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Hi All


I'm completely remodelling our entire first floor (back to studs) and want to try and incorporate some acoustic treatments in the structure if possible, I have a living/HT room on one side of a stud wall and large kitchen on the other side. I pretty much know where the sub will be in living room and will use in-wall sub (with in-ceiling speakers) in the kitchen (21 x 12). Is there anything I can put inside the drywall that will act as a bass trap?


Also any advice for audio in the kitchen: a lot of hard surfaces (little absorption; although, quite a bit of diffusion)


Regards


Mark
 

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If you want to take the opportunity to isolate your media room, bass traps in the walls (or subs, for that matter) will counter that. Personally, speaking off the cuff, I am not sure trying to put a bass trap behind drywall is a great idea. Whilst most walls etc. are pretty transparent to bass frequencies, conduction through the drywall and studs, as well as vibration in the drywall itself, will likely negate the impact of bass traps inside the walls. Extra insulation, perhaps mineral wool, inside the walls can help isolation somewhat.


As for the kitchen, diffusion, or reflection? Maybe lots of both... Anyway, some decorative absorption panels on the walls where you can fit them (may be no place good) and used as ceiling panels can help. Thick throw rugs can also help a bit with HF noise. Numerous places carry acoustic absorption panels you can use as ceiling tiles, though of course they have to be light and thin so do little for bass. probably not an issue in the kitchen where you just want to kill some of the high-frequency edge from blasting radios, breaking glasses, etc.



HTH - Don
 

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bass traps/pourous absorption works best at 1/4 wavelength distances spaced from walls - where particle velocity is highest


they should be spaced with a good sized air gap from the walls, or straddling the corners with an air gap - via basic guidelines.


you'll really need to take measurements once you get everything in so you know what and how you need to treat to tame peaks/nulls/decay times/etc.


there are general guidelines you can follow, but after that the fine tuning will be based on measurements of your room
 
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