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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have ceiling speakers throughout my house installed by the previous owners. In my media room I have 4 speaker terminals for these. I was planning on either powering these speakers with the Zone 2 outs on my Denon 2310CI or getting an Onkyo M-282. Either way I only have two channels rated for a min of 6 ohms. Assuming each speaker terminal represents a standard 8 ohm load (I'm not exactly sure, but it was professionally installed for someone who was not an audiophile so that seems like a safe bet) then connecting 2 to each channel would bring it down to 4 ohm (at least as I understand it).


Would this really cause a problem? I know the amp manufactures caution you against it, but I know that is what the last owner did. If I don't drive the amp too hard would it really be an issue? In this case I am less concerned about sound quality than I am about burning out an amp.
 

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It definately can. Amp sections in receivers are usually not too robust. They could definately go into protection. Another thing to consider is the 4 ohm figure would be a nominal figure. The impedance can drop below 4 ohms on occasion; that would definately be bad. If you have good access to the speakers, I would rewire them in series instead of parallel. This would produce a comfy load to the receiver.


Regards,

Brian
 

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The first thing I would do is check each pair of red/black terminals with DVM and confirm the impedance.


If it is 4 ohms, personally I would get an amp rated down to 4 ohms. You can pick up the Behringer A500 for $200 and it is rated for stereo use at 4 ohms. It is also rated for more power than the Onkyo.


The only thing missing would be the auto on/off feature, but that is easily overcome with a smart strip .


In the end, it is up to you whether or not you want to take a chance on the amp dying.


You could also rewire them to get a better load for the amp.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
wow, that looks like a great amp for the price!! Auto on/off is a big issue actually because I want the system to be able to be turn on from another room. The smart strip would work, but because I am using a multi zone receiver it would turn on the amp anytime the receiver is on, not just when the 2nd zone is on. Maybe that isn't so bad, but it is a little wasteful. I do have a 12v trigger on my AVR, is there a way I could use that?
 

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In order to utilize the 12v trigger on the 2310, the amp would also need a 12v trigger which AFAIK, the A500 does not have one. If you wanted to go that route, you would need to find either a smart strip with a 12v trigger or a 12v trigger outlet like this .


As the A500 apparently only tests out at 120W real world, you might want to also consider the Emotiva UPA-2 which has a 12v trigger built in.
 

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A 4 ohm load may not be too much for your AVR or that Onkyo amplifier IF you only plan on using those speakers for some background music.


If you start cranking it up you may have problems.
 

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can you use a 6 ohm speaker for mains while the rest of the speakers are 8 ohms? receiver is a Pio VSX 03.. good topic ..looking at these for new mains: http://store.emptek.com/e55ti.php
 

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A well behaved 6 ohm speaker should be ok with most receivers. If it's not shutting down due to overheating, you are probably ok.


8 ohms is best, IMO, because that's what most receivers are designed for. They may include a 6 ohm switch, which will limit power, which is not ideal. In other words, if you have to use the switch to ensure the receiver does not overload (shut down due to over current or overheating,) you are not operating optimally, IMO.


Which seems to indicate, to me anyway, why mess with 6 ohm speakers or lower at all? Use 8 ohm speakers if at all possible or go buy some amps.


I know some people run five or more 4 ohm speakers connected to receivers, and seem to get away with it (some receivers seem to be designed for this, many aren't.) And I have seen a number of posts about people blowing up their receiver by overloading it; yes, it should shut down first, but power transistors can fail first, and AVRs are not cheap to repair.


And some people seem to willfully ignore proper ventilation. Thos people should not even be using 8 ohm speakers. Maybe 16 ohm speakers are better for them
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If anyone wondered how this turned out I connected a DMM to the speaker outlets and found that they are each 3 ohm. Kind of a shock considering this was professionally installed, it seems like there would have been a better way to wire it. I wired the two lefts in a series and the two rights the same way, making each 6 ohm and plugged that into my AVR.
 
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