds gamma, and white balance (both gain and drive for gray scale calibration). Those are all very useful adjustments. Most of the other "features" on tvs are useless if it is properly calibrated.


There was a show on last year (I can't remember the name but it was about a SWAT team and was pretty good) that was green! Every other show on every other channel was perfect except this show was green. Ugh!
 

·
Moderator
Joined
·
23,032 Posts
Please see the BD disc forum Tier stickies and the Display Calibration forum here. Thanks.


larry
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top