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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,

In a living room that was completed before I was brought in and asked for my advice, there are 16/2 speaker wires run to the ceiling speaker locations, currently capped with blank wall plates.

I alerted the home owners to the fact that the bedroom directly above the living room will suffer from loud noise as result of the in-ceiling speakers vibrating the floor.


This problem came up in a previous installation I did and could only be resolved by replacing the in-ceiling speakers with in wall speakers.


In the current installation that is not an option since the customer does not want to open walls under any circumstance so I must use in-ceiling speakers.


I came up with the following solutions and explained to the customer that though they may reduce the sound levels it will not eliminate the nuisance altogether:

1 Use enclosed speakers as used in commercial applications

2 Use a back box

3 Insert acoustic insulation in the void between the joists which will hold the speakers

4 wrap acoustic insulation around the back part of the speaker

5 lay a heavy rug on the 2nd story bedroom floor



and now, if I may ask you all for your ideas, suggestions, and opinions on how to tackle this
 

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You might also try raising the subwoofer/speaker crossover to it's highest setting in the receiver (maybe 250Hz) to keep as much bass as possible out of the ceiling speakers and in the subwoofer. Also, I think Crutchfield carries a dense sound deadener (dynamat I think) which is like what they use in car floors to deaden noise. That might be worth a try (I haven't used it though).
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by krnsus /forum/post/15597204


just what the doctor ordered! thanks!

Please let us know how they work out for you. Another data point is always helpful.


Craig
 

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Depending on the scope of your project, is it possible to replace the sub-floor on the second story? If so I have had success using a product called quiet wood- obviously the more sub-floor you can replace the better- make sure you seal the seems- and adding deadening materials in the cavity will help as well-


Here is the link for the quiet wood-

http://www.quietsolution.com/index.html


For me I was able to purchase just what I needed and picked it up directly- I also have used the quiet coat material and the results are more specific to the substrate it is applied to- much more success on thin sheet metal and plastic enclosures which simply benefit from the added mass.


Good luck-
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Kevin, thanks for that but I highly doubt the customer will be willing to go that far since they just finished renovations and don't want any more "dirty work" in the hose, nor do they have the budget. They were surprised when I even brought the problem to their attention since the guy that ran the wires never mentioned it.

So many of my customers call me saying "we just finished renovating and painting our room, we are ready for you to come install our system..."
 

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Here's the easy way out...


There are a few speaker companies, not just Triad, that manufacture fully engineered, damped, enclosed inceiling speakers that transfer almost no sound into the adjacent floor. Why spend thousands more to add a layer of soundproofing between the floors so the cheap, plastic, open-back inceiling speakers are isolated?? Why not just use real speakers? They'll sound better and have far better isolation. I don't care if you use James, Triad, Snell, or any of the REAL ceiling speakers, but please consider enclosed speakers. NOT a backbox, by the way.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/15603845


Here's the easy way out...


There are a few speaker companies, not just Triad, that manufacture fully engineered, damped, enclosed inceiling speakers that transfer almost no sound into the adjacent floor. Why spend thousands more to add a layer of soundproofing between the floors so the cheap, plastic, open-back inceiling speakers are isolated?? Why not just use real speakers? They'll sound better and have far better isolation. I don't care if you use James, Triad, Snell, or any of the REAL ceiling speakers, but please consider enclosed speakers. NOT a backbox, by the way.

I completely agree with Paul. A "designed-from-the-outset" enclosed speaker will have inherent advantages over just a backbox like I linked to. The backbox will help with sound isolation. A well designed enclosure will help with sound quality... isolation is just a happy by-product.


Craig
 
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