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Hello,


I just had a home theater installed in our first-floor living room using 5 in-ceiling SpeakerCraft AIM's. Everything is working just great, but my wife and I have noticed that the speakers can be heard in the bedrooms on the second, whether it's movies or music, and without a lot of volume.


The SpeakerCraft's are mounted in the ceiling, which is an open truss design. Is there anything we can do to dampen/lessen the level of sound transfer between the first and second floors? Is there any type of insulation that we put behind/around the speakers, considering it would have to be a retrofit and be installed through the speaker rough-in holes?


Any ideas are immensely appreciated. I need something to keep the peace in the house :)


Garry
 

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Hi Garry,


You're in a tough situation, I'm afraid. You can't build up the isolation of your ceiling because you don't have access to it. I can think of two possibilities:


1. Enlarge the rough-in holes so that you can build a sound isolation box around your speakers. This would need to be something like 1/2" MDF, sealed airtight and lined with fiberglass. An additional inner wall to the box would also help. The whole thing would need to be attached to your ceiling with some kind of isolation mount, and this attachment sealed airtight as well.


2. Build a sound isolation layer on the floor of the rooms above. There are different ways to do this, none of them cheap or easy.


2 1/2. You could blow in some cellulose insulation. This is the easiest thing to do, but would help at mid to high frequencies, with negligible effect at low frequencies. Actually, this in combination with solution 1 would be ideal, in my opinion.


Regards,

Terry
 

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I think Terry is right. What you could try is stuff a batt of fiberglass through the hole and let it set on top of the speaker. That should kill some high frequency. To do much more you will need a box around the speaker.
 
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