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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The house I live in is not that old, but there are not too many separate electrical circuits in my house. The circuit to my room has the following devices connected to it across 2 different outlets:


- Computer System (300W)

- Computer Speakers (50 watt RMS)

- 17" CRT Monitor

- Printer

- Scanner

- Cordless Phone

- 100W Lamp

- Alcoholic's Fridge (about 3 cubic ft)

- Panasonic CT32HX41 HDTV

- Kenwood VR-309 500W A/V Receiver

- VCR

- Playstation

- Playstation 2

- Ceiling Fan (directly wired)


Now I rarely have everything above turned on simultaneously, but I do have my computer running during the day, and I commonly use the TV, A/V Receiver and VCR along with the fridge coming on and off periodically. The fan is on most of the time too.


I've never tripped the circuit breaker, so I figure that the load being put on the circuit is not too excessive. But I am almost positive that the voltage getting to any of the devices is much less than 120V.


I was thinking about getting a UPS (uninterruptable power supply) device with a voltage regulator, and connecting my home theater stuff to that. I also recall reading something about a device that "cleans" the power, which results in better sounding sound and a TV picture with more 'depth'. The thing cost like $2000, so it is too expensive for me. Will the UPS provide similar results? I'd like to hear some insights about electricity here. And what is a good UPS.


-= SsZERO =-
 

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Have you measured the voltage coming from one of the outlets? Having more things on a circuit doesn't mean the voltage to each device is less.


Spend a few bucks and buy a meter. Than you can decide if you really have a problem and you'll know what you really need to "fix" (if anything).
 

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Most electronics devices are converting the AC back to DC before use. I really doubt ( besides placebo or finiky hardware ) a voltage cleaner/regulator would make $2k worth of diffrence.


You are best off putting the most $$ equipment on HQ surge supressors or HQ UPS's ( some UPS's even do voltage regulation for you ). Just remeber that if you do use a UPS A/V equipment can very easly overpower them. Now this is more for thier protection than anything else.


Go to radioshack and get a good volt meter. Check an outlet, it should be 120 +- 5. You should do some tests with some of the most high drain devices turned off ( reciever, tv, lamp, computer ) to see if it makes a diffrence. There should be no diffrence in AC voltage based on what on unless there is s problem. If there is don't attempt to fix it yourself, get a professional to come in and look things over first.


Another cheap solution is to use a device that you can pick up at most home improvement stores to improve the effecincies of your fridge. It does something to the power comming in so that the compressor kicks on in a cleaner fashon.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Well, the reason I am worried about the line voltage is because when I turn on my TV or A/V receiver, my lamp dims for a second or so. Putting a UPS there should allow the excessive drain to be put on the inline battery, which would prevent the momentary voltage dip across the rest of the circuit. Is this even a problem??


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Most UPS's do not operate off of the battery UNLESS the power goes out. They can sense 1/500'th of a secound outage and kick right in, so no they would not help you in that case.


The voltage is not getting drained it's the amps that are getting drained. It's not uncommon for large appliances to have a very large startup cost. During normal opperation this is greatly reduced.
 

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When you turn on your receiver and/or TV, they are both charging up a bunch of capacitors. If you are not playing at loud volumes, you probably won't see tha much current draw again (or else you would notice the lights dimming in time to music).


The only thing in your setup I would worry about is the refrigerator coming on while using the receiver, as that is likely to put noise into your system. As snowmoon says, I don't think spending $ on a UPS is the solution you want. Use the money to have an electrician run another circuit to your room instead.


Or have I misinterpreted your post? Rereading, are you worried the voltage drop on powerup might be bad for your computer or receiver/TV? If so, add a circtui is still a better way to go.


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