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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Quick question for everyone...


I am planning on installing in-wall L, R and C speakers from monoprice.com in my basement theater setup... of course I noticed last night that I have a stud running directly down the center of the TV.


Is it possible to still install the center speaker horizontally and centered under the TV (would require cutting the stud)? I would rather not mount the center vertically and off center of the TV for aesthetic purposes.


How important is the center speaker to a 5.1 surround setup?


My other option is to get a free standing center speaker and set it on the media cabinet... but I was hoping to have a complete in-wall speaker setup.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAF_TRobertson /forum/post/16975056


Quick question for everyone...


I am planning on installing in-wall L, R and C speakers from monoprice.com in my basement theater setup... of course I noticed last night that I have a stud running directly down the center of the TV.


Is it possible to still install the center speaker horizontally and centered under the TV (would require cutting the stud)? I would rather not mount the center vertically and off center of the TV for aesthetic purposes.


How important is the center speaker to a 5.1 surround setup?


My other option is to get a free standing center speaker and set it on the media cabinet... but I was hoping to have a complete in-wall speaker setup.

First off, It is a very good thing that a Stud runs along your TV, otherwise the wall mount would not be able to hold the weight.


Second, DO NOT CUT INTO YOUR STUD!!!! This would weaken the stud, which could weaken the hold on your TV and possibly even damage part of the structural integrity of your home. Granted the likely hood that damaging one stud will ruin your homes structural integrity is not very likely but it is never something you want to do without first consulting an professional contractor to analyze how bad it would be.


Third, The center channel pretty much the most important speaker in 5.1 movie audio when watching movies. Most of the sounds and voice comes from the center channel.


Lastly, for aesthetic purposes you could just build out shelving units and get a non-in wall speakers. I am sure you are already aware of this possibility though.
 

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Based on your description it sounds like the stud in question is not a load-bearing wall. Cutting stud & running horizontal brace at top & bottom between adjoining stud walls resulting in boxed-in frame would do the trick (but you need access to those studs for toe-nail attachment to center/side studs).


Bigger question is why do you want in-wall speakers
They will sound boomy/ muffled vs. "on-wall" mounting or even better yet, traditional stand mounted versions.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAF_TRobertson /forum/post/16975056


Quick question for everyone...


I am planning on installing in-wall L, R and C speakers from monoprice.com in my basement theater setup... of course I noticed last night that I have a stud running directly down the center of the TV.


Is it possible to still install the center speaker horizontally and centered under the TV (would require cutting the stud)? I would rather not mount the center vertically and off center of the TV for aesthetic purposes.


How important is the center speaker to a 5.1 surround setup?


My other option is to get a free standing center speaker and set it on the media cabinet... but I was hoping to have a complete in-wall speaker setup.


why do you want in-ceiling LRC
 

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If you are going for a clean elegant install, (unless you have the skillset) I'd recommend you get someone to come in and do the carpentry to remove part of the stud that's in the way and then properly brace it with double headers and vertical braces. Then repair the drywall, paint, etc.


What you're encountering has been brought up before. People want a clean thin screen to hang on the wall, but forget they've got a bunch of speakers, receiver, DVD player, cable boxes, etc. that they can't do much with.


Speaking of which, where's your cable/satellite box and DVD player going to reside?
 

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you could mount the center channel speaker vertically, just to the side of the center stud...if the esthetics of your layout would allow that.


I do agree with a previous poster, if your TV is wall mounted, then you are probably using the stud to help support the weight of the TV, don't cut the stud unless you can open up the wall to reinforce the cut stud (PS: an telling whether a wall is load-bearing or not is not a casual selection).


If none of this works, then either mounting your CC speaker in a shallow frame out in the wall so it misses the stud, or using a stand-alone enclosure speaker are you remaining options.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by raistline /forum/post/16975629


He said in-wall, not in-ceiling.


Oh
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhcorolla /forum/post/16975606


Based on your description it sounds like the stud in question is not a load-bearing wall. Cutting stud & running horizontal brace at top & bottom between adjoining stud walls resulting in boxed-in frame would do the trick (but you need access to those studs for toe-nail attachment to center/side studs).


Bigger question is why do you want in-wall speakers
They will sound boomy/ muffled vs. "on-wall" mounting or even better yet, traditional stand mounted versions.

A properly designed in-wall speaker won't.


There are exactly two reasonable speaker configurations:


1. In-wall. There are no separate reflections coming off the front wall which get integrated into the direct sound with varying effects. There is no diffraction.


2. A healthy distance out, the idea being to get an amplitude + delay combination that causes your brain to ignore the reflection. The greater of 4' and half the distance to the listener is a nice starting point.


where #1 can be superior in all ways (frequency response, distortion, peak output) except sound stage depth.


A speaker not designed for placement near boundaries will get boomy and give your singers chest colds when placed near them. One designed for placement in such situations that's moved away from the walls may get cleaner at higher frequencies but will definitely suffer a low frequency paucity and get thin sounding.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Drew Eckhardt /forum/post/16975773


A properly designed in-wall speaker won't.

Well, the OP did say monoprice.com, & the most expensive in wall speakers I saw on their site was $58 for the pair.



VVV Sorry, I can't buy into your theory in this case.
I'd just rely on the display speakers until I had enough money to buy slightly better speakers. Used speakers off Craigslist, Audiogon, Ebay, AVS, Tweak City, etc. if need be. VVV
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rhcorolla /forum/post/16976100


Well, the OP did say monoprice.com, & the most expensive in wall speakers I saw on their site was $58 for the pair.

You can't judge a speaker without hearing it first. For all we know they could sound better then Sierra Acoustics top of the line models.

Unlikely, but there is the minute possibility nonetheless.
 

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If it were me, and I was using the center stud to carry the weight of the TV, I would remove the drywall from each stud cavity to the right and left of the center stud. I would then double brace both horizontally AND on each end vertically like in my drawing. You will be more than fine with this type of construction remaining solid and carrying/distributing the weight of even the heaviest of TV's.


If you want it even stronger for piece of mind, simply cut 1/2" plywood to match your support studs and glue up support beams consisting of a 2" x 4," 1/2" plywood, 2" x 4" and install the same way. Although, with that arrangement, you could eliminate the second horizontal stud brace.



EDIT: Of course, you would then cover the re-worked space with a new piece of drywall, tape, mud, prime and paint and you'll be good to go. If you're not handy with this stuff, I would hire a pro and you'll never notice a difference and your speakers will be EXACTLY where you want them to be.
 

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Damn, John, you are GOOD! Of course, that's the correct way of doing the job, but probably not practical when we're talking about a pair of speakers that cost under a hundred bucks a pair.


Still, Sir, I defer to your excellent response.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Scarpelli /forum/post/16977101


Damn, John, you are GOOD! Of course, that's the correct way of doing the job, but probably not practical when we're talking about a pair of speakers that cost under a hundred bucks a pair.


Still, Sir, I defer to your excellent response.

Thanks Paul....


The other thing I didn't mention is with the stud cavities open like that, it makes it ubber easy to run all of your speaker, HDMI, RGB, Cable coax or anything else you want to conceal.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by quadriverfalls /forum/post/16977281


Thanks Paul....


The other thing Ididn't mention is with the stud cavities open like that, it makes it ubber easy to run all of your speaker, HDMI, RGB, Cable coax or anything else you want to conceal.

The other thing you didn't mention is that it 100% verifies how I am planning on doing an insert in my wall for my AV cabinet
. Now I will probably triple-up on the sides and use steel beam, but that is just to go way over the top



Nice drawing!
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mhdiab /forum/post/16977383


Nice drawing!

Thanks.... but it's just MS Paint. It's so easy to use, even a Caveman could do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for all the great responses.


The stud is not load bearing - it was installed during the framing of the basement which was done recently. All it does is support the drywall.


I had a home-theater installer come out tonight and give me his quote and ideas about how to do a 5.1 system (and mainly to give me a quote and his opinion on a projector). His suggestion was to either cut the stud where the speaker needs to be installed or to install the center speaker off-center and behind the TV. He said it would be difficult to tell the difference with the center speaker of a 5.1 system behind the TV (thoughts?).


Also - this is my first home theater project and I am installing it all in my recently finished basement (which unfortunately ate up all the money I had saved for this project). I am looking at spending abour $3,000 max for a 50 or 52 inch 1080P plasma TV, receiver, speakers, wires and blue-ray player. The monoprice.com speakers got really great reviews for the cost and since I only plan on staying in this house for a few more years I don't want to install really expensive speakers only to leave them behind when I move. A large reason I finished the basement and am installing an in-wall surround system is to increase the selling point and equity of my current house. I know the monoprice speakers aren't the best but for my needs and situation they are perfect.


What does everyone think about installing the center speaker behind where the TV will be installed?
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAF_TRobertson /forum/post/16977701


What does everyone think about installing the center speaker behind where the TV will be installed?

Like...behind the television? So...the speaker would be firing into the back of the television? The television would be blocking the speaker??


Nuh-uh. Speakers need to be line-of-sight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes that is what the home theater installer recommended to me as an option. His justification was that most plasma/LCD television speakers are located on the back of the TV as well. I know my Samsung 50" plasma fires the sound off the wall the TV is mounted on.
 

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Quote:
Originally Posted by USAF_TRobertson /forum/post/16979994


Yes that is what the home theater installer recommended to me as an option. His justification was that most plasma/LCD television speakers are located on the back of the TV as well. I know my Samsung 50" plasma fires the sound off the wall the TV is mounted on.

Well, there's a reason almost everyone on the planet don't use the internal TV speakers for HT applications. Either the speakers themselves are fairly worthless, or the way they are implemented (like firing backwards against the wall producing muddy reflected sound as opposed to crisp clear dialog) cause them to sound like dog doo.


Mounting the flat screen directly over the CC will sound as bad (if not worse) as using the TV speakers. In which case, I wouldn't even install the center channel. You will get MUCH better sound by just using the R/L mains and running the center channel in phantom mode. Phantom mode is where you select "NO CENTER CHANNEL" on your receiver's speaker set up matrix and the center channel signal is split equally between the R/L main speakers.


It will sound fine and you really won't miss the center if you're sitting right in the sweet spot. The draw back however, will be if anyone is sitting off axis, you will lose some of the center channel presence and it won't be quite as clear.


Really, the work around of cutting out the drywall and stud, then building the support braces and re-drywalling will cost you less than $50 in materials. If you've got a tape measure a couple of saws and a hammer, you could do the project on a Sunday afternoon. It really wouldn't be all that hard at all.
 
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