AVS Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 25 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As i learn all about the subject, and shop around at all the new products, this question seems to be popping up more and more, along with a few others ill throw in


The newer HDTV sets like the Panasonic PT-52DL10 ( http://www.prodcat.panasonic.com/sho...=True&active=1 )


The Mitsubishi WD-65000 ( http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/dlp2.htm )


and the Hitachi 55DMX01 W are all "DLP"


After spending some time reading at various forums here trying to learn all this caca, i thought this pertained to projectors, not rear projection. Is this an important feature i should consider waiting for ( and in waiting for i mean right now they are very high priced, but have managed to drive down the price of the other product lines of the companies) One of the most important features ill be waiting to use in this new set will be not only movies, but use with HTPC. Also it seems coincidental that these are the only sets yet that are 780p as well as 1080i, and progressive scan (or was that my imagination)


If the enhancement is only semi noteworthy, ill take the significant price decrease these new ones have forced older models into. But if the performance and abilities are of serious difference, then ill consider paying the price, at least after waiting a little while for them to be reasonable. Any help trying to gauge this would be greatly appreciated.



------------------

Rama

"He who (BLEEPS) nuns, will later join the church "c> - Joe Strummer, The Clash
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Keep in mind that, in a relatively simplified sense, a rear-projection television is just a folded-up front-projection system. So, technologies that can apply to front projection may have application in rear projection. DLP is one of those.


DLP ("Digital Light Processing") refers to the Texas Instruments technology of using a "Digital Micromirror Device" with associated components to replace the CRT "guns" ususally used in rear-projection televisions (RPTVs).


If you look at a typical RPTV, you'll find three large-ish cathode ray tubes, one for each of the primary colors (red, green, blue). These tubes each display one component of the image, and the light emitted is focused through some optics onto a large mirror, which then reflects the projected beam onto the back surface of the screen, displaying a full-color image.


CRTs have advantages and disadvantages. Most of the advantages of CRTs have to do with their being a very mature technology -- they've been around for decades, and have had lots of refinement. A good CRT RPTV can have a very sharp, bright picture with excellent contrast and color rendition. They tend to be very adjustable and "tweakable".


The disadvantages of CRTs mostly have to do with their being high-power analog devices, and with the need to use three of them to project color. Because they're analog devices where electronics control the sweep of an electron beam across a phosphor face, it's possible for the electronics to "drift" out of adjustment, and this affects picture geometry. The red gun, for instance, might be a little crooked, and this causes its picture to be out of alignment with the other two guns. This is called being mis-converged. So, you have to periodically adjust CRT sets (some of them have automatic convergence, but I think they mostly end up having to be manually fiddled with from time to time). The beam also has to be properly focused onto the phosphor face to produce a sharp picture.


Also, because you're having to put a lot of power into the CRT to get a bright image, there's a danger of "burn-in". The phosphors on the CRTs actually wear over time, and if you use one area of the screen more than others, you can end up with a ghost image permanently visible on the screen. On 16:9 wide-screen sets, this is particularly dangerous when displaying normal TV broadcasts centered on the screen. You can end up wearing the middle of the screen faster than the edges. Most widescreen RPTVs display gray bars to the sides of a centered TV image to even out the wear, but I've seen burn-in even on such sets.


SO, what does all this have to do with DLP?? Well, DLP addresses many of the shortcomings of CRTs. A DLP is basically a large microchip (around 1.2 inches on the long side) which has a grid of millions (literally) of tiny hinged mirrors mounted on it. The mirrors can be tilted so that they reflect incoming white light to the screen, or they can be tilted so that the light is deflected away from the screen, producing black. These mirrors can be repositioned very quickly, so to get shades of gray, the controlling electronics "buzz" them at different frequencies to reflect more or less light over a period of time. So, by driving the mirrors with electronics, a single DLP chip produces a grayscale image.


There are two ways to get color rendition out of a DLP system. One way is to use three chips. This is similar to a CRT system, but with some advantages. White light from the light source (a big bulb) comes through a fancy prism that splits it out to red green and blue. The colored light bounces off the three DLPs and is recombined to make a color picture. Because the structure of the DLP is fixed (the mirrors are permanently fixed in a grid), you never develop convergence problems. If the set is properly converged to begin with, it stays that way. This is the solution often used in large projectors, and it tends to produce very bright images with vivid color.


The other way is to use a single DLP and a spinning "color wheel". The color wheel has red, green and blue filters in it, so that as it spins the red, green or blue light is sequentially presented to the DLP. As the colors change, the DLP is switched to display the red, green or blue component of the image. If you do this fast enough, our eyes do the work of re-combining the three colors to a full color image. Slow-turning color wheels may have a problem called "rainbow", where if you move your eyes rapidly the red, green and blue parts of the image won't hit the same part of your retina. In essence, the convergence error happens in your eye. Recent DLP engines use a 4x or 5x color wheel (it spins faster), which by and large gets rid of this problem.


Okay, so what are teh advantages and disadvantages of DLP. First, the reason DLP is called "Digital Light Processing" is because the process of creating a picture is entirely digital. With a digital input source, there's nothing analog about the process until the light leaves the mirrors. Theoretically, this should be able to produce incredibly sharp, noise-free picture. Because the mirror grid is fixed, it never needs to be converged. If it's properly set up to begin with, it should never need adjustment. The mirrors do have a lifespan, but according to TI it's a very long life span, and the picture should stay nice and bright throughout that span. DLP systems have NO potential for burn-in. Because it's just light bouncing off a mirror, it doesn't really matter whether you use the whole surface of the chip, or leave the same image on screen for a long time. As long as the system is properly designed to provide cooling to the chip, you can use a bright light source and produce a VERY bright picture.


Disadvantages. Cost is one. Part of that is "what the market will bear", and part of it is that the DLP chip itself is a new technology and still a little expensive to manufacture (a chip with a stuck mirror is no good for home theater, so they have to be perfect). Some DLP systems don't produce as much contrast as a good CRT, because a little of the incoming light gets reflected even when the mirror is out of position. Also, because the mirror grid is fixed, any image that does not exactly match the grid array needs to be "scaled" to fit (some CRT projectors can actually vary the rate at which they scan the beam across the face of the tubes, so they can adapt to match the signal). Scaling can introduce "artifacts" if done poorly, so the quality of the scaler in the set is important.


Finally, let me mention a competing technology. There's another reflective technology called D-ILA. In this technology, rather than putting a zillion mirrors on a chip, a thin layer of liquid crystal is deposited on the surface of a chip. The chip is able to control the polarization of the liquid crystal to make a picture. There are three-chip D-ILA systems for front-projection, and JVC has just introduced a single-chip "D'Ahlia" system that uses a chip with three times the number of pixels on one chip (one each for RGB) and a fancy holographic film that splits the light into RGB components for each of those pixels. It looks darned good, and has the substantial advantage of having absolutely no moving parts (excepting the fan to cool the bulb).


I hope this provides some useful information to you in making your decision.


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,314 Posts
Mike, thank you so much for the excellent post. I have read lately that some DLP front projectors are becoming very popular, they also appear very affordable. Will this lead to the rapid cost decline on the DLP RPTV segment? I ask this since cost seems the only prohibiting factor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
I certainly hope so. Also, the recent announcement of the Sharp front projector using a new version of the 720p DLP element with 1100:1 contrast (!!) is intriguing. If that kind of contrast ratio makes it to the RPTV as well, it would address one of the complaints against the DLP units.


The only problem, of course is that as DLP becomes more popular, they may actually become *less* available if TI can't keep up with demand. That would have the wrong effect on pricing.


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Before anything, want to thank you for an awesome response-post. Not only did you give me a ton of info to consider, but ya didnt mind helping the ignorant fill up their empty heads hehe. Now i hope im not pressin my luck to much, but here goes.


First thing im curious about Mike is, you mentioned there will be 2 ways of doing DLP, One with 3 chips, and the other with 1 chip. Definately sounded like you endorsed the former over the latter. Question is, i often find i have neough trouble getting simple info out of companies about their product ( try getting info from ProScan sometime, the Crusades seemed easier) So any hint as to the best way ill be able to tell or find out who uses what..?


Secondly you mentioned DLPs inability to deal with some reflected light, which causes contrast problems. This would be of vital importance to me only because i tend to have my sets with a fairly high amount of contrast (guess thats jut the way i like it...my brights bright and my darks black) If you think this is really a significant problem, do you think itll be corrected or is it more inherint in the design.


Third, the scaling issue actualyl surprised me more than anything. It would seem logically to me that this would be a software shortfall, seeing as how if each frame is drawn left to right top to bottom entirely based on a digital input, then the software must be lacking in how to deal with it.


The D-ILA technology seems to also be very intriguing. I gather it also is based on completely digital, completely progressive scanned basis. Ill be very interested to see if it manages to prevail in the physical shortfalls you mentioned in the DLP solution.


Also correct me if im wrong, but what i dont get is how non-DLP or D-ILA HDTVs seem to be able, or promote themselves as being able to handle data from a computer and reproducing it using methods like line doubling and such. I mean wouldnt this be a near requirement for anyone who plans to use theyre HDTV with theyre HTPC for mroe than just an MP3jukebox..? I cant see how you could do, say, PC gaming on an HDTV without this, if i undestand it correctly. Seems to me that DLP and D-ILA are the sorts of requirements of HDTV i think ive been waiting for (and i been waitin a LONG time hehe..ive been telling people about the marriage between puters and TV for near 20 years now)


PS: havent really had a big chance to checkout alot of the forward projectors, but seems to me that theyre overall clarity will always be second to single units (of course, i used to say the same thing about direct view VS projection...well...back then they were inferior in clarity~! hehe)


------------------

Rama

"He who (BLEEPS) nuns, will later join the church "c> - Joe Strummer, The Clash
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
384 Posts
Great posts. I have a simple question. Is D-ILA technology the same thing as LCOS which I believe stands for Liquid Crystal on Silicon?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
In short, I believe the answer is yes. D-ILA is JVC's implementation of the technology, so it may differ some from other manufacturers (like the upcoming RCA). D'Ahlia is a combination of D-ILA with the fancy hologram filter for single-chip full color without a color wheel.


Now, let me take a stab at some of Rama's follow-up questions.


First, many folks consider 3-chip DLP to be superior in color quality. The problem there is that they're much more expensive, and as far as I know only available in a front-projection system. (As an interesting aside, there's an RCA set coming soon that will be a 3-chip liquid-crystal-on-silicon set (like D-ILA)).


Contrast. I looked at the Panasonic set recently, and found the contrast to be unacceptable. There's no telling whether that was just how it was adjusted, though. The best idea here is to look for yourself to see whether the image is acceptable to you. If the 1100:1 element that Sharp is using in their front projector makes it to rear projection with similar contrast, that would also be very promising.


Scaling. Yup, it's mostly software -- although these days the software may reside on a third-party chip that the manufacturer buys and uses. What's important is to get a set where they've spent the time and money on good software (and perhaps more expensive hardware to be able to do a fancier scaling operation).


Lastly, display of computer data. Your computer monitor isn't digital (unless it's very, very new), and it can display computer data. A VGA connector for a monitor is an analog connector, believe it or not. There's a newer computer connector called DVI (and a couple of similar ones), which sends digital data to the display for display. The JVC D'Ahlia actually has a DVI input, although it's not clear to me how compatible it is with a computer's DVI output, and I can't get an answer out of JVC...


Personally, I'm presently shopping for an HD RPTV. My strong leaning is towards the JVC D'Ahlia, because it has no moving parts and no potential for burn-in. I would consider the Mitsubishi DLP, except that it has the moving part of the color wheel (and the mirrors, if you count those), and it's too expensive.


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
716 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by JustMike:
Contrast. I looked at the Panasonic set recently, and found the contrast to be unacceptable. There's no telling whether that was just how it was adjusted, though.
My local GoodGuys had the $14k Mitsubishi DLP setup in their store and I took a gander at it at the weekend. I thought the image on a Toy story DVD was absolutely stunning (a built-in 1080i scaler?) and the contrast wasn't at all bad. I did see square pixels.



------------------

"You can't argue with a confident man"

- Napoleon Wilson, Assault on Precinct 13
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
I'd like to take a moment to thank Mike for the information provided his posts. Mike, big thanks . Fletch "Fletch


[This message has been edited by Dfletch (edited 08-13-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
My pleasure!


FYI, when I saw the Panasonic, what caught my attention were the closing credits of the DVD they were using as a demo. They were white text on a black background, and the black was rendered as a very visible medium gray. When I noticed that, I searched back a few chapters on the DVD, and it was pretty easy to notice the lack of deep blacks. Ick. Again, though, this set may have been improperly adjusted.


I've only seen the Mitsubishi at CES at the TI booth, where unfortunately they kept insisting on demonstrating some Windows software using the display as a computer monitor (which looked great, by the way). I never got a chance to see it showing video content for more than a minute or two. I'm astonished that the Good Guys had the set in stock. I'll have to check my local store.


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)


[This message has been edited by JustMike (edited 08-13-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20,517 Posts
Quote:
Originally posted by JustMike:
I hope this provides some useful information to you in making your decision.
Beauty of a post Mike. But you left out one big advantages of the new digital reflective projection technologies (DLP, D-ILA--Direct Drive Image Light Amplifier--and now LCOS--Liquid Crystol on Silicon, used in RCA's new Scenium RPTVs). Reduced cabinet sized. We're not talking plasma thinnest by a long shot--and not nearly as expensive as plasma at the same resolution--but they're a third less deep than a CRT-based RPTV, making them fit much more nicely in say, an apartment living room. For instance RCA's 50" L50000 LCOS set and Panasonic's 52" PT-52DL10 (very cool styling--I've salivated over it in shops) are both 18" deep, while Mitsubishi's 55"er is 28" deep, typical of CRT RPTVs of its size--the 46" Mitsubishi is 47.125". I just moved into a fairly spacious townhouse, but in my last apartment, 9"-10" in front of the couch was a lot of valuable real-estate.


Well, I just checked that and at 24" deep, the 61" D'Ahlia is not appreciably thinner than most 60+" RPTVs--only about 4" less than the typical 65"er. I wonder why? Oh well. It does hold true for DLP and LCOS, though.


-- Mike Scott



[This message has been edited by michaeltscott (edited 08-13-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Mike, thanks again for another great post. Since you nearly seemed to ask a question, and i have a partial answr, couldnt resist~!


I have found at least 2 DLP rear projection sets (the links will take you to the manufacturers page about the set)


Mitsubishi WD65000: http://www.mitsubishi-tv.com/dlp2.htm


Panasonic PT-52DL10: http://www.prodcat.panasonic.com/sho...=True&active=1


Im pretty sure ive seen more around, including the Hitachi 55DMX01W, but either i cant remember which model, or like the Hitachi, they dont have a webpage about it yet, just a PDF manual. The Hitachi site didnt seem to list any info about theyre 2001 models on theyre pages, you have to get the PDF brochure. Take a gander and let me know whatcha think.



------------------

Rama

"He who (BLEEPS) nuns, will later join the church "c> - Joe Strummer, The Clash
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Mike, you're right! These do have the potential to be both thinner and lighter. I don't know why the D'Ahlia isn't thinner (or lighter, for that matter), but maybe there were other factors at work. I gather it has one heck of a big sound system in it, so that may have some factor. I dunno.


One thing that's nice about the D'Ahlia, though, is that you should still be able to put a center speaker on it, which you can't on the RCA LCOS because it's too thin. Not sure about the Panasonic. (BTW, I think D-ILA and LCOS are basically different names for the same thing, unless I've missed something).


Rama, you're welcome!


Thanks for posting those links! I'm familiar with both of those sets (those are the ones I was referring to in my previous two postings), and I *think* I saw the Hitachi at CES as well. The Panasonic and Mitsubishi (and I believe the Hitachi) use the TI 720p-native (720x1280) DLP element. They're all single-chip systems with a color wheel.


The Sharp front-projector I mentioned uses a newer version of that element "optimized for front projectors" according to Sharp -- that's the one that delivers 1100:1 contrast ratio. It also uses a single chip and a color wheel. If they could deliver that newer element with that contrast ratio to RPTV, it would really be something. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/smile.gif


Here's a link to the D'Ahlia page at JVC: http://www.jvc.com/product.jsp?productId=PRD4209300

------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)


[This message has been edited by JustMike (edited 08-14-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
60 Posts
The Good Guys store near Washington Square in Portland, OR has the Mits DLP set on display, showing satellite HDTV in a darkened living room setting. It looked gorgeous to me, but the price didn't.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,594 Posts
One thing I would caution all of you folks considering these DLPs, is to view them under a VARIETY of programming. When I first saw the Panasonic DLP playing a loop of a HD baseball game, I was very impressed. However, on a later visit to the same store, the Panasonic was showing The Perfect Storm. A number of low contrast scenes in the movie looked downright bad, displaying an almost "solarized" look. I also went into the video menu and saw the "picture" level was peaked at 100%. I tried different settings to no avail. I don't know what this is due to or whether it's just a limitation of the technology in this stage of its development. I have also seen the Mitsubishi and thought that it's contrast was somewhat limited, and not quite as great as the Panny playing the same HD baseball loop. I wasn't able to see the Mits playing low contrast HD.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
I've had the same experience. The Panasonic didn't look solarized, but the contrast was very poor.


On the other hand, on another occasion I saw it set up at a store where supposedly it had been carefully calibrated, and it looked good on the material presented.


When I go to check out the D'Ahlia, I'll be taking a stack of DVDs with me. http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/wink.gif


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)


[This message has been edited by JustMike (edited 08-14-2001).]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33,594 Posts
Mike,

If possible, make sure to catch some low contrast HD scenes. I would imagine it's possible that HD & DVD could be handled somewhat differently in terms of contrast and dynamic range.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Mike:


Looks like you've done some extensive research and homework on the D'Ahlia. Thanks for informative advice. If I may inconvienence you once more I have a few questions you'll likely be able to answer.


1) Many mentions of a 'stuck mirror' are made on the DLP's, rendering them useless, but since a D-ILA has no moving mirrors, this impossible, correct?


2) The MITS WD-65000 enables 1080i AND 720p. Since the D'Ahlia would be perfect for HTPC uses (ie: HDTV tuner card for ABC in 720p, and HD-DVD in 720p) you'd think JVC would keep up with the competition. (You would have to convert the VGA output of your PC to component signals using the audio-authority converter, Model 9A60, however.) Would you anticipate this addition? You hate to have to UPconvert progessive signals to 1080i and risk artifact introduction. Also would you anticipate firewire and or USB compatibilty as the new Sony's have, so that a converter is not needed?


3) Did you see the model in Sacramento? How did it look? What were they asking?


4) Focus Enhancements makes a scaler to max out at 1280 X 1028, especially designed for the D-ILA chip. I am assuming this was designed for the JVC FRONT projector, but I wonder if it can be used for the D-Ahlia.


I have been following the AV-61S901 since its first press release in Dec '99, with an MSRP of $6500. I was insulted and pissed, just as everyone else in this forum, to learn that JVC jacked the price to over $12000 AND encrypted the 'new' unit (AV-61S902) with DFAST. This may make it impossible to download HD programming onto your hard drive, via the PCI HDTV card, for time shifting....just as you would do for standard definition TV on TiVo.


As a result of this, I called a friend of mine in japan and made plans to buy the model that was released in 1998, the HV-D50LA1. It is only 50" instead of 61" but uses the same hologram technology. It would require conversion to 110 volts and using an external tuner (such as a VCR). The only minor difference is that it uses a different comb filter, not a hard problem to overcome, however. The downside is that the warranty would be invalid and it's not UL listed. These small inconvienences may be worth the risk depending on what JVC has on the horizon.


Thanks again for your insight.

Sawyer
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
40 Posts
Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Ill try to keep the easy ones quick and painless, cause one of these is gonna be a PITA.


--> Rex, just how much were they chargin for the mits WD6500 you saw..?


---> im surprised about the opinions about these having contrast issues. You would think that with digital signal, contrast would be stark and easily managable. I would have thought there would be more concern or complaitns about iamges looking washed out, or pixalated (ive seen this effect enough with noise reduction and digital processing of videos, digital can be great, but can often lose those little details...same way many of us felt switching from phono to primarily CD. Possibly what Ken Ross referred to as "solarized" (wasnt sure if he meant same thing as me or not) When i see these problems, reminds me of when i use Photoshop and use a filter called Gradient Blocks. You can make the block sizes real small, but often you get that pixelated washed out, no detail, jagged in a sense. I usualyl dont ee these issues in high contrast areas of a picutre, but in low contrast, in particular black to grey areas...


--> sawyer, you mentioned " This may make it impossible to download HD programming onto your hard drive, via the PCI HDTV card, for time shifting "

This is something im trying to learn all about,so anyone whoi wants to , please chime in~! Id like to switchover alot of the tapes i have and archive them in a better format, like CD/DVD. Of course id also like to be able to get some of the new movies/shows i want to save put direct onto CD/DVD thru the HTPC im planning right now.

I have a very good understanding of puters, but im playin catchup ball her on the whole video side of it. I know there is a whole thing about TIVO, and after posting a bit in the forum there, and getting some links, i have a fair idea of how to go about things that way. Of course even as i learned alot of the taboo things there, i also learned that you cant just rip the files direct off of the HD, as there is some question about the partitions causing problems. The other problem is, i really seemed to prefer Dishnetwork over DirecTV. But either way, even if i went with regular Cable, i had thought that even if i didnt use any hack or anything into hard drive based video recorder, i had thought that i could treat my HTPC as either a pass thru for signal (where it also captured) or split off from a pass thru to capture.

SHouldnt i be able to get the signal from the incoming HD source before it hits the TV and capture it on my HTPC in some way (which im learning about) an then have it seperatly go to the set..? Or where you referring to if the tuner/HDTV proc was in the TV unit itself. OR option 3, i guess would be having a seperate HDTV tuner card in the HTPC itself, as opposed to a video capture card capable of capturing HD signal (i dont know if they exist, or if i ve got it ass backwards still a bit)

Yes i know i could post this in other forums, but you all been so great, decided to roll the dice on mo` time. Besides, ive asked similar in HTPC forum and have gotten bupkus so far (could be im bein too long winded or not asking right, or askin in a way that sounds too much like hacking)


Thanks again~!


------------------

Rama

"He who (BLEEPS) nuns, will later join the church "c> - Joe Strummer, The Clash
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,289 Posts
Hi Sawyer!

Quote:
1) Many mentions of a 'stuck mirror' are made on the DLP's, rendering them useless, but since a D-ILA has no moving mirrors, this impossible, correct?
I believe that's correct, although in truth I don't know how common a stuck pixel is on a DLP. I suppose it's possible that we'll find out about some issue with D-ILA technology down the road, but for my money no moving parts is a Good Thing (tm). And don' t forget the color wheel that the single-chip DLP units have, and that the D'Ahlia doesn't.

Quote:
2) The MITS WD-65000 enables 1080i AND 720p. Since the D'Ahlia would be perfect for HTPC uses (ie: HDTV tuner card for ABC in 720p, and HD-DVD in 720p) you'd think JVC would keep up with the competition.
Well, okay, hang on a sec. Both of these technologies have a native resolution, so some scaling will be happening with both. The 65000 only supports 1080i input, even though its element is 720p native. So, a 720p broadcast signal will have to be upconverted to 1080i, then the set re-converts it to 720p. Ick. According to the spec sheet, it also does not support 1280x720 resolution on the PC inputs. I've had a hard time finding specs for the Panasonic, but as far as I can tell, it does support 720p input.


The D'Ahlia's element is 1280x1028, so it's also scaling everything (both 1080i and 720p). I have not been able to get any response from JVC about what resolutions they support on the DVI input, or even if non-HDCP content coming over the DVI will be used.

Quote:
Also would you anticipate firewire and or USB compatibilty as the new Sony's have, so that a converter is not needed?
I'm not sure what you'd use USB for. I don't expect that a FireWire connection will be in the offing on this set (see the thread I reference below).

Quote:
3) Did you see the model in Sacramento? How did it look? What were they asking?
I haven't been to Sacramento yet. I saw the set at CES, but it's hard to evaluate on a show floor. I believe they're asking $9999.


Now, regarding DFAST and the D'Ahlia's incorporation of the DVI/HDCP interface. The simplest thing would be for you to read this posting in another thread:
http://www.avsforum.com/ubb/Forum11/...361-4.html#133


(Be sure that the browser takes you to the #133 tag, which is my posting. If not, you'll need to scroll down quite a bit.)


Rama, a couple of answers for you:


Contrast. Digital or analog aren't the issues with contrast. The physical capability of the display device is. Apparently the current 720x1280 DLP element in RPTVs has relatively low contrast and perhaps some issues with dynamic range or linearity (the latter 2 would cause "solarization"). What I don't know yet is how the D'Ahlia fares in this department. That's why I'm waiting on Gary's review, and looking forward to taking a road trip.


Recording. This is covered in the posting I referenced above.


------------------

Mike Kobb

(Formerly "ReplayMike", but no longer affiliated with the company; these opinions are mine alone.)


[This message has been edited by JustMike (edited 08-15-2001).]
 
1 - 20 of 25 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top